poetry and poetics

Bronwen Tate

portrait: Bronwen Tate
Contact: 
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

Bronwen Tate is a PhD candidate in Comparative Literature at Stanford University. Her dissertation "Putting it All in, Leaving it All Out: Questions of Scale in Post-1945 American Poetry" uses scale as a lens to reevaluate 20th century poetic theories and practices. At a theoretical level, this project contrasts the opposing compositional impulses and reading experiences of a poetry of essence and a poetry of duration.  Her work brings into dialogue writers as aesthetically divergent as Allen Ginsberg and Lorine Niedecker or Frank Stanford and James Merrill, as well as shedding new light on the feminist book-length poems of Lyn Hejinian and Bernadette Mayer and the gesture of poetic reticence in Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Creeley. Bronwen has taught courses in literature, creative writing, and English composition at Stanford University, Brown University, Borough of Manhattan Community College and other institutions. She is a 2011-2013 DARE (Diversifying Academia, Recruiting Excellence) Fellow. 

Education: 

2013 Ph.D. in Comparative Literature, Stanford University  (Expected) 

2006: M.F.A. in Literary Arts: Poetry, Brown University, Providence, RI

2003: B.A. with Honors in Comparative Literature: Literary Translation, Brown University, Providence, RI, magna cum laude. Senior Honors Thesis: Translation into English of the Italian novel Montedidio with critical introduction.

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Italian

Virginia Ramos

portrait: Virginia Ramos
Contact: 
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

Virginia Ramos is a poet and doctoral student in the Comparative Literature department at Stanford University, California, US. She was born in Madrid, Spain, and currently resides in the United States, where she attended college at San Francisco State University and graduated with a B.A. in French and a M.A. in interdisciplinary Humanities with a focus in World Literature. She is currently working on a dissertation on the relationship between space and narrative in 20th and 21st century with a particular emphasis on modernist and contemporary texts. Her interests center on 20th century poetics, poetry, lyrical novel, and multi-genre texts.She works in Spanish, English, French and German Literatures, primarily. She is interested in poetics of liminality and comparative readings that allow for the 'multiplication' of language, the question of “form as content”, “space as content” and the relationship with historical and societal swifts through the creation of novel narrative and poetry with an attention to physical space, often urban. Her work aims to contrast and theorize current and future trends of transnational thought globally. 

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Italian
Language(s): 
Spanish

Noam Pines

portrait:
Contact: 

noampi@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

I work on modernist poetry in Hebrew, German, Yiddish, and English. My interests include: multivalency of poetic language, politics of national identity.

Conference Presentations:

"The Nomos and The Jewish Question", ACLA, New Orleans, April 1-4, 2010

"The Dromoscopic Aesthetics of Futurism",The Poetics of Pain: Aesthetics, Ideology and Representation, CUNY, February 25th-26th, 2010

Education: 

B.A  - History and Philosophy, Tel Aviv University
M.A. - Literature, Tel Aviv University, summa cum laude

Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Hebrew
Language(s): 
Yiddish

Christopher Donaldson

portrait: Christopher Donaldson
Contact: 

c.donaldson@lancaster.ac.uk

Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

Now Literary Research Associate, Spatial Humanities Project, Lancaster University.

 

RESEARCH & TEACHING INTERESTS

Eighteenth- & Nineteenth-Century British Literature and Culture, esp. Romantic Poetry, Fiction, and Drama; History of the Book, esp. 1700-1900; Literature and Place; Literary History & Philology; Classical Literature, esp. Greek Tragedy



DISSERTATION

The Local Poet in the Romantic Tradition (Completed, Aug. 2012)

Many poems evoke a sense of place; few poems, however, forge a lasting connection between a poet and a particular locale. In The Local Poet in the Romantic Tradition, I chart the evolution of this latter type of poetry and document its influence on readerly tastes in Britain over the last two hundred and fifty years. Parting ways with previous studies, I take the view that local poetry is defined less by its invocation of specifically named locations, or even by a proclivity for amassing topographical detail, than by the cultivation of a special kind of poetic ethos. Drawing on the works of William Wordsworth as well as a range of pre- and post-Romantic poets, I examine different instantiations of this ethos and outline the contours of the tradition of local poetry in Britain from its origins in the eighteenth century to its rise to prominence in the Victorian era. 

Committee: Roland Greene (advisor), Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, Blakey Vermeule 



PUBLICATIONS

Articles

“Evoking the Local: Wordsworth, Martineau, and Early Victorian Fiction," Review of English Studies (forthcoming 2013).

