French

Cynthia L. Haven

portrait: Cynthia Haven
Office Hours: 
by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics
 
Cynthia Haven is a literary and cultural journalist who has written for The Times Literary Supplement, The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, The San Francisco Chronicle, World Literature Today, The Kenyon Review, Georgia Review, Quarterly Conversation, and the Poetry Foundation. Her work has also appeared in Words Without Borders, The Cortland Review, Civilization, and other publications. Her An Invisible Rope: Portraits of Czesław Miłosz was published in 2011 by Ohio University Press/Swallow Press, Czeslaw Milosz: Conversations in 2006, and Joseph Brodsky: Conversations in 2003. Peter Dale in Conversation with Cynthia Haven was published in London, 2005.  She was a 2008 Milena Jesenská Fellow in Kraków with Vienna's Institut für die Wissenschaften vom Menschen. 
 
She is currently under contract to write a book about the life and work of René Girard.
 
She blogs at The Book Haven (http://bookhaven.stanford.edu).
 
.
Education: 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Language(s): 
French

Kristin Boyce

portrait: Kristin Boyce
Contact: 

Sweet Hall 218

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Curriculum Vitae: 

My primary research area is aesthetics. Within aesthetics, the three media I am most concerned to explore are literature, the performing arts (especially dance and theater) and the visual arts (especially film). My research with respect to these three media hangs together in two ways. The first is methodological. I try to show that philosophical questions which arise with respect to them do not admit of general solutions—that finding satisfying solutions depends on taking account of the unique possibilities specific to each of these media, taken individually. Second, many of the topics that most interest me cluster around the following four issues: 1) the relation between form and content, 2) the question of what it means for a representation to be “realistic”; 3) the philosophical problem of modernism, where I take modernism to be the condition an art enters when it enters the condition of philosophy; and 4) questions concerning the limits of representation as they arise within each of these three media. In each instance, my research with respect to these topics specifically within the field of aesthetics proper broadens out to questions which bear on topics in ethics, philosophy of action, and the history of early analytic philosophy. I am currently working on two articles about dance, one article about artistic intention, and one book about philosophy and literature which grows out of my dissertation research, "Why Wander into Fiction? The Role of Reflection Upon Literature within the Analytic Philosophical Tradition."

Education: 

PhD, University of Chicago, Philosophy

MA,  The University of Chicago Divinity School, Religion and Literature

BA, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Mathematics and Religious Studies

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German

Suzie Telep

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Language(s): 
French

Sarah Wilson

portrait: Sarah Wilson
Contact: 

swilson8@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Performance
Education: 

Dartmouth College Bachelors in Russian and Government cum laude, 2008. Honors Thesis: Victor Pelevin's Feminist Polemic. Awards: ORL Senior Scholar, Cloise Appleton Crane Prize, Pray Modern Language Prize in Russian

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Russian
Language(s): 
Ukrainian

Renren Yang

portrait: Renren Yang

Renren Yang began his doctoral studies in the Department of Comparative Literature at Stanford in 2011 Autumn. He was born in Xiangtan, China and received his M.A. and B.A. in English Literature and a B.L. (Double Degree) in Sociology from Peking University. He is interested in 20th-century Chinese, British and American fictions and their cinema adaptations, particularly their ethical implication and gender/sexuality (re)presentation. He focuses on the integrative employment of stylistics, narratology and sociological theories in literary interpretation. He is also fond of Chinese cooking (Hunan Cuisine) and calligraphy (style of Liu Gong-Quan of the Tang Dynasty).

Education: 

2011:   M.A., English Literature, Peking University
Thesis: "Complicated Ethics of Sincerity in Joseph Conrad’s The Secret Agent" (Adviser: Prof. Dan Shen)

2008:   B.A., English Literature, Peking University; B.L. (Double Degree), Sociology, Peking University
Thesis: "Focalization and Confinement: Reading Mansfield’s Three Stories about Characters’ Psychology" (Adviser: Prof. Dan Shen)

LANGUAGES:
 
Mandarin, English, French, Cantonese

 PUBLICATIONS:  

(Co-author) “Between Languages, Hither or Thither?—A Study of the Use of English and Academic Identities of Chinese Scholars in the Humanities and Social Sciences”, in Linguistic Research (Issue 7), Institute of Linguistics and Applied Linguistics of Peking University, ed. Beijing: Higher Education Press, 2009: 181-90.

 CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS: 

“To Seek and To be Sought: Transcripts Intersection in Zhao Zhenkai’s ‘13 Happiness Street’,” the First Annual East Asian Studies Symposium, the Dept. of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford, June 2012.

“Literary Depiction and Film Adaptations of the Balcony Scene in Romeo and Juliet”, The Twelfth Annual British Graduate Shakespeare Conference, the Shakespeare Institute at the University of Birmingham, Stratford-upon-Avon, June 2010.

“The Philosophy of ‘Unity of Being’ in Yeats’s Poems”, Conference on “Sino-Irish Relations: 1979-2009”, the Embassy of Ireland and Beijing Foreign Studies University, Beijing, December 2009.

“‘The Dead’: A Comparative Study of the Ambivalent Images in the Story and the Film”, “Irish Literature Symposium”, The Institute of Comparative Literature and World Literature at Peking University, Beijing, November 2007.

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Chinese
Language(s): 
English for Foreign Students

André Fischer

portrait: André Fischer
Contact: 

fschr@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Education: 

M.A. in German Studies, Comparative Literature and Modern History at Universität Potsdam and TU Berlin

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German

Christopher Renna

portrait: Isaac Bleaman
Office Hours: 
by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Education: 

Research Masters Degree, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales à Paris

BA in both French and English literature, UCLA

Certificat des Etudes Politiques, Institut d'Etudes Politiques, Grenoble

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Spanish

Fatoumata Seck

portrait: Fatoumata Seck
Contact: 

fseck@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish

Literature, Revolutions, and Changes in 19th- and 20th-Century France

Subject Code: 
FRENCH
Course Number: 
132
Description: 

 

This course will explore several of the most important texts of 19th and 20th century French literature. The aim of the course will be understanding stylistic and thematic experimentation in its historical/cultural context, with a focus on the theme of transgression – moral, political, and social. We will read works in all major literary genres (poetry, prose, and drama) and will discuss prominent movements such as Realism, Romanticism, Symbolism, Decadentism, and Existentialism through the works that best define them. Readings include Constant, Balzac, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Rimbaud, Flaubert, Maupassant, Jarry, Gide, Apollinaire, Breton, Yourcenar, Sartre. All readings, discussion, and assignments are in French. UG Reqs: GER:DBHum
Instructor: 
Dylan J. Montanari
Term: 
Aut
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
4
Day/Time: 
MW 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Absolutism, Enlightenment, and Revolution in 17th- and 18th-Century France

Subject Code: 
FRENCH
Course Number: 
131
Description: 

 

The literature, culture, and politics of France from Louis XIV to Olympe de Gouges. How this period produced the political and philosophical foundations of modernity. Readings include Corneille, Molière, Racine, Lafayette, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Beaumarchais, and Gouges. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor. UG Reqs: GER:DBHum
Instructor: 
Jean-Marie Apostolidès
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
4
Day/Time: 
MW 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
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