German

Paul Nissler

portrait: Justin Calles
Contact: 

Email: pnissler@stanford.edu, Office: 260-250

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Curriculum Vitae: 
Education: 

2006 Ph.D., Penn State University
2000 B.S., UW-Madison

Language(s): 
German

Bill Petig

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Language(s): 
German

Chiann Tsui

portrait: Justin Calles
Contact: 

ctsui@stanford.edu

Chiann Tsui entered the German Studies Department at Stanford University in the 2006-2007 academic year.  She received Bachelor’s of Arts degrees in Germanic Literatures and Languages as well as in Linguistics from the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor.  She also has a Bachelor’s of Music degree in Piano Performance from the University of Michigan School of Music.  Her interests include the dynamics of cultural transference and the relationship between literature and music.  For her thesis, she intends to focus on German-language modernist literature in which China plays a thematic role, and how said literature has been received and adapted in post-Mao China.  In her spare time she might be found doing one of the following: capoeira, aerial fabrics, knitting, sewing, baking, hiking, or sleeping.

Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Chinese

Bronwen Tate

portrait: Bronwen Tate
Contact: 
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

Bronwen Tate is a PhD candidate in Comparative Literature at Stanford University. Her dissertation "Putting it All in, Leaving it All Out: Questions of Scale in Post-1945 American Poetry" uses scale as a lens to reevaluate 20th century poetic theories and practices. At a theoretical level, this project contrasts the opposing compositional impulses and reading experiences of a poetry of essence and a poetry of duration.  Her work brings into dialogue writers as aesthetically divergent as Allen Ginsberg and Lorine Niedecker or Frank Stanford and James Merrill, as well as shedding new light on the feminist book-length poems of Lyn Hejinian and Bernadette Mayer and the gesture of poetic reticence in Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Creeley. Bronwen has taught courses in literature, creative writing, and English composition at Stanford University, Brown University, Borough of Manhattan Community College and other institutions. She is a 2011-2013 DARE (Diversifying Academia, Recruiting Excellence) Fellow. 

Education: 

2013 Ph.D. in Comparative Literature, Stanford University  (Expected) 

2006: M.F.A. in Literary Arts: Poetry, Brown University, Providence, RI

2003: B.A. with Honors in Comparative Literature: Literary Translation, Brown University, Providence, RI, magna cum laude. Senior Honors Thesis: Translation into English of the Italian novel Montedidio with critical introduction.

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Italian

Yevgenya (Jenny) Strakovsky

portrait: Yevgenya (Jenny) Strakovsky
Contact: 

yevgenya@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Friday, 12-2pm
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education

Jenny Strakovsky is a Ph.D. student in German Studies, specializing in the literature, visual culture, music, and philosophy of the long 19th century in Germany. She holds a Bachelor's Degree in German Studies from Dartmouth College and was the 2009-2010 recipient of a Fulbright Research Grant to attend the Humboldt University in Berlin.

While her background spans from the Enlightenment to Cold War literature, her current work explores the rise of individualism in Realism and High Modernism. She is particularly interested in understanding how literature depicts individual autonomy, education, and ethical responsibility through character development and portrayals of moral judgment. 

Her research interests also include: questions of agency, portrayals of artistic genius, legacies of the German Bildungsideal, Jena Romanticism, portrayals of women and gender, ethics and literature, 19th century Visual Culture, Translation studies, Digital Humanities, Humanities Education and Public Policy in post-secondary education. 

 

Upcoming and Recent Presentations

"Revolution as Apocalypse, Poetry as Redemption: Osip Mandelstam’s Cultural Mythology." Modernism, Christianity, and Apocalypse. Conference, Department of Foreign Languages, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. (18-20 July 2012)

"Interpreting Kafka's The Trial through Translation: Experimental Pedagogy." Stanford University, German Studies Forum. March 2012.

"Vocation as a Marker of Moral Agency in 19th Century Modernity." ZfL Sommerakademie, “Erste Kulturwissenschaft und ihre Potential für die Gegenwart”* Zentrum für Literatur- und Kulturforschung, Berlin. July 2011

 

Teaching Experience

At Dartmouth:

Guest Lecturer, "Beyond Good and Evil," Undergraduate Seminar, Dartmouth German Studies Department. Taught By Professor Klaus Mladek. Topic: Christa Wolf's Was Bleibt and Self-censorship in East Germany. Spring 2009

At Stanford:

Instructor/Teaching Assistant. German Language First-Year Sequence* (3 Quarters). Stanford Language Center*
Taught in German. Meets MTWThF. Concentration on Oral Proficiency.
Responsibilities include bringing novice and intermediate speakers to the intermediate-mid level in German; designing pedagogic activities that enable authentic conversational exchange and cultural understanding.

