French

Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht

portrait: DLCL Admin
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 112
sepp@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Contact Margaret Tompkins, tompkins@stanford.edu, 723-1356

 

Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht is the Albert Guérard Professor in Literature in the Departments of Comparative Literature and of French & Italian (and by courtesy, he is affiliated with the Department of Iberian and Latin American Cultures/ILAC, the Department of German Studies, and the Program in Modern Thought & Literature). As a scholar, Gumbrecht focuses on the histories of the national literatures in Romance language (especially French, Spanish, and Brazilian), but also on German literature, while, at the same time, he teaches and writes about the western philosophical tradition (almost exclusively on non-analytic philosophy) with an emphasis on French and German nineteenth- and twentieth-century texts. In addition, Gumbrecht tries to analyze and to understand forms of aesthetic experience 21st-century everyday culture. Over the past forty years, he has published more than sixteen hundred texts, including books, translated into more than twenty languages. In Europe and in South America, Gumbrecht has a presence as a public intellectual; whereas, in the academic world, he has been acknowledged by nine honorary doctorates in six different countries: Canada, Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Portugal, and Russia . He has also held a number of visiting professorships, at the Collège de France, Zeppelin Universität (Friedrichshafen), University of Manchester, and the Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, among others.

Since the beginning of the academic year 2011-2012, Gumbrecht has laid the foundation for a new book that will try to make present for twenty-first century readers the life and works of the French Enlightenment philosopher Denis Diderot (1713-1784) in a new way. On one hand, this project takes on the challenge of how certain passions and the mood of certain environments in Diderot’s life can be made present in the most immediate way for contemporary readers -- referring, for example, to Diderot’s obsession with defining what a “perfectly happy day” would be, or to the physical and social challenge of his several-month stay at the Court of Catherine the Great at St. Petersburg, late in his life. On the other hand, and in contrast to Voltaire and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Diderot’s life will be presented as part of a genealogy of the present-day intellectual, with the implication that, due to a specific “openness to the world,” the twenty-first century may become Diderot’s century as much as the twentieth century was Voltaire’s, and, probably, the nineteenth century, Rousseau’s

Education: 

 

(including assistant professorships)

1974: Venia Legendi (Habilitation) Allgemeine und Romanische Literaturwissenschaft Universität Konstanz
1972: Universita degli studi di Pavia
1971-1974: Universität Konstanz

1971: Ph.D. Universität Konstanz

1970-1971: Universität München
1969-1970: Universidad de Salamanca
1969: Universität Regensburg 

1967-1969: Universität München
1967: Abitur, Siebold Gymnasium Würzburg

1966: Lyceé Henri IV, Paris
1958-1967: Siebold Gymnasium Würzburg

Language(s): 
French

Margaret Cohen

portrait: DLCL Admin
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 211
Phone: 650 724 0106
macohen@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Tu 3:00-4:00

 

Please email comparativelit@stanford.edu to schedule a meeting with Professor Cohen or ask questions regarding the undergraduate major/minor.

Margaret Cohen’s most recent book is The Novel and the Sea (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010), which was awarded the Louis R. Gottschalk Prize from the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and the George and Barbara Perkins Prize from the International Society for the Study of the Narrative. She is also the author of Profane Illumination: Walter Benjamin and the Paris of Surrealist Revolution (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993) and The Sentimental Education of the Novel (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999), which received the Modern Language Association's Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione prize in French and Francophone literature. In addition, Margaret Cohen coedited two collections of scholarship on the European novel: The Literary Channel: The Inter-National Invention of the Novel with Carolyn Dever (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002), andSpectacles of Realism: Body, Gender, Genre with Christopher Prendergast (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1995). She edited and translated Sophie Cottin's best-selling novel of 1799, Claire d'Albe (New York: Modern Language Association, 2003), and has edited a new critical edition of Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary that appeared with W.W. Norton in 2004.

Education: 

1988: Ph.D., Yale University
1982: M.A., New York University

1980-81: Universität Konstanz
1980: B.A., Yale University

Language(s): 
French

Gerald Gillespie

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Italian
Language(s): 
Spanish

Raphaël Canvat

portrait: Raphaël Canvat
Office Hours: 
by appointment
Language(s): 
English
Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German

Carolina Martes

portrait: Carolina Martes
Contact: 

cmartes@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Education: 

BA, Comparative Literature & Society, Columbia University (2012)

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish

Mari Amend

portrait:
Contact: 

mcamend@stanford.edu

Language(s): 
English
Language(s): 
French

Chloe Edmondson

portrait: Chloe Edmondson
Contact: 

cmhse14@stanford.edu

Language(s): 
English
Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Italian

Emma Marion Wood

portrait: Emma  Wood
Contact: 

emmaw@stanford.edu

Education: 

High School: Catlin Gabel (Portland, OR)

 

Williams College (2010-2011)

Stanford University (2011-present, expected graduation 2015)

 

Other programs:

John Cabot University in Rome, Italy (2009-2010)

CET Intensive Italian program in Catania, Sicily (2011)

Stanford study abroad in Paris (2012-2013)

Guild of Sommelier Certified Sommelier (2013)

WSET Advanced Certification in Wine & Spirits (2013)

Currently in the WSET Diploma in Wines & Spirits program (expected graduation 2014)

Language(s): 
English
Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Italian

Elena Mireille Stephenson

portrait: Karol Berger
Contact: 

stelena@stanford.edu

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Italian
Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish

Vivian T. Wong

Contact: 

vtwong13@gmail.com

As my undergraduate career wraps up, I’m feeling the pressure to tie all loose ends, to know where I’m going after- wards and, essentially, to understand life. Needless to say, I’m more frayed than ever before. Graduation is a time to celebrate one’s progress, but progress is usually not as linear as one wishes. The true markers of progress, in my opinion, are the relationships you cultivate and the experiences you collect—both of which help you develop as a person.

I want to give due credit to a dear friend I’ve known for ten years. I started studying the French language in seventh grade—on a whim that gradually became a passion. Not the fleeting kind, but the sort that recycles, refuels and revitalizes. Already majoring in International Relations, I declared a second major in French after I returned from studying in Paris during my junior year. Paris is as cliché as reputed: its beauty revealed the world’s beauty and—cringe—my beauty within. After taking political science and economics courses, it was refreshing to read La Fontaine’s fables, theater pieces about the game of love by Marivaux, all of Balzac’s minute details, and the political philosophy of Rousseau.

My two majors complement one another, one giving the other reason and the other providing meaning.

I am grateful for the opportunity to pursue both because, admittedly, I have the tendency to romanticize in my pursuit of reason—just as I’m inclined to use logic to rationalize my dreams. Like Baudelaire, I am obsessed with irony and paradox. Baudelaire, flâneur par excellence, taught me the French verb flâner—which means, as I under- stand it, to wander, to explore, to walk with no aim but to appreciate life. The irony of wandering aimlessly as an aim may be comparable to carrying out 10-year plans depleted of passion— but I find the former more enjoyable and ultimately rewarding. Once over coffee, Professor Jean-Marie Apostolidés told me, “The search for stability will give you instability”—a wisdom that will forever echo in my mind.

For the next few years, I’d love to travel, study for the LSAT, work in a flower shop, finally build a website for my pho- tography, and continue my devotion to public service, particularly advocat- ing for underserved communities. It is good to plan and to see how things fit into the bigger picture. However, life is often ironic—and studying French has prepared me to enjoy the unexpected detours that, for me, have created the best memories.

Education: 

B.A. in French and International Relations

Language(s): 
French
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