Robert Siegel
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Darwin Safari 2007 photo page

This page is dedicated to Chuckie D. and to our many extraordinary mentors who made him come alive on this extraordinary "journey of exploration".

It is organized by venue.

Shrewsbury ("ShrOsebury")

Darwin is born!

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The picture is taken at The Mount, home of Darwin's father who coincidently is also named Darwin.
Supposedly Charles was born on the second floor on the left side. I came back later to explore the room.

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Old School Darwin

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Peter Boyd - at the Mount

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The Charles at the Mount

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Darwin and the Bellstone

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The Captain and Charles

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Darwin pixellated

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Mural philosophy

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Shrewsbury stunna

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Barleston - The Wedgwood museum

"Wedged" in

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The venerable bead

wedgewood beads

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Lichfield - home of Erasmus Darwin

Lichfield cathedral

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Erasmus plaque

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The unmitigated excitement of lawn bowling

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What it's like to bee in Lichfield

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Snowdon

Bob on top

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At 1,085 meters (3,560 feet), Snowdon was "the high point" of our trip.

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Darwin gets support from all directions

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Sheep in the city

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Darwin peeps

Sheep love

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Cool hand Sagar

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Kate contemplative on the Severn

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Blist Hill

Josh as group leader

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Porcine breathing apparatus

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Iron bridge

Ironing things out

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The face in the bridge

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Wroxeter

Anne Wrox out

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Edinburgh

Sitting atop Arthur's seat

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Darwinian education

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Darwin's Lothian home

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Darwin's home plaquated

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Darwin lothian around

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Fear and lothian in Edinburgh

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Hume us a tune

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Hello Dolly

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Dolly in the spotlight

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Cloned?

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Castle luminousity

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Works of fire over Edinburgh castle

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Near St John's cathedral

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Oxford

Geoffrey Tyack demystifies Oxford

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Natural History Museum - site of the famous Huxley-Wilberforce debate

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Aye aye skeleon

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Aye aye skeletal hand showing remarkable adaptation of the middle finger

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Tring

Darwin's finches / Gould's revelation

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Aye aye captain

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Zoology of the Beagle

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Kew

A kew-ious sense of elation

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Curly kew

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Pyramid scheme

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Victoria amazonica

Awaiting a giant frog

giant waterlily

Kew Gardens
England
September, 2007

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Infrastructure

giant waterlily

Kew Gardens
England
September, 2007

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Giant lily underside - revealed

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Bar some

goosehead head

Bar-headed goose (Anser indicus)
Kew Gardens
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Nepenthe

nepenthe

Kew Gardens
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Nepenthe

nepenthe

Kew Gardens
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Golden shrimp

goldenshrimp

Kew Gardens
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Roarke juggles three biological concepts

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Cambridge

Keynes and Darwin; Fossils, Finches, and Fuegeans

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Craig and Darwin's octopus

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"I was much interested, on several occasions, by watching the habits of an Octopus, or cuttle-fish. Although common in the pools of water left by the retiring tide, these animals were not easily caught. By means of their long arms and suckers, they could drag their bodies into very narrow crevices; and when thus fixed, it required great force to remove them. At other times they darted tail first, with the rapidity of an arrow, from one side of the pool to the other, at the same instant discolouring the water with a dark chestnut-brown ink. These animals also escape detection by a very extraordinary, chameleon-like power of changing their colour. They appear to vary their tints according to the nature of the ground over which they pass: when in deep water, their general shade was brownish purple, but when placed on the land, or in shallow water, this dark tint changed into one of a yellowish green. The colour, examined more carefully, was a French grey, with numerous minute spots of bright yellow: the former of these varied in intensity; the latter entirely disappeared and appeared again by turns. These changes were effected in such a manner, that clouds, varying in tint between a hyacinth red and a chestnut-brown, [4] were continually passing over the body. Any part, being subjected to a slight shock of galvanism, became almost black: a similar effect, but in a less degree, was produced by scratching the skin with a needle. These clouds, or blushes as they may be called, are said to be produced by the alternate expansion and contraction of minute vesicles containing variously coloured fluids."

Charles Darwin The Voyage of the Beagle

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Cirripedia

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Darwin's finch

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Darwin's last sand?