Materials: Textbook Deutsch: Na Klar!, Multimedia (including films, online videos, poetry, journalism, native speaker interviews, web content). 
Assessment: 
computerized oral and written exams. Oral Proficiency Interview (based on National Standards on Foreign Language Learning*).

 

Instructor. Beginner German Conversation. Taught in German. Meets once per week. Responsibilities include designing syllabus based on student interests, facilitating improvement for students of different levels and backgrounds. Haus Mitteleuropa, Stanford University. Spring 2011.

Tutor, Language and Orientation Tutoring Program (LOT)* Individual weekly meetings with international students to improve conversational abilities, writing and presentation skills, and cultural literacy in English. Spring 2011

 

Professional Activities

Co-Founder and Coordinator, DLCL Graduate Working Group on Translation Studies, Stanford University. Spring 2012

Steering Committee, DLCL Graduate Student Conference: Urban Jungles, Stanford University. Spring 2012

Graduate Assistant, Humanities Education Focal Group* Chaired by Russell Berman, Stanford University. 2011-2012.

Editorial Assistant, Professor Adrian Daub, Tristan's Shadow - Sexuality and the Total Work of Art. Fall 2011.

Seminar Assistant, Visiting Assistant Professor Falko Schmieder of the Berlin ZfL. Seminar: "Surviving and the Biopolitics of Bare Life." Spring 2011.

 

* indicates link to source.

Education: 

2009: B.A. in German Studies, Dartmouth College
Honors Thesis: Beyond the Literaturstreit: Understanding East German Literary History in Transition. Advisor: Irene Kacandes

  • This project traced the assimilation of East German artists into a post-Soviet cultural landscape in order to explore the ethical responsibilities of an artist/public figure in totalitarian and free-market societies

2009-2010: Fulbright Research Grant, Humboldt University, Berlin

  • Continuing work on autobiography and self-fashioning, research at the HU explored Goethe's Italienische Reise as a textual medium for performing Morphology.
Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Russian

Lisa Ann Villarreal

portrait: Isaac Bleaman
Curriculum Vitae: 

Lisa Ann Villarreal completed her Ph.D. this Fall in Comparative Literature at Stanford. She received her B.A., magna cum laude, from the Loyola University Chicago Honors College in 2005, with majors in French, English, International Studies, and Philosophy, along with minors in Comparative Literature and Women's Studies.  She has also studied German at the Humboldt Universität zu Berlin in 2006 and attended the School of Criticism and Theory at Cornell University in 2009. Her research focuses on fiction of the francophone, anglophone, and germanophone traditions from the late-nineteenth through the twenty-first centuries, especially Surrealism, minimalism, gothic literature, the fantastic and the uncanny. She is also interested in film and film studies, particularly Weimar and classical Hollywood cinema. Her approach to literary texts is a political aesthetics that draws on phenomenology, Marxism, and post-structuralism.

Dissertation:

The Subject and Matter: The Body and the Space of Narration in Early-Twentieth-Century Literature interrogates the literary work’s capacity to engage the body of the reader, exploring the intersection of narrative representations of the visual and tactile experience of being-in-space and the work’s engagement with its own material dimensions as text, page, and book. Exploring the question of how the material presence of the book inflects the experience of reading, the project examines the use of elements of textual organization such as enjambment, punctuation, paragraph breaks, juxtaposition, and graphic elements in the works of the French Surrealists, Céline, Beckett, and Hemingway.

Committee Members: 

H.U. Gumbrecht (principal advisor), David Palumbo-Liu, Laura Wittman

Publications:

  • "'Là bas où sa race était née': Colonial Anxieties and the Fantasy of the Native Body in Maupassant's Le Horla." [forthcoming in Nineteenth-Century French Studies]

  • “Dead Man Walking: Bram Stoker’s Dracula and the Monstrous Form of Nineteenth-Century Mobility.” [under revision for Victorian Literature and Culture

  • "Hegel as Philosophy of Observation: Reflections on the Discourse of Science and Self-Reflexivity in the Phenomenology of Spirit." [forthcoming in Spanish in La Historia de la Observacion Segundo Grado. Ed. Perla Chinchilla and H.U. Gumbrecht. Mexico City: Universidad Iberoamericana, 2012; forthcoming in German in Beobachtung Zweiter Ordnung — Historisiert. München, Fink Verlag, 2012.]

  • Translation of Geist und Materie--Was ist Leben? Zur Aktualitaet von Erwin Schroedinger, Ed. H.U. Gumbrecht. Stanford UP, 2011.

