French

Science, Technology, and Society in the Face of the Looming Disaster

Subject Code: 
FRENCH
Course Number: 
228
Crosslisted as: 
ITALIAN 228
Crosslisted as: 
POLISCI 233F
Description: 

The major topic will be the indeterminacy regarding the survival of humankind. With the advent of the atomic bomb humankind became potentially the maker of its own demise. Will combine a number of significant case studies (environmental disasters, industrial catastrophes, threat of nuclear devastation, technological risks) with the lessons drawn from a form of literature that is at the intersection of STS and the Humanities, in particular the early warnings made by such thinkers as Ivan Illich, Martin Heidegger, Hans Jonas, Günther Anders, and Hannah Arendt. Taught in English. 

Instructor: 
Jean-Pierre Dupuy
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Day/Time: 
T 2:15p-5:05p

Parisian cultures of the 19th & Early 20th Century: Romanticism to Cubism

Subject Code: 
FRENCH
Course Number: 
190Q
Description: 

Preference to sophomores. Political, social, and cultural events in Paris from the Napoleonic era and the Romantic revolution to the 30s. The arts and letters of bourgeois, popular, and avant garde cultures. Illustrated with slides. Taught in English.

Instructor: 
Marc Bertrand
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Day/Time: 
T 3:15p-5:05p

Religion, The Self, and Society in 20th-century French Novels and Film

Subject Code: 
FRENCH
Course Number: 
125
Description: 

Survey course on religion, the self, and society in 20th-century French novels and film.  Readings may include: Gide, Camus, and Bernanos for the novels, and films by Robert Bresson and others. Taught in French. 

Instructor: 
Jason Lewallen
Term: 
Aut
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Day/Time: 
MW 9:30a-10:45a

French Theatromania: From the great classics to private theater in 17th & 18th Century France

Subject Code: 
FRENCH
Course Number: 
145
Description: 

For French majors and minors.  Explore the French passion for theater in the 17th and 18th centuries, from the great classics to private theater. A selection of plays from the official and the private repertory will be used to illustrate the evolution of French theater as a genre and to discuss its role in the sociopolitical shifts of the period. All readings, discussions, and assignments will be in French.

Instructor: 
Maria Teodora Comsa
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Day/Time: 
MW 1:15p-2:05p

Understanding and Staging Molière Theatre

Subject Code: 
FRENCH
Course Number: 
316
Crosslisted as: 
Drama 368S
Description: 

Devoted to an in depth analysis of Molière's major plays, as well as a study of contemporary productions of his work. Taught in French.

Instructor: 
Jean-Marie Apostolidès
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Day/Time: 
W 2:15p-5:05p

Writing, Memory, and Self-Fashioning

Subject Code: 
ITALIAN
Course Number: 
251
Crosslisted as: 
FRENCH 251
Description: 

Writing is not a mere recording of the past, but a selection and reinvention of our experiences. We will look at how writing is central to the philosophical project of fashioning the self, even as it reveals that much of what we call the self is a fictional construct. Materials include fiction and memoirs (Primo Levi, Michel Tournier, Melania Mazzucco, Jonathan Littell), and theoretical works in philosophy (Bergson, James, Freud, Jung, Derrida, Wyschogrod, Nehamas), psycholinguistics, and neuroscience. Taught in English.

Instructor: 
Laura Wittman
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Day/Time: 
T 2:15p-5:05p

The Renaissance Body in French Literature and Medicine

Subject Code: 
FRENCH
Course Number: 
219/319
Description: 

If the Renaissance is famous for discovering unknown continents and ancient texts the body too was a new territory of conquest. How did literature respond to the rise of an anatomical gaze in the arts and in medicine and how did it stage the aesthetic religious philosophical and moral issues related to such a promotion or deconstruction of the body? Does literature aim at representing the body or does it use it instead as a ubiquitous signifier for intellectual emotional and political ideas? The locus of desire, pleasure and disease, the body also functioned as a reminder of human mortality and was caught in the web of gender issues, religious controversies and new norms of behavior. Texts from prose fiction (Rabelais) poetry (Scève Ronsard Labé D’Aubigné) essays (Montaigne) and emblem literature. Extra documents include music scores tapestries paintings philosophical and anatomical plates from medical treatises. Taught in English. Visit the Web site: renaissancebodyproject.stanford.edu

Instructor: 
Cécile Alduy
Term: 
Aut
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Day/Time: 
Th 2:15p-5:05p

Nation in Motion: Film, Race and Immigration in Contemporary French Cinema

Subject Code: 
FRENCH
Course Number: 
65N
Crosslisted as: 
CSRE 65N
Description: 

An examination of the current debates in France regarding national identity, secularism, and the integration of immigrants, notably from the former colonies. Confronts films' and other media's visual and discursive rhetorical strategies used to represent ethnic or religious minorities, discrimination, citizens' resistance to government policies, inter-racial marriages, or women's rights within immigrant communities. By embodying such themes in stories of love, hardships, or solidarity, the motion pictures make the movements and emotions inherent to immigration tangible: to what effect? Taught in French. Films in French with English subtitles. 

Instructor: 
Cécile Alduy
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Day/Time: 
M 5:15p-7:45p; W 11:00a-12:50p

Nation in Motion: Film, Race and Immigration in Contemporary French Cinema

Subject Code: 
FRENCH
Course Number: 
235/335
Description: 

An examination of the current debates in France regarding national identity, secularism, and the integration of immigrants, notably from the former colonies. Course confronts films' and other media's visual and discursive rhetorical strategies used to represent ethnic or religious minorities, discrimination, citizens' resistance to government policies, inter-racial marriages, or women's rights within immigrant communities. By embodying such themes in stories of love, hardships, or solidarity, the motion pictures make the movements and emotions inherent to immigration tangible: to what effect? Taught in English. Films in French with English subtitles. Consent of instructor for undergraduates.

Instructor: 
Cécile Alduy
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Day/Time: 
M 5:15p-7:45p; Th 2:15p-5:05p

Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance French Literature

Subject Code: 
FRENCH
Course Number: 
130
Description: 

 

Introduction to the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. The birth of a national literature and its evolution. Literature as addressing cultural, philosophical, and artistic issues which question assumptions on love, ethics, art, and the nature of the self. Readings: epics (La Chanson de Roland), medieval romances (Tristan, Chrétien de Troyes' Yvain), post-Petrarchan poetics (Du Bellay, Ronsard, Labé), and prose humanists (Rabelais, Montaigne). Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor. UG Reqs: GER:DBHum
Instructor: 
Marisa Galvez
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
4
Day/Time: 
TTh 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
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