Degree Programs - Slavic Languages and Literatures

 

Bachelor of Arts in Slavic Languages and Literatures

The major tracks in Russian Language and Literature and Russian Language, Culture, and History are declared on Axess and appear on the transcript but not on the diploma. The degree option in Russian and Philosophy is not declared on Axess and does not appear on the transcript or the diploma.

Writing in the Major—Undergraduates are required by the University to pass at least one writing-intensive course in their field of concentration in order to graduate. Majors in any Slavic track may satisfy the writing requirement in 2011-12 by passing SLAVGEN 156, Nabokov in the Transnational Context.

RUSSIAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

The Russian Language and Literature field of study is designed for those students who wish to gain command of the Russian language and to study the nation's literary tradition. Emphasis is placed on the linguistic and philological study of literature, as well as the history of Russian literature and related media in the broader context of Russian culture. This major also welcomes students with an interest in Russian and Slavic linguistics.

Majors who concentrate in Russian Language and Literature must earn a grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 (C) or better in order to receive credit toward the major.

Prerequisites—Completion of first year Russian, or the equivalent, as determined by the Language Center placement examination.

Requirements—Candidates for the B.A. degree with a Russian Language and Literature field of study must complete an additional 56 units according to the following distribution:

Russian Language—A minimum of 12 units from:

  • SLAVLANG 111, 112, 113. Third year Russian language
  • SLAVLANG 177, 178, 179. Fourth year Russian language
  • SLAVLANG 181, 182, 183. Fifth year Russian language

Russian Literature—The 20-unit core literature sequence consisting of:

  • SLAVGEN 145. Age of Experiment
  • SLAVGEN 146. The Great Russian Novel
  • Either SLAVGEN 147. The Age of Revolution or SLAVGEN 148. Dissent and Disenchantment
  • SLAVLIT 188. Russian Poetry, or another poetry course offered by the Slavic Department

Electives—Students must take 24 units of electives. These courses are chosen in consultation with the department's chair of undergraduate studies. With department consent, work in related academic fields may be applied toward the degree requirements. Students who have completed IHUM 28A,B, Poetic Justice: Order and Imagination in Russian Culture, with a grade of 'B' or better may count these 10 units towards elective courses required for the major, as may students who have completed the SLE sequence.

Russian courses for 2011-12 include:

  • SLAVLIT 188. Russian Poetry
  • SLAVGEN 156/256. Nabokov in the Transnational Context
  • SLAVGEN 185. Cinemato-graph
  • SLAVGEN 190. Anna Karenina and the Social Thought of Its Time
  • SLAVGEN 196. Prison Literature

Capstone—Students must designate a 200-level course taken in their junior or senior year as a capstone course. Before graduation, skills in writing, textual analysis, and discussion will be evaluated by the Chair of Undergraduate Studies based on work submitted for the capstone course.

RUSSIAN LANGUAGE, CULTURE, AND HISTORY

The Russian Language, Culture, and History field of study is for students who want to obtain command of the Russian language and to pursue a broad, interdisciplinary study of Russian literature and culture in historical context. Emphasis is on the relation of the Russian literary tradition to other arts, including film, as well as the disciplines that have enriched the historical understanding of Russian literature: history, anthropology, art history, political science, and sociology. Majors in the Russian Language, Culture, and History must earn a GPA of 2.0 (C) or better in order to receive credit toward the major.

Prerequisites—Completion of first year Russian, or the equivalent, as determined by the Language Center placement examination.

Requirements—Candidates for the B.A. degree with a Russian Language, Culture, and History field of study must complete an additional 56 units according to the following distribution.

Russian Language—A minimum of 12 units from:

  • SLAVLANG 111, 112, 113. Third year Russian language
  • SLAVLANG 177, 178, 179. Fourth year Russian language
  • SLAVLANG 181, 182, 183. Fifth year Russian language

19th-Century Russian Literature and History—A minimum of 10 units chosen from the following courses or the equivalent; students must choose one course from Slavic and one course from History:

  • Either SLAVGEN 145. Age of Experiment or SLAVGEN 146. The Great Russian Novel
  • A pre-revolutionary Russian history course. 2011-2012 course options are:
  • HISTORY 120B. The Russian Empire
  • HISTORY 221A. Men, Women, and Power in Early Modern Russia

20th-Century Russian Literature and History—A minimum of 10 units chosen from the following or the equivalent; students must choose one course from Slavic and one course from History.

