German

Opera after Freud

Date: 
Thursday, 2 February 2012 - 1:30pm - Friday, 3 February 2012 - 6:00pm
Location: 
Stanford Humanities Center
Language: 
German

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The conference will take as its point of departure two peculiar facts: that interp

Irmela Marei Krüger-Fürhoff

portrait: Melanie Macdonald
Office Hours: 
by appointment

Dr. Irmela Marei Krüger-Fürhoff is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Center for Literary and Cultural Research (Zentrum für Literatur und Kulturforschung, ZfL) Berlin. She is also a lecturer at Universität Bielefeld. She is interested in 18th-21th century literature and the interrelations between literary and medical knowledge.

 

She has published six books, including her most recent publication in 2012, Verpflanzungsgebiete. Wissenskulturen und Poetik der Transplantation (Munich: Fink) on the history of knowledge and the poetics of transplantation surgery in literature, film, medicine and public discourse. She is also the author of Der versehrte Körper. Revisionen des klassizistischen Schönheitsideals (Göttingen: Wallstein, 2001), a study on medical, aesthetic, and literary approaches to wounded bodies around 1800. She co-edited several books, among them Engineering Life. Narrationen vom Menschen in Biomedizin, Kultur und Literatur (with Claudia Breger and Tanja Nusser, Berlin: Kulturverlag Kadmos, 2008) and Askese. Geschlecht und Geschichte der Selbstdisziplinierung (with Tanja Nusser, Bielefeld: Aisthesis, 2005). She is currently working on (scientific, artistic, and individual) narratives of dementia. 

 

Dr. Krüger-Fürhoff graduated from Cornell University with a degree in Comparative Literature, German Studies, and Business Administration before receiving her M.A. at the Freie Universitat Berlin and her PhD from Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. She taught at Universities in Berlin, Hamburg, Greifswald, Cincinnati (Max Kade Visiting Professor) and Bielefeld and has been working as a post-doctoral researcher at ZfL Berlin since 2010.

Education: 

2011  Habilitation (post-doctoral qualification) in German and Comparative Literature, Universität Bielefeld, Germany

2000  Ph.D. in German Literature, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany

1994  M.A. in Comparative Literature, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany

Language(s): 
English
Language(s): 
German

Gateways to the World: Germany in 5 Words

Subject Code: 
GERMAN
Course Number: 
88Q
Description: 

This course explores German history, culture and politics by tracing five (largely untranslatable) words and exploring the debates they have engendered in Germany over the past 200 years. This course is intended as preparation for students wishing to spend a quarter at the Bing Overseas Studies campus in Berlin, but is open to everyone. It fulfills the WRITE-2 requirement. Preference to sophomores.

Instructor: 
Adrian Daub
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3
Day/Time: 
TTh 10:00 AM - 11:30 PM

Matthew Wilson Smith

portrait:
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 204
mwsmith1@stanford.edu
978-604-5635

Office Hours: 
Tuesdays 9-11AM
Focal Group(s): 
Performance

Matthew Wilson Smith has previously held professorships at Boston University and Cornell University as well as visiting positions at Johannes Gutenberg-Universität (Mainz) and Columbia University.  His interests include modern theatre and performance, modernism and mass media, and relations among technology, science, and the arts.  His book The Total Work of Art: From Bayreuth to Cyberspace (2007) presents a history and theory of the Gesamtkunstwerk in relation to technology and mass culture, placing such diverse figures as Wagner, Moholy-Nagy, Brecht, Riefenstahl, Disney, Warhol, and contemporary cyber-artists within a genealogy of totalizing performance.  He is also the editor of Georg Büchner: The Major Works, which appeared as a Norton Critical Edition in 2011.  His current book project explores historical intersections between the performing arts and the neurological sciences and examines the construction of a “neural subject” over the course of the nineteenth century.  This project was recently supported by the Society for the Humanities at Cornell, where he served as a Fellow in 2012-13.  His plays have been performed at The Eugene O’Neill Theatre, The Ontological Theater at St. Mark’s, Henry Street Settlement, and other stages.

