French

Joshua Landy

portrait: Joshua Landy
Contact: 

104 Pigott Hall
650 723 4914
landy@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Variable. Information and signup form at <a>http://jloh.pbworks.com</a>.
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Curriculum Vitae: 

Joshua Landy is the Andrew B. Hammond Professor in French Language, Literature and Civilization, Professor of Comparative Literature and by courtesy, English, and co-director of the Literature and Philosophy Initiative at Stanford.

Professor Landy is the author of Philosophy as Fiction: Self, Deception, and Knowledge in Proust (Oxford, 2004) and of How To Do Things with Fictions (Oxford, 2012). He is also the co-editor of two volumes, Thematics: New Approaches (SUNY, 1995, with Claude Bremond and Thomas Pavel) and The Re-Enchantment of the World: Secular Magic in a Rational Age (Stanford, 2009, with Michael Saler). Philosophy as Fiction deals with issues of self-knowledge, self-deception, and self-fashioning in Proust's A la recherche du temps perdu, while raising the question of what literary form contributes to an engagement with such questions; How to Do Things with Fictions explores a series of texts (by Plato, Beckett, Mallarmé, and Mark) that function as training-grounds for the mental capacities.

Professor Landy has appeared on the NPR shows "Forum" and "Philosophy Talk" (on narrative selfhood and on the function of fiction) and has on various occasions been a guest host of Robert Harrison's "Entitled Opinions" (with Lera Boroditsky on Language and Thought, with Michael Saler on Re-Enchantment, with John Perry and Ken Taylor on the Uses of Philosophy, and with Alexander Nehamas on Beauty).

Professor Landy has received the Walter J. Gores Award for Teaching Excellence (1999) and the Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching (2001).

Language(s): 
French

Marisa Galvez

portrait: Marisa Galvez
Contact: 

134 Pigott Hall
650 723 1918
mgalvez@stanford.edu

Office Hours: By appointment

Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

 

Marisa Galvez specializes in the literature of the Middle Ages in France and Western Europe, especially the poetry and narrative literature written in Occitan and Old French.  Her areas of interest include the troubadours, vernacular poetics, the intersection of performance and literary cultures, and the critical history of medieval studies as a discipline. At Stanford, she currently teaches courses on medieval and Renaissance French literature and love lyric, as well as interdisciplinary upper level courses on the medieval imaginary in modern literature, film, and art.

Her recent book, Songbook: How Lyrics Became Poetry in Medieval Europe (University of Chicago Press, 2012), treats what poetry was before the emergence of the modern category, “poetry”: that is, how vernacular songbooks of the thirteenth to fifteenth centuries shaped our modern understanding of poetry by establishing expectations of what is a poem, what is a poet, and what is lyric poetry itself.  The first comparative study of songbooks, the book concerns three vernacular traditions—Occitan, Middle High German, and Castilian—and analyzes how the songbook emerged from its original performance context of oral publication, into a medium for preservation, and finally became a literary object that performs the interests of poets and readers.  Her current research project, tentatively entitled "The Subject of Crusade: Penitential Poetics in Vernacular Lyric and Romance" examines how the crusader subject of vernacular literature sought to reconcile secular ideals about love and chivalry with crusade.  This study places this literature in dialogue with new ideas about penance and confession that emerged from the second half of the twelfth century to the end of the thirteenth.

Forthcoming publications include "The Voice of the Unrepentant Crusader: 'Aler m'estuet' by the Châtelain d'Arras" (Voice and Voicelessness in Medieval Europe, ed. Irit Kleinman, Palgrave) that analyzes how a crusaders poet's unrepentant voice can be viewed as in tension with the confessional voice of pastoral literature, and "The Intersubjective Performance of Confession vs. Courtly Profession" (Performance and Theatricality in the MIddle Ages and Renaissance, ed. Markus Cruse, ACMRS) that compares penitential performativity and witnessing in courtly lyric and moral tales.  

Her multi-year Performing Trobar project seeks to cultivate, historicize, and compare the experience of troubadour lyrics in literary and performative modes. In exposing students and the Stanford community to the rich aural and verbal texture of the medieval world, Performing Trobar seeks to animate our engagement with medieval lyric both as a philological artifact and as a vernacular art that continues to be translated before various audiences around the world. She also currently serves on the Executive Committee for the Discussion Group on Provençal Language and Literature of the Modern Language Association and acts as Faculty Coordinator of the Theoretical Perspectives of the Middle Ages workshop at the Stanford Humanities Center. 