"Another Smart Letter," Notes and Queries, lix (2012)
, 338-40.

“A Missing Smart Letter Located,” Notes and Queries, lviii (2011), 504-5

“Wordsworth’s ‘To the Rev. Dr. W__.’,” Notes and Queries, lviii (2011), 542-6.




Encyclopedia Entries

“Discordia Concors,” “Expression,” and “Spontaneity,” The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics

4th edition, eds. Roland Greene and Stephen Cushman (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012)

“The Sonnet” and “Thomas Warton,” The Blackwell Encyclopaedia of British Literature, 1660-1789,
eds. Gary Day and Jack Lynch (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, forthcoming June 2013).
 

Reviews

"Idleness, Contemplation and the Aesthetic, 1750-1830, by Richard Adelman," Notes and Queries, 60 (2013) doi: 10.1093/notesj/gjs212.

"Literature 1780-1830: Romantic Poetry," The Year’s Work in English Studies 92 (forthcoming 2013).



TEACHING EXPERIENCE

INSTRUCTOR

DEPT OF COMP LIT, STANFORD UNIV, WINTER, 2011 
COURSE TITLE: On the Road: 20th-Century Travel Literature (COMPLIT 139)

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM FOR GIFTED YOUTH (EPGY), S & S INSTITUTE, KR, SUMMER, 2010 
COURSE TITLE: Elements of Analysis, Elements of Style (STANFORD, EPGY)

PROGRAM IN WRITING & RHETORIC (PWR), STANFORD UNIV, WINTER & SPRING, 2008
COURSE TITLE: Rhetorical Conversations in Poetry & the Visual Arts (PWR 1-31/37)

TEACHING ASSITANT

DEPTS OF COMP LIT AND FRENCH & ITALIAN, STANFORD UNIV, WINTER, 2009
COURSE TITLE: Literature as Performance (COMPLIT 122 & FRENGEN 122)
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht

TEACHING ASSITANT, DEPTS OF COMP LIT AND ENGLISH, STANFORD UNIV,  AUTUMN, 2008
COURSE TITLE: Poetry, Poems, Worlds (COMPLIT 121 & ENGLISH 110/010)
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Roland Greene

TEACHING ASSITANT, DEPT OF ENGLISH, STANFORD UNIV, SPRING, 2007 
COURSE TITLE: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Donne, and their Contemporaries (ENGLISH 109 & 09)
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Martin Evans

TEACHING ASSITANT, DEPARTMENT OF COMP LIT, PENN STATE UNIV, SPRING, 2001
COURSE TITLE: Arthurian Legends (COMPLIT 107)
INSTRUCTOR: Adam Miyashiro

David Marno

Contact: 

marno@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Renaissances
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

Laura Wittman

portrait: Laura Wittman
Contact: 

101 Pigott Hall
650 725 5243
lwittman@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Spring 2013: Wednesdays, 1-3, or by appointment.
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature

Laura Wittman primarily works on 19th- and 20th-century Italian and French literature from a comparative perspective. She is interested in connections between modernity, religion, and politics. Much of her work explores the role of the ineffable, the mystical, and the body in modern poetry, philosophy, and culture.

Her book, The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Modern Mourning, and the Reinvention of the Mystical Body (University of Toronto Press, 2011) has just been awarded the Marraro Award of the Society for Italian Historical Studies for 2012. It explores the creation and reception of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier – an Italian, French, and British invention at the end of the First World War – as an emblem for modern mourning, from a cultural, historical, and literary perspective. It draws on literary and filmic evocations of the Unknown Soldier, as well as archival materials, to show that Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is not pro-war, nationalist, or even proto-Fascist. Rather, it is a monument that heals trauma in two ways: first, it refuses facile consolations, and forcefully dramatizes the fact that suffering cannot be spiritualized or justified by any ideology; second, it rejects despair by enacting, through the concreteness of a particular body, a human solidarity in suffering that commands respect. Anticipating recent analyses of PTSD, the Memorial shows that when traumatic events are relived in a ritual, embodied, empathetic setting, healing occurs not via analysis but via symbolic communication and transmission of emotion.

Laura Wittman is the editor of a special issue of the Romanic Review entitled Italy and France: Imagined Geographies (2006), as well as the co-editor of an anthology of Futurist manifestos and literary works, Futurism: An Anthology (Yale University Press, 2009). She has published articles on d’Annunzio, Marinetti, Fogazzaro, Ungaretti, Montale, and Sereni, as well as on decadent-era culture and Italian cinema.