  • "'A simulation from beginning to end':(Mis)representing Otherness in J.M. Coetzee's Elizabeth Costello" in Declensions of the Self: A Bestiary of Modernity, Ed. Jean-Jacques Defert, Trevor Tchir, and Dan Webb. Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2008.

Conference Presentations:

  • “Telegraphic Style and Post-War Topography: Louis-Ferdinand Céline’s Textual Landscapes.” The Edges of Exposure, Graduate Student Conference, Dept. of French, UC Berkeley. April 27-28, 2012.
  • "Dead Man Walking: Bram Stoker's Dracula and the Monstrous Form of Nineteenth-century Mobility." Travelling Concepts, Metaphors, and Narratives: Literary and Cultural Studies in an Age of Interdisciplinary Research, Hermes Consortium for Literary and Cultural Studies, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen. June 13-19, 2010.
  • "'Ce corps inconnaissable': The Fantasy of the Native Body in Discourses of Degeneration." Fossilization and Evolution, Nineteenth-Century French Studies Colloquium. October 22-24, 2009.
  • "Tracing the Limits of Representation: Freud and Todorov on the Fantasy of Historical Memory."Inside/Outside,Graduate Student Conference, Humanities Center, Johns Hopkins University. April 2-3, 2009.
  • "'Là bas où sa race était née': Reading Race and Repression in Maupassant's Le Horla." Circulation: Networks, Knowledge and the Literary, Eighteenth Annual Conference, French Graduate Student Association, Columbia University. March 6, 2009.
  • “Imagining the Modern: Towards a Critical Historiography (On Eschatological Themes in the Writings of Marx).”Arrivals and Departures, 2008 Annual Meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association. April 24-27, 2008.
  • “Sex, Lies, and the Nation-State: Spies and Sexual Deviants in Proust’s Recherche.” Comparative Literature Colloquium, Stanford University, May 18, 2007.
  • “A Lesson in Narration: Representations of Otherness and the Rational Project in Coetzee’s Elizabeth Costello.”Declensions of the Self: A Bestiary of Modernity, Fifth Graduate Student Conference, Depts. of Modern Languages and Cultural Studies, Comparative Literature, and Political Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton. September 28-29, 2006.
  • “'On est pour son pays comme on est pour soi-même': Proustian Space and the Semiotics of Nationhood.”L’Exception Française: Negotiating Identity in the French National Imaginary, Graduate Student Conference, Dept. of French and Francophone Studies, University of California, Los Angeles. November 2-3, 2006.

 Work in Progress:

  • "Much Ado About Nothing: On Flannery O'Connor 's Engagement with Heidegger" [article]
  • “The Visual Poetics of Minimalism” [article]

Professional Activities:

  • Strategic Communications Internship (researching initiatives to promote the humanities) with the Office of Public Affairs at Stanford University (Summer 2012)

  • Planning Committee, Restructuring Humanities Departments: Language, Literature, Culture, Conference organized by the Research Unit of the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages, Stanford University, May 8-9, 2011.

  • Planning Committee, Avatars: Personae, Heteronyms, Pseudonyms, Third Graduate Student Conference, Dept. of Comparative Literature, Stanford University, April 10-11, 2009.

  • Planning Committee, Corruption in Modern Literature and Theory, Second Graduate Student Conference, Dept. of Comparative Literature, Stanford University. April 4-5, 2008.

  • Co-organizer, Horizons, First Graduate Student Conference, Dept. of Comparative Literature. November 17-18, 2006.

  • Research Assistant to Professor Adrian Daub

  • Aesthetics Project, Research Group of the Philosophy and Literature Initiative, Stanford University. 

  • Philosophical Reading Group, Research Workshop of the Stanford Humanities Center.
  • French Culture Workshop, Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages, Stanford University

  • Working Group on the Novel, Center for the Study of the Novel, Stanford University

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Italian
Language(s): 
Spanish

Erik Youngs

Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Language(s): 
German

Elizabeth R. Romanow

portrait:
Contact: 

romanow@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Performance
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Spanish

Kathryn Hume

portrait: Isaac Bleaman
Contact: 

khume@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Focal Group(s): 
Renaissances
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

I joined Stanford’s Comparative Literature program in 2007, having received my B.A. at the University of Chicago, summa cum laude, with a concentration in Comparative Literature and a minor in Mathematics. My research focuses on the intersection between mathematics, philosophy and literature in 17th and 18th century Europe, primarily in France. Analyzing Descartes’s Géométrie alongside the Aristotelian unities and La Rochefoucauld's Maximes, my dissertation reconsiders the relation between Cartesian rationalism and French neoclassicism. It examines 17th century stylistic tendencies towards generalization, compression, and the generation of complexity out of simple, abstract templates. 