Troubadours Art Ensemble: Stanford Visit from SiCa on Vimeo.

Education: 

2007 Ph.D in Comparative Literature, Stanford University
1999 B.A. in French, Yale University

Language(s): 
French

Jean-Pierre Dupuy

portrait:
Contact: 

111 Pigott Hall
650 723 4713
jpdupuy@stanford.edu

Professor Jean-Pierre Dupuy is a Professor of Social and Political Philosophy at the École Polytechnique, Paris. He is the Director of research at the C.N.R.S. (Philosophy) and the Director of C.R.E.A. (Centre de Recherche en Épistémologie Appliquée), the philosophical research group of the École Polytechnique, which he founded in 1982. At Stanford University, he is a researcher at the Study of Language and Information (C.S.L.I.) Professor Dupuy is by courtesy a Professor of Political Science.

In his book The Mechanization of the Mind, Jean-Pierre Dupuy explains how the founders of cybernetics laid the foundations not only for cognitive science, but also artificial intelligence, and foreshadowed the development of chaos theory, complexity theory, and other scientific and philosophical breakthroughs.

Education: 

1964-1966: Ecole des Mines de Paris
1960-1962: Ecole Polytechnique
Admitted to le Corps des Mines
July 1960: Ecole Polytechnique and Ecole Normale Supérieure (Ulm-sciences)

Language(s): 
French

Marc Bertrand

portrait:
Contact: 

bertrand@stanford.edu

 Professor Marc Bertrand was raised in France and obtained his Ph.D. in Romance Languages at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of L'Oeuvre de Jean Prevost and editor, contributor, and co-author of a number of other publications concerning French and cultural history. He is working on Le Roman du bâtard, a book on the contemporary French novel. A recent essay in French Cultural Studies, "L'Ecrit et l'image populaires dans les études d'histoire culturelle," advocated the inclusion of new material from popular culture in the teaching of French cultural history. Professor Bertrand loves Paris past and present, and he has participated in the Stanford in Paris program, lecturing on contemporary French society and culture.

Language(s): 
French

Jean-Marie Apostolidès

portrait:
Contact: 

106 Pigott Hall
650 723 4460
aposto@stanford.edu

Professor Apostolidès was educated in France, where he received a doctorate in literature and the social sciences. He taught psychology in Canada for seven years and sociology in France for three years. In 1980 he came to the United States, teaching at Harvard and then Stanford, primarily French classical literature (the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries) and drama. He is interested in avant-garde artistic movements such as dada, surrealism, and situationist international; as well as the theory of image, literary theory, and Francophone literature. He is also a playwright, whose work has been staged in Paris, Montreal, and New York.

Professor Apostolidès has served as chair of the Department of French and Italian and as executive editor of the Stanford French Review and the Stanford Literature Review.

His literary criticism focuses on the place of artistic production in the French classical age and in modern society. Whether it be the place of court pageantry during the reign of King Louis XIV (Le Roi-Machine, 1981), or the role of theater under the ancien régime (Le Prince Sacrificié, 1985), or even the importance of mass culture in the 1950s (Les Métamorphoses de Tintin, 1984), in each case Professor Apostolidès analyzes a specific cultural product both in its original context and in the context of the contemporary world. His most recent books are Les Tombeaux de Guy Debord in 1999, L'Audience in 2001, Traces, Revers, Ecarts in 2002, Sade in The Abyss in 2003, Héroïsme et victimisation in 2003, Hergé et le mythe du Surenfant in 2004. The tools required for such analysis are borrowed from literary criticism and from the social sciences, particularly psychoanalysis, anthropology, and sociology.

In his books, Professor Apostolidès interprets the works of the past as witnesses of our intellectual and emotional life. His examination of the distant or near past seeks to make us more sensitive to the social changes that are taking place now, in order to improve our understanding of the direction in which contemporary society is moving.

Click here to read Professor Apostolides' Montreal interview with Alexandre Trudel.

Language(s): 
French

Cécile Alduy

portrait: Cécile Alduy
Contact: 

110 Pigott Hall 
alduy@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
By appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Digital Humanities
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Renaissances

Professor Alduy works primarily on French Literature, the history of the body and its representations, and the long and short-term cultural history of gender, letters and politics in France. Areas of interests includes the history and mythology of national and ethnic identities since the Renaissance, the intersection between cultural, literary and medical discourses on gender and the body, poetry and poetics, narrative forms and their discontent, French cinema and contemporary French literature.