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Darwin wasafiri at Conduit Head

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Sir Peter Lachmann presents Christ's College, Darwin presides from above

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Barnacles, Darwin, Stott, and Siegel

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London

The great and the great great

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We went to the Jeremy Bentham Pub and stuffed ourselves

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Apparently, Jeremy did as well...

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There is a self-portrait of the photographer on the left-hand side

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Platform Potter

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Upper Gower residence

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Darwin Building Gower Street

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Head lemur, Grant Museum, Gower Street

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St Pancras and the devil's sky

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And who would name their church after an organ, anyway?

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London color

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Natural History Museum, London

Charles x 2

darwin statue and doll

Natural History Museum
London
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Darwin and Huxley

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Natural History Museum
London
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darwin statue and doll

Natural History Museum
London
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Leaf-cutter

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Natural History Museum
London
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Elephant bird egg - Natural History Museum

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This egg is humongous even in comparison with an ostrich egg. The egg is from an extinct species of birds that inhabited Madagascar.

Natural History Museum
London
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Deciphering Bob
self reflection in the Rosetta Stone

rosetta sstone refelction

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Greek to me?
British Museum

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The eye, the eye

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Palatial perambulation

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Downe

Down House

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Studying Darwin's study

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Students mirror Darwin's life at Down

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The sandwalk

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Darwin studies terrestial worming

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Darwin's nepenthe

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Uncoordinated exuberance at Down House

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Following Darwin to the T.

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St. Mary's Church, Downe

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Darwin family tomb

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St. Mary's Church, Downe, England
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Malverne

Malverne is where Darwin took Dr Gully's "water cure". It is also where his eldest daughter Annie died. At this point, Darwin apparent lost his last vestige of belief in a benevolent god.

A dear and good child

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Mourning Annie

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Despite its purity, the Malverne water is associated with plaque

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Font of health

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Laid to rest

darwin's tomb

Westminster Cathedrale
"Under Newton"
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Acknowledgements:

The Darwin Safari was sponsored through the generous and helpful efforts of the Bing Overseas Studies Program at Stanford.

Many people helped to this seminar to evolve. The planning and execution phase included consultations with Bob Stephens, Geoffrey Heller, Bill Durham, Kathleen Rochester, Martin Cheek, Carlos Seligo, Lucy Horton, Heather Narciso, Michelle Silver, and Jenna Coalson. Jenny Gowers and John Chao at BOSP consistently went the extra mile.

I want to acknowledge my real family for putting up with my peregrinations and my home stay family for putting me up.

While on safari, our mission was aided and abetted by an impressive array of Darwinophiles and experts, scientists and naturalists, librarians and archivists, historian and authors, docents and clergy. Among these were Peter Boyd (Shrewsbury), Jon King (Shrewsbury), Randal Keynes (London), Rebecca Stott (Cambridge), Sir Peter and Sylvia Lachmann (Cambridge), Geoffrey Tyack (Oxford), Alan Paton (Kew), Joyce Camber (Downe), Rebecca Stott (Cambridge), Karen Goldie-Morrison (London, Downe), Liz Etheridge (Snowdon), Jack Ashby (London), David Hughson (Edinburgh), Kiri Ross-Jones, Mathew Lowe (Cambridge), Craig Buckley (Cambridge), Steve Laurie (Cambridge), Suzy Antoniw (Cambridge), Richard and Anne Keynes (Cambridge), and many others.

Of course, I am grateful to the actual Darwin wasafiri, who made this an experience of a life-time: Sagar Bapat (often last but never least), Paul Craft, Joy Henry, Lauren Higdon, Roarke Kamber, Julie Kim, Kathryn Ludwig, Chad Sitgraves, Alex Song, Anne Stake, Rebecca Tisdale, Erika Williams, Joshua Wong, Dani Zhao, Becca Sorenson, and, of course, Robbie Torney (who, while not physically with us in Great Britain, was definitely with us in spirit - brassica, solanum, flying spaghetti monster, and all).

Finally, I would like to acknowledge the extraordinary efforts of several people without whom there would be no Darwin Safari. Anja Seitz, Stephanie Williams, and most especially Becca Sorenson (my intrepid TA) were tireless in their efforts to plan, anticipate, and solve every contingency.

Thanks!

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Modified: March 12, 2014 (Happy Anniversary parents!)
Created: September 5, 2007
Contact: siegelr@stanford.edu