I am also interested in epistemology; the history of evidence and the encyclopedia; modernist and twentieth-century poetics; Italian cinema. I’m a pretty serious violin player and long-distance runner.

PUBLICATIONS

Entries for "Neoclassical Poetics", "Theophrastan Character", Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics, 4th edn. (Princeton University Press, forthcoming, 2012).

Essay submissions in Rédiger un texte académique en français, ed. Sylvie Garnier and Alan D. Savage (Editions Ophrys, 2011)

TEACHING

COMPLIT 156A, "States of Nature in Literature and Philosophy", Autumn, 2011 (Instructor)

Tutor: Intermediate Latin, Beginning Greek, Advanced French, 2010-2011

DLCL 189, "Honors Thesis Writing Workshop", Autumn 2010 (TA)

FRENLANG 2, "First Year French", Spring, 2010 (Instructor)

FRENLANG 1,2,3, "First Year French, Fall, Winter, Spring, 2008-2009 (Instructor)

PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

Assistant to the Director (with Cécile Alduy), Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 2010-2012

Coordinator (with Roland Greene and Nicholas Jenkins), Stanford Workshop in Poetics, 2008-2011

SELECTED CONFERENCE PAPERS

“Speculative Empiricism: The Conceptual Value of Conjecture in Diderot and Rousseau”, SEASECS Annual Conference, Decatur, GA March 1-3, 2012

“Paralepsis, Procedure and Incomplete Reduction in Descartes’s Géométrie”, Inarticulacy: An Interdisciplinary Early Modern Conference, UC Berkeley, November 12-13, 2011

“The Algebra of la Rochefoucauld’s Maximes”, MEMS Workshop, Stanford University, May 19, 2011

“Analogy versus Analysis: Revisiting the D’Alembert/Diderot Debate over Encyclopedic Order”, ACLA, Vancouver, March 31-April 3, 2011

“A Discussion with the Editors” (on the French Encyclopédie), French Culture Workshop, Stanford University, January 31, 2011

“Of Paradise’s Proportions” (on Milton’sParadise Lost), Renaissances Lecture Series, Stanford University, December 3, 2010

“Fiktion als Zugang zur Wirklichkeit. Über den methodologischen Gebrauch der Fiktion im 17. Jahrhundert”, Lecture Series, Simon Dubnow Institute for Jewish History and Culture, Leipzig, November 12, 2009

“Persuasion or Grace? Patterns of Embedded Narrative in Ariosto and Tasso”, Northern California Renaissance Conference, San José State, May 2, 2009

“Descartes’ Relevance to Theories of Fictionality: Time, Identity and Reference in the Discourse and the Meditations”, ACLA, Harvard, March 26-29, 2009 and Interdisciplinary Possible Worlds Conference, Princeton University, March 6-7, 2009

“Descartes’ Fictionality”, Aesthetics Project, Stanford University, October 7, 2008

“Descartes’s LiteraryPhilosophy – Mallarmé’s Philosophical Poesis: Igitur Resurrects theCogito”, The Substance of Thought: Critical and Pre-critical, Cornell University, April 10-12, 2008

AWARDS AND FELLOWSHIPS

Research Fellow, Simon Dubnow Institute for Jewish History, Autumn, 2009

Fellowship to attend the Greek and Latin Institute at CUNY, Summer 2009

Fellowship to attend the School of Criticism and Theory, Cornell, Summer, 2008

Großes Deutsches Sprachdiplom from the Goethe Institute, May, 2007

Phi Beta Kappa, 2005

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Spanish
Language(s): 
Greek

Virginia Ramos

portrait: Virginia Ramos
Contact: 
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

Virginia Ramos is a poet and doctoral student in the Comparative Literature department at Stanford University, California, US. She was born in Madrid, Spain, and currently resides in the United States, where she attended college at San Francisco State University and graduated with a B.A. in French and a M.A. in interdisciplinary Humanities with a focus in World Literature. She is currently working on a dissertation on the relationship between space and narrative in 20th and 21st century with a particular emphasis on modernist and contemporary texts. Her interests center on 20th century poetics, poetry, lyrical novel, and multi-genre texts.She works in Spanish, English, French and German Literatures, primarily. She is interested in poetics of liminality and comparative readings that allow for the 'multiplication' of language, the question of “form as content”, “space as content” and the relationship with historical and societal swifts through the creation of novel narrative and poetry with an attention to physical space, often urban. Her work aims to contrast and theorize current and future trends of transnational thought globally. 

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Italian
Language(s): 
Spanish
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