Prof. Alduy maintains a blog on contemporary culture, technology, and literature on Arcade and is a contributor to the New Yorker's blog, the Los Angeles Review of Books, the Boston Review,  Zyzzyvas, and the San Francisco Chronicle.

Her new research project is called "Identity Politics: Marine Le Pen and the Makeover of the National Front in France."

Her last book is The Politics of Love: Poetics and Genesis of the "Amours" in Renaissance France (1549-1560) (Geneva: Droz, 2007). It  examines how the poetics of French Petrarchan love collections was exploited by the generation of Ronsard and Du Bellay to promote a nationalist agenda, that of a "Defense and Illustration of the French Tongue" and its cultural supremacy.

She has published extensively on the works of Marot, Scève, Du Bellay, Ronsard, Louise Labé, La Boétie, Montaigne, Rabelais, and Philippe Jaccottet among others. Her publications also include a revised critical edition of Maurice Scève's Délie (Paris: STFM, 2001) and a comprehensive study of all works written by or on Scève from his lifetime to the present (Maurice Scève. Roma: Memini, 2006). She has served as guest editor of two collected volumes: a special issue of Réforme Humanisme Renaissance entitled "Licences et censures poétiques. La littérature érotique et pornographique vernaculaire à la Renaissance" (vol. 69, 2009); and the proceedings of the 2008 interdisciplinary conference Between Experience and Experiment In The Early Modern World, co-edited with Roland Greene and published in Republic of Letters (2010).

In recent work, she expands the traditional field of Renaissance poetics by exploring new areas of inquiry: multi-authored collections as polemical proto-media (The Anatomical Blazons); the intersection between the emerging field of obstetrics, its book market, and the pre-history of obscenity and pornography ("Archeology of a Close-up"); the instability of gender in male and female lyrics ("The Anatomy of Gender"); or the economy of poetic production ("Self-Sustainable Economies," RQ. 2010).

Prof. Alduy was the Director of the Center of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (CMEMS) from 2010 to 2013.

Education: 

2003: Docteur ès Lettres (Ph. D.), University of Reims, France - cum laude
1999: D.E.A., French Literature, University of Paris III - Sorbonne Nouvelle, cum laude
1994-1999: École Normale Supérieure (Ulm), Paris, France.
1997: Agrégation de Lettres Modernes (Rank: 2nd)
1996: Maîtrise (B.A.), Paris VII - Sorbonne Nouvelle

Advisees: 

Greg Haake

Cici Malik

Fatoumata Seck

Cécile Treisfels

Language(s): 
French

Elisabeth Mudimbe-Boyi

portrait: Beverly Allen
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 107
Phone: 650 723 1947
boyi@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
By appointment only
Curriculum Vitae: 

Professor Elisabeth Mudimbe-Boyi is affiliated with both the French and Italian and Comparative Literature departments. Her teaching and research interests include cultural relations between Europe, Africa and the Caribbean; literature, intellectuals and society; and women writers. Before coming to Stanford in 1995, Professor Boyi taught at universities in the Congo and Burundi, as well as Haverford College and Duke University. She was a Visiting Professor in the French Department of the Graduate Center, CUNY in 1994. In 1999-2000 Professor Boyi was a Fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center. In 2002-2003 Professor Boyi was the president of the African Literature Association, a non-profit society of scholars dedicated to the advancement of African Literary Studies. She served as a member of the Executive Council of the Modern Language Association, where she represents the field of French (2003-2006), and as the Director of the interdisciplinary Program in Modern Thought and Literature at Stanford (2005-2008).

Among Mudimbe-Boyi's publications are Jacques-Stephen Alexis: une écriture poétique, un engagement politique, "Post-Colonial Women Writing in French;" Beyond Dichotomies: Histories, Identities, Culture, and the Challenge of Globalization (2002); and Remembering Africa (2002); Her latest book, Essais sur les cultures en contact - Afrique, Amériques, Europe was published by Karthala (Paris) in September 2006.

Education: 

Professor Boyi studied Romance Philology at the Catholic Universities of Louvain (Belgium) and Lovanium, Kinshasa. She holds a Licence en Philosophie et Lettres from the Catholic University of Lovanium (groupe Philologie Romane) and a Ph.D. in Romance Languages and Literatures: French and Italian (Doctorat en Langues et Littératures Romanes) from the National University of Zaïre in Lubumbashi, with honors (Grande Distinction). Before earning her Ph.D., Professor Boyi studied ethnology at the University of Paris-Nanterre. She also studied Portuguese at the University of Lisbon, Italian language and literature at the Catholic University of Milan and the University of Siena, and at the University of Brescia, where she was a language teaching intern at CLADIL, the Centro di Linguistica applicata e didattica della lingua.