  • Either SLAVGEN 147. The Age of Revolution or SLAVGEN 148. Dissent and Disenchantment
  • A post-revolutionary Russian history course
  • History 22N, 20Q, 120-129, or 220-229 will satisfy the history requirements. Contact the Chair of Undergraduate Studies with questions.

Electives—Students must take 24 additional units of course work in Russian language, literature, history, or other fields, chosen in consultation with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies. Students who have completed IHUM 28A, B, Poetic Justice: Order and Imagination in Russian Culture, with a grade of 'B' or better may count these 10 units towards elective courses required for the major, as may students who have completed the SLE sequence.

Russian courses for 2011-12 include:

  • SLAVLIT 188. Russian Poetry
  • SLAVGEN 156/256. Nabokov in the Transnational Context
  • SLAVGEN 186. Cinemato-graph
  • SLAVGEN 190. Anna Karenina and the Social Thought of Its Time
  • SLAVGEN 196. Prison Literature

Capstone—Students must designate a 200-level course taken in their junior or senior year as a capstone course. Before graduation, skills in writing, textual analysis, and discussion will be evaluated by the CUS based on work submitted for the capstone course.

COGNATE COURSES

Units earned for completion of cognate courses in History, Political Science, Religious Studies, Sociology, Art History, Drama, and REEES may be applied to unit requirements for the departmental major. Consult the Chair of Undergraduate Studies to find out whether a given cognate course is acceptable.

RUSSIAN AND PHILOSOPHY

The Russian and Philosophy option offers students the opportunity to gain a command of the Russian language and literary tradition, while gaining a background in philosophical thought, broadly construed. They take courses alongside students in other departments participating in the program in Philosophical and Literary Thought, administered through the DLCL. This option is not declared on Axess. Majors who concentrate in Russian and Philosophy must earn a grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 (C) or better in order to receive credit toward the major.

Prerequisites—Completion of first year Russian, or the equivalent, as determined by the Language Center placement examination.

Requirements—Candidates for the B.A. degree with a concentration in Russian and Philosophy must complete an additional 67 units according to the following distribution:

Russian Language—A minimum of 12 units from:

  • SLAVLANG 111, 112, 113. Third year Russian language
  • SLAVLANG 177, 178, 179. Fourth year Russian language
  • SLAVLANG 181, 182, 183. Fifth year Russian language

Russian Literature—A minimum of 16 units of Russian literature, including the following:

  • SLAVGEN 145. Age of Experiment
  • SLAVGEN 146. The Great Russian Novel
  • Either SLAVGEN 147. The Age of Revolution or SLAVGEN 148. Dissent and Disenchantment
  • SLAVLIT 188. Russian Poetry, or another poetry course offered by the Slavic Department

Electives—At least 12 units of electives in Russian language and literature, chosen in consultation with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies.

Philosophy and Literature Gateway Course (4 units)—SLAVGEN 181. Philosophy and Literature (same as PHIL 81)

Philosophy Writing in the Major (5 units)—PHIL 80. Mind, Matter, and Meaning (prerequisite: introductory philosophy course)

Philosophy Core—12 units, including the following:

  • Value Theory: one course in the PHIL 170 series
  • Theories of Mind, Language, Action: one course in the PHIL 180 series
  • History of Philosophy: one course from the PHIL 100-139 series

Related Course—An upper-division course of special relevance to philosophy and literature. A list of approved courses is available from the program director.

Capstone Seminar— One capstone seminar must be taken in the student's senior year. This year's capstone seminars are:

  • COMPLIT 226. Narrative and Ethics
  • PHIL 194L. Montaigne

HONORS PROGRAM

Majors in any track or option with a grade point average (GPA) of 3.3 (B+) or better in their major courses are eligible to participate in the department’s honors program. Prospective honors students must choose a senior thesis tutor from among the department's regular faculty in their junior year and may enroll for 2 units of credit in SLAVLIT 189B in Spring Quarter of the junior year to conduct preliminary research and draft an honors proposal under the guidance of their tutor. In addition to the program requirements above, students must also complete the following:

  1. Majors who propose a senior project in literature must take a course in literary or cultural theory, such as SLAVLIT 200 (Proseminar in Literary Theory and Study of Russian Literature), a graduate seminar in the area of their topic, or DLCL 189, a 5 unit seminar that focuses on researching and writing the honors thesis. DLCL 189 is taken in Autumn Quarter of the senior year.
  2. SLAVLIT 189A, taken for 5 units of credit while composing the thesis during Winter Quarter. Students who did not enroll in a 189B course in the junior year may enroll in SLAVLIT 189B in Spring Quarter of the senior year while revising the thesis, if approved by the thesis adviser.
  3. To qualify for honors, the candidate must receive a grade of ‘B’ or better on the thesis or project completed during this period. Up to 12 units may be awarded for completion of honors course work, independent study, and the finished thesis.