She received her Ph.D. in 2001 from Yale University where she wrote a dissertation entitled "Mystics Without God: Spirituality and Form in Italian and French Modernism," an analysis of the historical and intellectual context for the self-descriptive use of the term "mystic without God" in the works of Gabriele d'Annununzio and Paul Valéry.

In Spring 2009, she was organizer of the California Interdisciplinary Consortium for Italian Studies (CICIS) Annual Conference, held at the Stanford Humanities Center. She was also organizer of the interdisciplinary conference on Language, Literature, and Mysticism held at the Stanford Humanities Center on 15 and 16 October 2010.

She is currently working on a new book entitled Lazarus' Silence: Near-Death Experiences in Fiction, Science, and Popular Culture. It is the first cultural history of near-death experiences in the twentieth-century West, and it puts literary rewritings of the Biblical Lazarus story – by major authors such as Leonid Andreyev, Miguel de Unamuno, D. H. Lawrence, Luigi Pirandello, Graham Greene, Georges Bataille, André Malraux, and Péter Nádas – in the double context of popular versions of coming back to life in testimonies, fiction, and film, and of evolving medical and neuroscientific investigation. Its central questions are: how near-death stories shape our understanding of consciousness; and how they affect our care for the dying.

Education: 

2001: PhD, Department of Italian Language and Literature, Yale University
1991: BA, Yale University, Summa cum Laude, double major in French (with Distinction) and Italian (with Exceptional Distinction)
1986: French Baccalaureate, Lycée Français de Washington (Washington, D. C.), with honors

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Italian

Marisa Galvez

portrait: Marisa Galvez
Contact: 

134 Pigott Hall
650 723 1918
mgalvez@stanford.edu

Office Hours: By appointment

Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

 

Marisa Galvez specializes in the literature of the Middle Ages in France and Western Europe, especially the poetry and narrative literature written in Occitan and Old French.  Her areas of interest include the troubadours, vernacular poetics, the intersection of performance and literary cultures, and the critical history of medieval studies as a discipline. At Stanford, she currently teaches courses on medieval and Renaissance French literature and love lyric, as well as interdisciplinary upper level courses on the medieval imaginary in modern literature, film, and art.

Her recent book, Songbook: How Lyrics Became Poetry in Medieval Europe (University of Chicago Press, 2012), treats what poetry was before the emergence of the modern category, “poetry”: that is, how vernacular songbooks of the thirteenth to fifteenth centuries shaped our modern understanding of poetry by establishing expectations of what is a poem, what is a poet, and what is lyric poetry itself.  The first comparative study of songbooks, the book concerns three vernacular traditions—Occitan, Middle High German, and Castilian—and analyzes how the songbook emerged from its original performance context of oral publication, into a medium for preservation, and finally became a literary object that performs the interests of poets and readers.  Her current research project, tentatively entitled "The Subject of Crusade: Penitential Poetics in Vernacular Lyric and Romance" examines how the crusader subject of vernacular literature sought to reconcile secular ideals about love and chivalry with crusade.  This study places this literature in dialogue with new ideas about penance and confession that emerged from the second half of the twelfth century to the end of the thirteenth.

Forthcoming publications include "The Voice of the Unrepentant Crusader: 'Aler m'estuet' by the Châtelain d'Arras" (Voice and Voicelessness in Medieval Europe, ed. Irit Kleinman, Palgrave) that analyzes how a crusaders poet's unrepentant voice can be viewed as in tension with the confessional voice of pastoral literature, and "The Intersubjective Performance of Confession vs. Courtly Profession" (Performance and Theatricality in the MIddle Ages and Renaissance, ed. Markus Cruse, ACMRS) that compares penitential performativity and witnessing in courtly lyric and moral tales.  

Her multi-year Performing Trobar project seeks to cultivate, historicize, and compare the experience of troubadour lyrics in literary and performative modes. In exposing students and the Stanford community to the rich aural and verbal texture of the medieval world, Performing Trobar seeks to animate our engagement with medieval lyric both as a philological artifact and as a vernacular art that continues to be translated before various audiences around the world. She also currently serves on the Executive Committee for the Discussion Group on Provençal Language and Literature of the Modern Language Association and acts as Faculty Coordinator of the Theoretical Perspectives of the Middle Ages workshop at the Stanford Humanities Center. 

Troubadours Art Ensemble: Stanford Visit from SiCa on Vimeo.

