German

Contemporary Politics in Germany

Subject Code: 
GERMAN
Course Number: 
120Q
Description: 

 

This course provides an opportunity to engage with issues and actors, politicians and parties in contemporary Germany, while building German language abilities. We will work with current events texts, news reports, speeches and websites. Course goals include building analytic and interpretive capacities of political topics in today's Europe, including the European Union, foreign policy, and environmentalism. Differences between US and German political culture are a central topic. At least one year German language study required.
Instructor: 
Russell Berman
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-4
Day/Time: 
MW 8:30 AM - 9:45 AM

Grainne Therese Watson

portrait: Grainne Watson
Office Hours: 
by appointment

 

Gráinne Watson, a native of Northern Ireland, gained her undergraduate and master degrees from the University of St Andrews, Scotland. Her research interests include narratology, identity conceptions and more generally theoretical approaches to medieval German literature. Her dissertation project looks at representations of time in the eleventh and twelfth centuries in the German lands. 

 

Professional Experience:

Graduate Student Coordinator, Theoretical Approaches to the Middle Ages ( Stanford Humanities Center funded Workshop)

2012 Steering Committee, DLCL Graduate Student Conference: Urban/Jungles, Stanford University 

Reader for Hortulus Graduate Journal of Mediaeval Studies (Since September 2009)

 

Invited Talks:

‘Die Darstellung der Zeit im Annolied.’ Medieval Colloquium, University of Tübingen, July 2010.

 

Conference Talks:

"Overcoming Anachronism through Galvanizing Genre: The Case of the German Chronicle."  The Uses and Abuses of Time, UNC Chapel Hill, March 2013

"Modifying the Myth: Temporal Identity Creation in the Alexanderlied."Kalamazoo, May 2012.

"The Corrupt Chronicle:  The Politics of Fictionalizing History in the Kaiserchronik." MLA, Seattle, January 2012.

"Nû ist cît, daz wir dencken, wî wir selve sulin enden- The representation of time in Das Annolied." International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 2010

"The lion, the wild and the women: defining masculinity in Iwein." Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Panel, SAMLA, November 2009

"Fortune favours the male: the gendered role of saelde in Wigalois." Gender and Transgression in the Middle Ages Annual Conference, Saint Andrews Institute for Mediaeval Studies, May 2009.

 

 

Courses Taught and Teaching Experience:

German 3, Stanford University Winter Quarter 2013

German 1 Elementary German, Duke University August 2010- December 2010

German 2 Elementary German, Duke University January 2011-March 2011

German 65 Intermediate German, Duke University May 2011- July 2011

German 65 Intermediate German, Duke University August 2011- Present

GM4089 Germany’s Monsters- a German honours literature module comprised of third and fourth year students, University of St Andrews 2008.

Language(s): 
German

Heinrich von Kleist's Gestures

Date: 
Thursday, 15 March 2012 - 9:00am - Saturday, 17 March 2012 - 6:30pm
Location: 
Stanford Humanities Center
Language: 
German

Conference Program | Directions to Campus Searchable Campus Map

 

Colloquium by Kurt Mueller-Vollmer: German Missionaries, the Indians and the Multicultural Origin of American Linguistics

Date: 
Wednesday, 8 February 2012 - 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Location: 
Pigott Hall, Bldg. 260, Rm 252
Speaker: 
Kurt Mueller-Vollmer
Language: 
German

Colloquium by Peter Burgard: Flemings verdrehte Osculo-Logik und die Ästhetik des Barock

Date: 
Wednesday, 1 February 2012 - 5:15pm - 6:30pm
Location: 
Pigott Hall, Bldg. 260, Rm 252
Speaker: 
Peter Burgard
Language: 
German

Prof. Peter Burgard (Harvard University) will present his lecture in German.

Kristin Boyce

portrait: Kristin Boyce
Contact: 

Sweet Hall 218

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Curriculum Vitae: 

My primary research area is aesthetics. Within aesthetics, the three media I am most concerned to explore are literature, the performing arts (especially dance and theater) and the visual arts (especially film). My research with respect to these three media hangs together in two ways. The first is methodological. I try to show that philosophical questions which arise with respect to them do not admit of general solutions—that finding satisfying solutions depends on taking account of the unique possibilities specific to each of these media, taken individually. Second, many of the topics that most interest me cluster around the following four issues: 1) the relation between form and content, 2) the question of what it means for a representation to be “realistic”; 3) the philosophical problem of modernism, where I take modernism to be the condition an art enters when it enters the condition of philosophy; and 4) questions concerning the limits of representation as they arise within each of these three media. In each instance, my research with respect to these topics specifically within the field of aesthetics proper broadens out to questions which bear on topics in ethics, philosophy of action, and the history of early analytic philosophy. I am currently working on two articles about dance, one article about artistic intention, and one book about philosophy and literature which grows out of my dissertation research, "Why Wander into Fiction? The Role of Reflection Upon Literature within the Analytic Philosophical Tradition."

Education: 

PhD, University of Chicago, Philosophy

MA,  The University of Chicago Divinity School, Religion and Literature

BA, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Mathematics and Religious Studies

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German

Lecture by Matthew Smith: From Gestures to Nerves: Percy Shelley, Georg Büchner, and the Birth of Modern Theatre

Date: 
Tuesday, 6 December 2011 - 4:15pm - 5:30pm
Location: 
Building 260, Room 252
Speaker: 
Matthew Smith
Language: 
German

MATTHEW SMITH is currently an Associate Professor at Cornell University. His published works include The Total Work of Art: From Bayreuth to Cyberspace (New York and London: Routledge, 2007). He is also the editor and co-translator of George Büchner: The Major Works.

The lecture will be presented in English.

Friederike Knüpling

portrait: Friederike Knüpling
Office Hours: 
by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Education: 

M.A. in Modern German Literature, Philosophy, and Political Science at Ludwig-Maximilians Universität München.

Language(s): 
German

Melissa Kagen

portrait: Melissa Kagen
Contact: 

mkagen@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Wednesday and Thursday, 1-2 pm
Education: 

B.A. Brown University (Literary Arts), magna cum laude

M.A. University of Chicago (Humanities)

Language(s): 
German

André Fischer

portrait: André Fischer
Contact: 

fschr@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Education: 

M.A. in German Studies, Comparative Literature and Modern History at Universität Potsdam and TU Berlin

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German
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