 

Minors in Slavic Languages and Literatures

The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures offers three undergraduate minor options.

The minor is designed for students who, while pursuing a major in another program, seek a comprehensive introduction to Russian culture through Russian language courses, a combination of minimal proficiency in Russian and courses in the history of Russian culture, or a multidisciplinary introduction to Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies. Students seeking a Slavic minor are encouraged to take advantage of the Bing Overseas Studies Program in Moscow. Students who have chosen one of the minor programs in Russian may use 5 units of IHUM 28A,B, Poetic Justice: Order and Imagination in Russian Culture, with a grade of 'B' or better towards their electives.

MINOR IN RUSSIAN LANGUAGE

Prerequisites—The minor option in Russian Language requires completion of second year Russian, or the equivalent, as determined by the results of the Language Center placement examination.

Requirements—Candidates for the B.A. degree with a minor option in Russian Language must complete 24 units of Russian language and literature courses according to the following distribution:

12 to 15 units of Russian language:

SLAVLANG 111, 112, 113. Third year Russian Language

SLAVLANG 177, 178, 179. Fourth year Russian language

The remaining 9-12 units should be chosen from SLAVGEN 145, 146, 147, 148; SLAVLIT 187, 188; other courses offered by the department, or, with the approval of the department's Chair of Undergraduate Studies, courses in history, politics, linguistics, or other relevant programs.

MINOR IN RUSSIAN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE, AND CULTURE

Prerequisites—The minor option in Russian Language, Literature, and Culture requires completion of first year Russian, or the equivalent, as determined by the results of the Language Center placement examination.

Requirements—Candidates for the B.A. degree with the minor option in Russian Language, Literature, and Culture must complete 28 units according to the following distribution:

A minimum of 16 units of courses on literature and culture including two from the SLAVGEN 145, 146, 147, 148 sequence (Russian Literature in English Translation), or one from the SLAVGEN 145, 146, 147, 148 sequence and one from the SLAVLIT 187, 188 sequence.

12 units of elective courses either in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures or, with the approval of the Slavic Department's Chair of Undergraduate Studies, in other relevant programs dealing with Russian culture, politics, society, and history.

MINOR IN RUSSIAN, EAST EUROPEAN, AND EURASIAN STUDIES

The minor in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies offers students the opportunity to choose courses offered by the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies (subject code REES) in various departments for their minor.

Requirements—Candidates for the B.A. degree with the minor option in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies must complete 28 units according to the following distribution:

  1. Two core courses: one on Russia and one on Eastern Europe or Eurasia, to be chosen by the student from an annual list of qualifying courses issued by CREEES for their M.A. students.
  2. At least four additional REES courses, totaling at least 20 units.
  3. The student's core and additional courses must include 9 units of course work in the Slavic Department, either literature courses or Russian language in the third year or above. Courses must be distributed among at least three disciplines, such as Slavic, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Art and Art History, Economics, Religious Studies, and Sociology. The Slavic Chair of Undergraduate Studies determines which courses qualify for the minor.
  4. A capstone experience in CREEES, including, but not limited to, one of the following:
  5. a departmental seminar course for advanced undergraduates.
  6. directed reading and research with a Stanford faculty member or a CREEES-approved resident or visiting scholar.
  7. participation in the Stanford Overseas Studies Program in Moscow or Berlin.

Foreign Language—The Slavic/REES minor has no language requirement, but students are strongly encouraged to attain working competence in Russian or another relevant language. Courses at the third-year level or above in Russian or another language of Central Asia, the Caucasus, or Eastern Europe may be counted towards the Slavic/REES minor, up to a maximum of 3 units per academic quarter, 9 units total.

Additional Information—Courses taken at Stanford overseas campuses in Moscow and Berlin may count towards the REES minor, with the approval of the Slavic Chair of Undergraduate Studies; at least three courses for the minor must be taken in residence at Stanford.

Approval of Slavic Chair of Undergraduate Studies—Students interested in pursuing the Slavic/REES minor should consult the Slavic Chair of Undergraduate Studies.

MINOR IN MODERN LANGUAGES

The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages offers a minor in Modern Languages.  This minor draws on literature and language courses offered in this and other literature departments.  See the "Literatures, Cultures, and Languages" section of this bulletin for further details about this minor and its requirements.