Education: 

2007 Ph.D in Comparative Literature, Stanford University
1999 B.A. in French, Yale University

Language(s): 
French

Monika Greenleaf

portrait:
Contact: 

Building 240, Room 105
Phone: 650 725 5933
monika.greenleaf@gmail.com

Office Hours: 
Thursday 2:30-4:30
Focal Group(s): 
Performance
Education: 

Ph.D., Yale University

M.A., Yale University

B.A., M.A., Oxford University

B.A., Stanford University

Language(s): 
Russian

Amir Eshel

portrait: Sylke Tempel
Contact: 
Pigott Hall 219
Phone: 650 723 0413
Fax: 650 725 8421
eshel@stanford.edu
Curriculum Vitae: 

Amir Eshel is Edward Clark Crossett Professor of Humanistic Studies, Professor of German Studies and Comparative Literature; an Affiliated Faculty at The Europe Center and CISAC at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. His research focuses on the contemporary novel in a global dimension, twentieth century German culture, German-Jewish history and culture, and modern Hebrew literature. He is interested in the literary and cultural imagination as it addresses modernity’s traumatic past for its contemporary philosophical, political and ethical implications.

Recently, Amir Eshel completed a new book, Futurity: Contemporary Literature and the Quest for the Past (The University of Chicago Press in 2013). The German version of the book, Zukünftigkeit: Die zeitgenössische Literatur und die Vergangenheit appeared in 2012 with Suhrkamp Verlag. Together with Yfaat Weiss he co-edited a book of essays on Barbara Honigmann, Kurz hinter der Wahrheit und dicht neben der Lüge: Zum Werk Barbara Honigmanns (Fink Verlag (2013)). He is also the author of Zeit der Zäsur: Jüdische Lyriker im Angesicht der Shoah (1999), and Das Ungesagte Schreiben: Israelische Prosa und das Problem der Palästinensischen Flucht und Vertreibung (2006). In recent years, he also published essays on writers such as Franz Kafka, Hannah Arendt, Paul Celan, W.G. Sebald, Günter Grass, Alexander Kluge, Durs Grünbein, Barbara Honigmann, Dan Pagis, S. Yizhar, and Yoram Kaniyuk.

Before joining the Stanford faculty in 1998 as an Assistant Professor of German Studies, he taught at the University of Hamburg, Germany. Amir Eshel is a recipient of fellowships from the Alexander von Humboldt and the Friedrich Ebert foundations and received the Award for Distinguished Teaching from the School of Humanities and Sciences. He received an M.A. and Ph.D. in German literature, both from the University of Hamburg.

Education: 

1998 Ph.D. University of Hamburg, Germany
1994 M.A. University of Hamburg, Germany

Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Hebrew

Roland Greene

portrait: Roland Greene
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 215
Phone: 650 725 1214
rgreene@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
On leave 2013-14
Focal Group(s): 
Renaissances
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics
Roland Greene is a scholar of Renaissance culture, especially the literatures of England, Latin Europe, and the transatlantic world, and of poetry and poetics from the sixteenth century to the present. His most recent book is Five Words: Critical Semantics in the Age of Shakespeare and Cervantes (Chicago, 2013). He is the editor in chief of the fourth edition of the Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (2012).
 
His other books include Unrequited Conquests: Love and Empire in the Colonial Americas (Chicago, 1999), which argues that the love poetry of the Renaissance had a formative role in European ideas about the Americas during the first phase of the colonial period; Post-Petrarchism: Origins and Innovations of the Western Lyric Sequence (Princeton, 1991), a transhistorical study of lyric poetics; and, edited with Elizabeth Fowler, The Project of Prose in Early Modern Europe and the New World (Cambridge, 1997).
 
Greene is the general editor of a series of critical volumes titled World Literatures Reimagined. The first three volumes in the series, Earl Fitz's Brazilian Narrative Traditions in a Comparative Context, Azade Seyhan's Tales of Crossed Destinies: The Modern Turkish Novel in a Comparative Context, and Kirsty Hooper and Manuel Puga Moruxa's Contemporary Galician Studies, are in print.
 
The directions of Greene's research are reflected in the three working groups he oversees with colleagues and graduate students, two of which are formal Focal Groups in the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages. In 2004 he established Renaissances: A Research Group in Early Modern Literatures, which presents younger scholars from around the U.S. and elsewhere working on topics of long-term significance (for 2012-14, the topic is "Nodes, Networks, Names"). In 2006 he created the Stanford Poetics Workshop, which includes a regular membership of faculty members, advanced graduate students, and fellows at the Humanities Center. A group on Transamerican Studies, co-chaired with Ramón Saldívar, began meeting in the autumn of 2009 and is currently on hiatus. These groups invite both Stanford scholars and visitors to present research in progress, and serve to assemble the community of Ph.D. students currently working in these areas.
 
