German Studies Colloquium

Lecture by Irmela Krüger-Fürhoff: Narrating the Limits of Narration: Alzheimer's Disease in Contemporary Literature

Date: 
Wednesday, 23 October 2013 - 5:15pm - 6:15pm
Location: 
Pigott Hall, Bldg. 260, Room 216
Speaker: 
Irmela Krüger-Fürhoff

Today’s knowledge societies celebrate cognitive performance, autonomy, and the apparently limitless possibilities of medicine.

Lecture by Professor Thomas Levin

Date: 
Thursday, 21 November 2013 - 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Location: 
Pigott Hall, Bldg. 260, Room 252
Speaker: 
Thomas Levin

Presented by the German Studies Lecture Series.

Lecture by Andrew Piper: The Instrumentality of the Book

Date: 
Thursday, 14 November 2013 - 5:15pm - 6:45pm
Location: 
Stanford Humanities Center, Watt Room
Speaker: 
Andrew Piper

The Seminar on Enlightenment and Revolution, 1660–1830, a Stanford Humanities Center Research Workshop in Honor of John Bender and the German Studies Lecture Series present:

Lecture by Sara S. Poor on "Margery Kempe's German Sisters: Anna Eybin and the Late Medieval Devotional Book"

Date: 
Thursday, 18 April 2013 - 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Location: 
Pigott Hall, Bldg. 260, Room 216
Speaker: 
Sara S. Poor

Abstract: As part of a project that explores the roles of literate women in the production and circulation of devotional literature in late medieval Germany, this paper focuses on the book production of one female scribe who, unlike many male and female scribes of her day, signs her name repeatedly in the books she made. Anna Eybin, provost of the Augustinian convent Pillenreuth near Nuremberg from 1461-1476, was according to her sisters the author/producer of "countless" books, though only four of them have survived.

Fantasies of Prevention: Foreknowledge and its Critique in Contemporary German Literature

Date: 
Tuesday, 27 November 2012 - 5:15pm - 6:15pm
Location: 
Building 260 Rm 252
Speaker: 
Stefan Willer

Stefan Willer is Associate Director of the Center for Literary and Cultural Research (ZfL) Berlin and Director of the research project "Prognostik und Literatur" since 2010 and a lecturer at the Institute for Philosophy and the History of Literature, Science, and Technology at the Technical University Berlin since 2010.

A Short Historical Survey of the 800-year European Tradition of "Event Poetry" Called "Sangspruchdichtung and Sirventes"

Date: 
Wednesday, 31 October 2012 - 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Location: 
Pigott Hall, Bldg. 260, Room 252
Speaker: 
Maria Dobozy

Poems and songs survive as texts and sometimes even with musical notation, but we as highly literate readers find it difficult to consider the huge difference between listening and reading, between the reception of melodic song and its text form. Maria Dobozy will present a few examples of texts created for performance.  A great many poet-singers worked outside the love lyric in this genre covering a huge number of topics and themes.

Colloquium by Maria Dobozy: One Battle, Two Perspectives, and Three Cultures in Transylvania, 1551: Unity and Disunity

Date: 
Wednesday, 31 October 2012 - 5:15pm - 6:15pm
Location: 
Pigott Hall, Bldg. 260, Room 252
Speaker: 
Maria Dobozy

This presentation compares two war-related texts, one penned by a German mercenary, Paul Speltacher, and the other by a Hungarian poet, Sebastian Tinodi, who narrate events surrounding the same military battle: the offensive engaged in to capture the town and fortress of Lippa (Lipova, Romania) in Transylvania during November of 1551. The German and the Hungarian eye-witness accounts selectively color and embellish the facts as they see them in order to convey their own evaluation.

Lecture by Michael Brenner: "German-Jewish Responses to the Rise of Hitler"

Date: 
Tuesday, 3 April 2012 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Location: 
Pigott Hall, Bldg. 260, Rm 252
Speaker: 
Michael Brenner

German Jews felt at home in Germany before 1933. When Hitler was appointed chancellor on January 30, 1933, a rapid process of exclusion of the Jews began. Their immediate reactions ranged from attempts at cooperation with the Nazis or resisting them on various levels, while others simply left Germany altogether. This lecture explores the range of German-Jewish responses and attitudes in the immediate aftermath of the Nazi regime.

Confessions of a Bad Humanist: Digital Humanities, N-Grams, and Railways

Date: 
Wednesday, 14 November 2012 - 5:15pm - 6:15pm
Location: 
Pigott Hall (Bldg. 260) Room 252
Speaker: 
Paul Youngman

Paul Youngman is Associate Professor of German at Washington and Lee University and a faculty associate of the Complexity Science Institute at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte. He is the author of several books, including We are the Machine. The Computer, the Internet, and Information in Contemporary German Literature and Black Devil and Iron Angel. The Railway in Nineteenth-Century German Realism.   

Colloquium by Matt Erlin: The Location of Literary History: Topic Modeling, Network Analysis, and the German Novel, 1731-1864

Date: 
Wednesday, 10 October 2012 - 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Location: 
Pigott Hall (Bldg. 260) Room 252
Speaker: 
Matt Erlin
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