 

Coterminal Bachelor's and Master's Program in Slavic Languages and Literatures

University requirements for the coterminal M.A. are described in the "Coterminal Bachelor's and Master's Degrees" section of this bulletin.

The department allows a limited number of undergraduates to work for coterminal B.A. and M.A. degrees in Slavic Languages and Literatures with a concentration in Russian. In addition to University requirements for the B.A. degree, the student must:

  1. Submit an application for admission by January 31 of the senior year. Applicants must meet the same general standards as those seeking admission to the M.A. program. Applicants must submit: an application for admission; a written statement of purpose; a transcript; and three letters of recommendation, at least two of which should be from members of the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures faculty.
  2. Meet all requirements for both the B.A. and M.A. degrees. Applicants must complete 15 full-time quarters (or the equivalent), or three full-time quarters after completing 180 units, for a total of 225 units. During the senior year they may, with the consent of the instructors, register for as many as two graduate courses. In the final year of study, they must complete at least three graduate-level courses.

 

Master of Arts in Slavic Languages and Literatures

University requirements for the M.A. degree are discussed in the “Graduate Degrees” section of this bulletin.

Admission—The requirements for admission to the master’s degree program in Russian are:

  1. A B.A. (or its equivalent) from an accredited college or university.
  2. A command of the Russian language sufficient to permit the student to do satisfactory graduate work.
  3. A familiarity with Russian literature sufficient to permit the student to perform adequately in courses at the graduate level.

The applicant’s previous academic training in Russian language and literature normally serves as an indication of competence. Accordingly, the department does not ordinarily consider applications from students who have not had at least three years of college Russian and some undergraduate training in Russian literature of the 19th and 20th centuries. Before registering for the first quarter’s work in the department, entering graduate students are required to take placement examinations in Russian. Students who fail to perform satisfactorily on such examinations must register for remedial courses in the areas in which they are deficient. Course work in third-year Russian and below carries no credit toward the M.A. degree.

Course Requirements—Candidates for the M.A. should plan course work that ensures adequate preparation for the M.A. final examination at the end of the third quarter of work. Course work should be planned in consultation with the graduate adviser, whose approval of the overall course load is required.

Candidates for the M.A. must complete a program of 45 units, of which 36 units must be selected from courses given by the department.

The M.A. Thesis—The M.A. thesis represents a complete article-length research paper (6,000-9,000 words) that, in both form and substance, qualifies for submission to English-language professional publications in the Slavic field.  The M.A. thesis must be submitted to the thesis adviser no later than the eighth week of your final quarter of registration.

Final Examination—A final examination may substitute for the M.A. thesis requirement.  The final examination requires a student to demonstrate in a written examination

  1. command of the phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicology of contemporary Standard Russian sufficient to teach beginning and intermediate courses at the college level
  2. an ability to read contemporary Standard Russian sufficiently to assist students studying contemporary Russian poetry or literary prose
  3. sufficient familiarity with Russian literature of either the 19th or 20th century to successfully handle survey courses dealing with the chosen period of specialization.

The examination should be taken at the end of the final quarter of required course work.

 

Doctor of Philosophy in Slavic Languages and Literatures

University requirements for the Ph.D. are discussed in the “Graduate Degrees” section of this bulletin.

Students enrolled in the Ph.D. program in Slavic Languages and Literatures are expected to fulfill the following requirements while meeting the program's deadlines in the course of their progress toward the degree:

  1. Course Work, Breadth Requirements, and Overall Scheduling—In consultation with the Chair of Graduate Studies, students are expected to take 18 units of credit each quarter of their first year, 10 units each funded summer, and 10 units each quarter thereafter. They are expected to reach 135 units and attain TGR status in the winter of their fourth year. Entering graduate students must enroll in SLAVLIT 200. For the Ph.D. degree students are free to select course work to suit their individual program of study.  However, candidates must do so in consultation with their adviser (Chair of Graduate Studies or principal dissertation adviser) and are held responsible for all of the areas covered by the general examinations, regardless of whether they have registered for the department's offerings in a given field. For this reason, it is strongly recommended that before taking Ph.D. examinations, students complete seminar-level work directly related to the following broad areas:
  2. Russian Poetry
  3. the Russian novel
  4. 20th-century Russian literature
  5. 19th-century Russian literature (the Age of Pushkin and after)
  6. 18th-century Russian literature (the early 1700's to the Age of Pushkin)
  7. medieval Russian literature
  8. a monograph course on a major Russian author
  9. theory of literature relevant to the major field
  10. Minor or Related Fields—During the course of study, students must develop substantial expertise in a field contiguous to the area of specialization.  A candidate may elect to present a full minor or, in consultation with the graduate adviser, develop a special program in a related field, preferably no later than the second quarter of enrollment.
  11. Related Field—A student is required to complete a sequence of basic courses (12 units) in a chosen discipline outside the department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.  The choice of patterns is one of the following:
  12. a sequence of three courses in one West European literature, selected in consultation with the adviser, or
  13. three basic courses in comparative literature chosen in consultation with the Chair of Graduate Studies (CGS), or
  14. a sequence of three courses in another department selected in consultation with the CGS.
  15. Minor—Students electing a minor should take a minimum of 20 units in graduate-level courses in the minor department or fulfill the Ph.D. minor requirements established by that department. Students considering minors should consult with their adviser, the CGS, the Chair of Slavic Languages and Literatures, and the Chair of the minor department.
  16. Admission to Candidacy—Candidates should read carefully the general regulations governing the degree, as described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.  Department faculty make the decision to advance students to candidacy on the basis of the student's overall progress and promise in the sixth quarter of registration. The candidate by that time must have demonstrated commitment to graduate studies by completing a minimum of 21 content courses (not counting Summer Quarter) with a grade point average (GPA) of 3.3 or better. These must include 14 seminars in the Slavic Department.
  17. M.A. Thesis—The candidate must submit a complete draft of an M.A. thesis approved by the thesis adviser.  The M.A. thesis represents a compete article-length research paper (6,000-9,000 words) that qualifies in both form and substance for submission to an English language professional publication in the Slavic field. The deadline for the M.A. thesis approval is the eighth week of the sixth quarter of registration. Failure to meet these requirements results in termination of enrollment from the Ph.D. program. Following such termination, the student who has fulfilled all of the M.A. requirements may be given the opportunity to take the M.A. written examination in the history of Russian literature. If successful, the student is then awarded the terminal M.A. degree.  In exceptional cases, the written examination requirement may be waived at the discretion of the Chair of Graduate Studies and the Chair of the department.
  18. Proficiency Test—Administered to all entering graduate students, this test determines whether the student's knowledge of Russian language and literature falls below the department's standard (Advanced Low on the OPI test). Students who fail are required to compete appropriate courses in the first year of graduate study. Courses required to meet the language proficiency are not counted towards the Course Work requirement of the Ph.D. degree.
  19. Foreign Languages—A candidate must demonstrate reading knowledge of French or German, plus another language useful for the student's area of concentration, by passing written examinations, or receiving a grade of 'A-' or better in a qualifying class with consent of the CGS. The reading examination in German or French must be passed by the end of the first year of study. The reading examination in the second language of choice must be passed by the end of the second year of study.
  20. Examinations—A candidate must pass the departmental general qualifying examinations, which have written and oral parts. These must be scheduled early in the seventh quarter of enrollment (preferably a day or two before the beginning of academic instruction). The written part covers the history of Russian literature from the medieval period through the twentieth century. The departmental oral qualifying examination follows no later than two weeks after completion of the written exams. The oral examination committee consists of four faculty members and may include one member representing the student's minor or related field; the rest must be drawn from among the Slavic Department faculty. The student makes a 20-minute presentation, following an academic conference format, and based possibly on the student's M.A. thesis. Each examiner questions the student on the presentation and related topics in the history of Russian literature and the minor related field. Following the departmental examinations, a candidate must pass a University Oral examination, consisting of a defense of a doctoral dissertation prospectus and covering content relevant to the area of study, rationale for the proposed investigation, and strategy to be employed in the dissertation research. The prospectus defense is expected to be scheduled at the end of the ninth and. in any case, no later than the beginning of the tenth quarter of registration. Note: Ph.D. examinations are scheduled by the graduate student in consultation with the CGS.
  21. Teaching—Students are required to complete five quarters of teaching within the funding period, including three quarters of first-year Russian and one quarter as a teaching assistant of literature for a faculty member, usually for one of the survey courses in translation: SLAVGEN 145, 146, 147, 148. Students are required to take DLCL 201 in preparation for teaching.
  22. Continuation—Continuation in the Ph.D. program is contingent on fulfilling the following criteria: for first-year students, a high quality of performance in course work (decided by department evaluation); for second-year students, satisfactory academic progress, including an M.A. thesis, which should be completed and approved by the eighth week of the sixth quarter of registration. The principal conditions for continued registration of a graduate student are the timely and satisfactory completion of the university, department, and program requirements for the degree, and fulfillment of minimum progress requirements.  Failure to meet these requirements will result in corrective measures, which may include a written warning, academic probation, and/or release from the program.