Rosenberg lab at Stanford University

Undergraduate research

Undergraduates have made substantial contributions to the research of the lab, and several undergraduates have led or contributed to published research. Research opportunities have included assistance on ongoing projects in the lab under the guidance of a graduate student or postdoc, as well as independent projects typically focused around a specific mathematical problem. Undergraduate research experiences have ranged from intense efforts over a single academic term or summer to longer experiences that enable students to participate more substantially in the life of the lab.

Interested students are expected to have experience and interest in one or more areas of quantitative science, such as mathematics, physics, statistics, or computer science, as well as in areas of biology such as evolutionary biology, human biology, biological anthropology, or other related fields. Undergraduates at all levels have been part of the lab.

Publications involving undergraduates

SB Reddy, NA Rosenberg (2012) Refining the relationship between homozygosity and the frequency of the most frequent allele. Journal of Mathematical Biology 64: 87-108. [Abstract] [PDF]

M DeGiorgio*, I Jankovic*, NA Rosenberg (2010) Unbiased estimation of gene diversity in samples containing related individuals: exact variance and arbitrary ploidy. Genetics 186: 1367-1387. [Abstract] [PDF]

I Jankovic, BM vonHoldt, NA Rosenberg (2010) Heterozygosity of the Yellowstone wolves. Molecular Ecology 19: 3246-3249. [PDF]

NA Rosenberg, L Huang*, EM Jewett*, ZA Szpiech*, I Jankovic*, M Boehnke (2010) Genome-wide association studies in diverse populations. Nature Reviews Genetics 11: 356-366. [Abstract] [PDF]

ZA Szpiech, M Jakobsson, NA Rosenberg (2008) ADZE: a rarefaction approach for counting alleles private to combinations of populations. Bioinformatics 24: 2498-2504. [Abstract] [Full text at journal website] [PDF] [Software]

NA Rosenberg, R Tao (2008) Discordance of species trees with their most likely gene trees: the case of five taxa. Systematic Biology 57: 131-140. [Abstract] [Full text at journal website] [PDF] [Supplement]