Language(s): 
French

Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht

portrait:
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 112
sepp@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Contact Margaret Tompkins, tompkins@stanford.edu, 723-1356

Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht is the Albert Guérard Professor in Literature in the Departments of Comparative Literature and of French & Italian (and by courtesy, he is affiliated with the Department of Iberian and Latin American Cultures/ILAC, the Department of German Studies, and the Program in Modern Thought & Literature). As a scholar, Gumbrecht focuses on the histories of the national literatures in Romance language (especially French, Spanish, and Brazilian), but also on German literature, while, at the same time, he teaches and writes about the western philosophical tradition (almost exclusively on non-analytic philosophy) with an emphasis on French and German nineteenth- and twentieth-century texts. In addition, Gumbrecht tries to analyze and to understand forms of aesthetic experience 21st-century everyday culture. Over the past forty years, he has published more than sixteen hundred texts, including books, translated into more than twenty languages. In Europe and in South America, Gumbrecht has a presence as a public intellectual; whereas, in the academic world, he has been acknowledged by nine honorary doctorates in six different countries: Canada, Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Portugal, and Russia . He has also held a number of visiting professorships, at the Collège de France, Zeppelin Universität (Friedrichshafen), University of Manchester, and the Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, among others.

Since the beginning of the academic year 2011-2012, Gumbrecht laid the foundation for a new book that will try to make present for twenty-first century readers the life and works of the French Enlightenment philosopher Denis Diderot (1713-1784) in a new way. On one hand, this project takes on the challenge of how certain passions and the mood of certain environments in Diderot’s life can be made present in the most immediate way for contemporary readers -- referring, for example, to Diderot’s obsession with defining what a “perfectly happy day” would be, or to the physical and social challenge of his several-month stay at the Court of Catherine the Great at St. Petersburg, late in his life. On the other hand, and in contrast to Voltaire and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Diderot’s life will be presented as part of a genealogy of the present-day intellectual, with the implication that, due to a specific “openness to the world,” the twenty-first century may become Diderot’s century as much as the twentieth century was Voltaire’s, and, probably, the nineteenth century, Rousseau’s

Education: 

(including assistant professorships)

1974: Venia Legendi (Habilitation) Allgemeine und Romanische Literaturwissenschaft Universität Konstanz
1972: Universita degli studi di Pavia
1971-1974: Universität Konstanz

1971: Ph.D. Universität Konstanz

1970-1971: Universität München
1969-1970: Universidad de Salamanca
1969: Universität Regensburg 

1967-1969: Universität München
1967: Abitur, Siebold Gymnasium Würzburg

1966: Lyceé Henri IV, Paris
1958-1967: Siebold Gymnasium Würzburg

Language(s): 
French

Margaret Cohen

portrait: Beverly Allen
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 211
Phone: 650 724 0106
macohen@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Tues 3:00-4:00 (sign-up sheet at room 260-211) or by appointment

Please email comparativelit@stanford.edu to schedule a meeting with Professor Cohen or ask questions regarding the undergraduate major/minor.

Margaret Cohen’s most recent book is The Novel and the Sea (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010), which was awarded the Louis R. Gottschalk Prize from the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and the George and Barbara Perkins Prize from the International Society for the Study of the Narrative. She is also the author of Profane Illumination: Walter Benjamin and the Paris of Surrealist Revolution (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993) and The Sentimental Education of the Novel (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999), which received the Modern Language Association's Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione prize in French and Francophone literature. In addition, Margaret Cohen coedited two collections of scholarship on the European novel: The Literary Channel: The Inter-National Invention of the Novel with Carolyn Dever (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002), andSpectacles of Realism: Body, Gender, Genre with Christopher Prendergast (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1995). She edited and translated Sophie Cottin's best-selling novel of 1799, Claire d'Albe (New York: Modern Language Association, 2003), and has edited a new critical edition of Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary that appeared with W.W. Norton in 2004.

Education: 

1988: Ph.D., Yale University
1982: M.A., New York University

1980-81: Universität Konstanz
1980: B.A., Yale University

Language(s): 
French
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