English

Dante's Purgatorio and Paradiso

Subject Code: 
ITALIAN
Course Number: 
236E
Description: 

 

Reading the second and third canticles of Dante's Divine Comedy. Prerequisite: students must have read Dante's Inferno in a course or on their own. Taught in English. Recommended: reading knowledge of Italian.
Instructor: 
Robert Pogue Harrison
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
4-5
Day/Time: 
M 2:15 PM - 5:05 PM

Italo Calvino: Literature, Science, Philosophy

Subject Code: 
ITALIAN
Course Number: 
221
Description: 

 

The course will follow the development of Italo Calvino's literary career, with a particular focus on his interest in fantastical and meta-fictional forms of narrative. Readings of Calvino's literary works, such as Cosmicomics, Invisible Cities, and Mr. Palomar, will be supplemented by readings from his critical prose, collected in the volumes The Uses of Literature and Six Memos for the Next Millennium. Taught in English.
Instructor: 
Robert Pogue Harrison
Instructor: 
David Lummus
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
W 2:15 PM - 5:05 PM

Novels into Film

Subject Code: 
ITALIAN
Course Number: 
281
Description: 

 

Some critics claim that film has displaced the novel as the most popular narrative form of contemporary culture. What is the relationship between the two media? Which novels are chosen for adaptation and why? What are the relative strengths and limitations of literature and film as media? What are the specific pleasures of adaptations? In this course we will read five Italian novels and analyze their film versions, viewing adaptation as a legitimate creative response to a work of literature. We will first read the novel and consider the particular challenges it presents to transposition into film. We will follow this discussion with a close reading of the film version. The goal of the course is to examine cinematic adaptation as a cultural process by introducing a group of significant texts from the Italian tradition. Taught in English.
Instructor: 
Carolyn Springer
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
4-5
Day/Time: 
T 1:15 PM - 4:05 PM

Italy: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Subject Code: 
ITALIAN
Course Number: 
101
Description: 

 

Renowned for its rich cultural tradition, Italy is also one of the most problematic nations in Europe. This course explores the contradictions at the heart of Italy, focusing on five key words and their corresponding human figures, which embody the spirit of Italy and its people: Stile (the artist), Spirito (the hero-saint), Scienza (the thinker), Migrazione (the explorer), and Crisi (the political man). Through the study of historical and literary texts, films, and news media, the course addresses figures such as Dante, Michelangelo, Da Vinci, and Galileo; and socio-cultural phenomena such as fashion and design, the scientific revolution, immigration, and Berlusconi. Offered as a part of the Gateways to the World program. Taught in English.
Instructor: 
David Lummus
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
TTh 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Getting Through Proust

Subject Code: 
FRENCH
Course Number: 
228E
Description: 

 

Selections from In Search of Lost Time. Themes: habit, heredity, constitution of the self; language, names, metaphor, and metonymy; aesthetics, music, photography, and painting; truth, lies, belief, and disenchantment; sleep, dreams, memory, time, modernity, and technology; friendship, love, homosexuality, jealousy, and mediated desire. Taught in English; readings in French or English.
Instructor: 
Joshua Landy
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
Th 6:15 PM - 9:05 PM

Dante's Inferno

Subject Code: 
ITALIAN
Course Number: 
235E
Description: 

 

Intensive reading of Dante's Inferno (the first canticle of his three canticle poem The Divine Comedy). Main objective: to learn how to read the Inferno in detail and in depth, which entails both close textual analysis as well as a systematic reconstruction of the Christian doctrines that subtend the poem. The other main objective is to understand how Dante's civic and political identity as a Florentine, and especially his exile from Florence, determined his literary career and turned him into the author of the poem. Special emphasis on Dante's moral world view and his representation of character. Taught in English.
Instructor: 
Robert Pogue Harrison
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
M 2:15 PM - 5:05 PM

The Problem of Evil in Literature, Film, and Philosophy

Subject Code: 
FRENCH
Course Number: 
265
Crosslisted as: 
POLISCI 338E
Description: 

 

Conceptions of evil and its nature and source, distinctions between natural and moral evil, and what belongs to God versus to the human race have undergone transformations reflected in literature and film. Sources include Rousseau's response to the 1755 Lisbon earthquake; Hannah Arendt's interpretation of Auschwitz; Günther Anders' reading of Hiroshima; and current reflections on looming climatic and nuclear disasters. Readings from Rousseau, Kant, Dostoevsky, Arendt, Anders, Jonas, Camus, Ricoeur, Houellebeck, Girard. Films by Lang, Bergman, Losey, Hitchcock.
Instructor: 
Jean-Pierre Dupuy
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
T 2:15 PM - 5:05 PM

North/South in Contemporary Italy

Subject Code: 
ITALIAN
Course Number: 
256
Description: 

 

One of the most difficult tasks of Italian unification was to negotiate the many differences between North and South -- economic, social, cultural, and linguistic. The phenomenal growth of regional and even separatist sentiment exemplified in the Northern League shows that Italian integration is far from complete. In this course we will explore the history of conflict between North and South from the Risorgimento to the present day, with a primary focus on prose fiction and film. Taught in English.
Instructor: 
Carolyn Springer
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
4
Day/Time: 
T 12:15 PM - 3:05 PM

Masterpieces of Hebrew Literature from the Bible to the Present

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
283
Description: 
This course presents and reflects on some of the canonical works of Hebrew literature, from biblical era to the present. Discussing works such as the Wisdom Books and selections from the Midrash; and reflecting on important periods such as the Golden Age of Jewish Culture in Spain, the Renaissance, and contemporary Israeli literature, we will highlight linguistic innovation, as well as crucial thematic and philosophical concerns. Readings include the Book of Job, Psalm, Ibn Gabirol, Mapu, Rachel, Goldbegr, Agnon, S. Yizhar, Amichai, Oz and more.
Instructor: 
Amir Eshel
Instructor: 
Vered Karti Shemtov
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
4-5
Day/Time: 
M 1:15 PM - 4:05 PM

American Poetry and Secular Prayer

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
162
Description: 

 

This course will explore the practice of "secular prayer" in early- and mid-20th Century North American poetry. We will look at diverse poetic examples of meditation, contemplation, exegesis and revelation in order to consider how and why poetry has maintained a particular relation to the sacred, even amidst a secular cultural and intellectual context. We'll also consider how this question has played out in several key strands of 20th century literary theory, with particular emphasis on New Criticism and Eco-Criticism. Primary readings will include the poetry of T.S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, Audre Lorde, George Oppen, Robert Bly, Mary Oliver, Charles Wright and Jan Zwicky.
Instructor: 
Lucy Maddux Alford
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
TTh 12:35 PM - 2:05 PM
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