Education: 

B.A. Brown University, 1993

M.A. University of Chicago, 1995

M.A., Ph.D. Columbia University 2002

Language(s): 
German

Wrestling with Modernity: German Literature and Thought from 1900 to the Present

Subject Code: 
GERMAN
Course Number: 
222
Crosslisted as: 
GERMAN 322
Crosslisted as: 
COMPLIT 222A
Description: 
Masters of German 20th and 21st Century literature and philosophy as they present aesthetic innovation and confront the challenges of modern technology, social alienation, manmade catastrophes, and imagine the future. Readings include Nietzsche, Freud, Rilke, Musil, Brecht, Kafka, Doeblin, Benjamin, Juenger, Arendt, Musil, Mann, Adorno, Celan, Grass, Bachmann, Bernhardt, Wolf, and Kluge. Taught in English. Undergraduates enroll in 220 for 5 units, graduate students enroll in 320 for 8 units. UG Reqs: GER:DBHum
Instructor: 
Amir Eshel
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
5-8
Day/Time: 
F 2:15 PM - 5:05 PM

Dynasties, Dictators and Democrats: History and Politics in Germany

Subject Code: 
GERMAN
Course Number: 
132
Crosslisted as: 
COMPLIT 132A
Description: 

Key moments in German history through documents: personal accounts, political speeches and texts, and literary works. The course begins with the Prussian monarchy and proceeds to the crisis years of the French Revolution. Documents from the 1848 revolution and the age of Bismarck and German unification follow. World War I and its impact on Germany, including the rise of Hitler, as well as the aftermath -- a divided Germany in the Cold War through the fall of the Berlin Wall. Taught in German.

Instructor: 
Russell Berman
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
4
Day/Time: 
MW 8:30 AM - 9:45 AM

Music and Critical Theory

Subject Code: 
GERMAN
Course Number: 
310A
Crosslisted as: 
MUSIC 310A
Description: 

 

The seminar provides an opportunity to study some of the seminal texts of Critical Theory dealing with music. Concentrating on Theodor Adorno's writings on music, we will also include key philosophers who informed Adorno's thinking (in particular Kant, Hegel and Nietzsche), influential nineteenth-century aesthetics of music (Hoffmann, Schopenhauer and Hanslick), other contemporaries of Adorno (for example, Ernst Bloch), and some later authors whose work was influenced by the Frankfurt School (such as Carl Dahlhaus). We will also consider the impact of Critical Theory on recent scholarship. Weekly meetings will be organized around various topics, ranging from central concepts such as "Enlightenment" and "musical material" to individual composers. Music by Wagner, Mahler, Schoenberg, Stravinsky and Weill will feature prominently on the syllabus.
Instructor: 
Adrian Daub
Term: 
Spr
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
T 3:15 PM - 6:05 PM

Central European Literature

Subject Code: 
GERMAN
Course Number: 
218
Description: 

 

Central Europe is not a clearly defined region so much as an idea debated with particular intensity in the successor states of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy. Part reality part fantasy, "Central Europe" refers to a contested space between East and West, between cosmopolitanism and provincial narrowness, a space whose diversity has fostered cultural creativity, political conflict and utopian fantasy. Our survey will focus on fiction, memoires and essayistic commentary from the successor states of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy. It will comprise the dissolution of the empire, the interwar years, the Cold War decades and the postcommunist era. Attention to the predicament of small nations, "minor" literatures and cultural cross-pollination. Authors include Musil, Kafka, Roth, Kosztolányi, Márai, Hasek, Svevo, Kis, Torberg, Hrabal, Kundera, Esterházy, Magris. Discussion and readings in English.
Instructor: 
Márton Dornbach
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
4
Day/Time: 
M 1:15 PM - 4:05 PM

Post-Cold War German Foreign Policy

Subject Code: 
GERMAN
Course Number: 
264
Description: 

 

This course is devoted to Germany's role and policy in international relations since 1990. It is based on the premise that Germany's post-Cold War foreign policy was shaped by two potentially conflicting impulses which is historical learning versus the country's economic role and geopolitical position. The course's objective is to make students familiar with the overall conditions of German Foreign Policy in the post-Cold War era and to analyze related tensions and dilemmas. Empirical examples are Germany's role in the Yugoslavian wars in the first half of the 1990s, the transatlantic crisis over the Iraq war of 2003 and Germany's engagement in Afghanistan and German Foreign Policy during the country's tenure as a non-permanent member of the UN Security Council 2011-2012. Discussion in English; German reading knowledge required.
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
5
Day/Time: 
Th 2:15 PM - 5:05 PM

The Nervous Age: Neurosis, Neurology, and Nineteenth-century Theatre

Subject Code: 
GERMAN
Course Number: 
284
Crosslisted as: 
TAPS 354
Description: 

 

The nineteenth century witnessed profound developments in neurological and psychological sciences, developments that fundamentally altered conceptions of embodiment, agency, and mind. This course will place these scientific shifts in conversation with theatrical transformations of the period. We will read nineteenth-century neuropsychologists such as Charles Bell, Johannes Müller, George Miller Beard, Jean-Martin Charcot, and Hippolyte Bernheim alongside artists such as Percy Shelley, Georg Büchner, Richard Wagner, Émile Zola, and August Strindberg.
Instructor: 
Matthew Wilson Smith
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
5
Day/Time: 
TBA
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