Greene is the Director of Arcade, a digital salon for literature and the humanities.
 
At Stanford he is actively involved with the Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in the Humanities, which brings postdoctoral scholars to campus, with the Bing Overseas Studies Program, and with the Program in Structured Liberal Education (SLE), of which he is a former director.
 
Greene is currently Second Vice President of the Modern Language Association of America; he will serve as President in 2015.
Education: 

1985: Ph.D., Princeton University

1979: A.B., Brown University

Events: 

Future Lectures and Conference Papers:

"The Semantics of the Baroque: How Seventeenth-Century Poets and Artists Understood (and Translated) the Terms for a Baroque Aesthetic," Jackman Humanities Institute, University of Toronto, November 19, 2013

"Cervantes in Shakespeare in Theobald: Three Stages of Literary History in One Artifact," Double Falshood (1727) and Cardenio (1613): Theobald, Fletcher, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Center for Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Studies and William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, University of California, Los Angeles, January 2014

"Institutions and the Vernacular," Renaissance Society of America, New York, March 2014

Roundtable, Sidney and Spenser Studies in Tribute to T. P. Roche, Renaissance Society of America, New York, March 2014

Roundtable, Transgressing Boundaries: Comparative Epic and Drama, Renaissance Society of America, New York, March 2014

"Auerbach's Universals," Reading Mimesis Chapter 13, Shakespeare Association of America, St. Louis, April 2014

Advisees: 

Ph.D. students:

Rhiannon Lewis, ""One Word My Whole Years Work": Time, Use, and Labor in Renaissance Poetry," Department of English, in progress

Ryan Haas, "The Draggled Muse: Early Modern Literature and the Poetics of Triviality," Department of English, in progress

Lucy Alford, "Unfolding Presence: Poetic Attention through the Lens of the Twentieth Century," Department of Comparative Literature, in progress

Talya Meyers, "'Streight Course' and 'Wandring Eye': Reconsidering the Epic," Department of English, in progress

Noam Pines, "The Poetics of Dehumanization in Jewish Literature," Department of Comparative Literature, in progress

Virginia Ramos, "The Modern Lyrical Novel," Department of Comparative Literature, in progress

Bronwen Tate, "Putting it All In, Leaving it All Out: Expansion and Compression in Post-War Poetry," Department of Comparative Literature, in progress

Colin Moore, "Communicative Situations in Early Modern European Fiction," Department of Comparative Literature, in progress

Christopher Donaldson, "The Local Poet in the Romantic Tradition," Department of Comparative Literature, 2012. Now Literary Research Associate, Spatial Humanities Project, Lancaster University.

Kathryn Hume, "The Performance of Analysis in Seventeenth-Century Literature and Science," Department of Comparative Literature, 2012. Now Marketing Content Specialist, IntApp.

Anton Vander Zee, "'The Final Lilt of Songs': Late Whitman and the Long American Century," Department of English, 2012. Now Assistant Professor of English, College of Charleston.

Frederick L. Blumberg, "Literature and Its Rivals, 1500-1660," Department of Comparative Literature, 2011. Now Assistant Professor of English, University of Hong Kong.

Fabian Goppelsröder, "Kalendergeschichte and fait divers: The Poetics of Circumscribed Space," Department of Comparative Literature, 2011. Now Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Potsdam.

Harris Feinsod, "Fluent Mundo: Inter-American Poetry, 1939-1973," Department of Comparative Literature, 2011. Now Assistant Professor of English, Northwestern University.

Stephanie Schmidt, "Foundational Narratives, Performance and the City," Department of Iberian and Latin American Cultures, 2011. Now Assistant Professor of Spanish and Comparative Literature, University of Tulsa.

David Marno, "Thanking as Thinking: The Poetics of Grace in John Donne's Holy Sonnets," Department of Comparative Literature, 2011. Now Assistant Professor of English, University of California, Berkeley.

Anne Marie Guglielmo, "Contested Genealogies in Early Modern Mediterranean Literature," Department of Comparative Literature, 2010

Ema Vyroubalová, "Linguistic Alterity and Foreignness in Early Modern England, 1534-1625," Department of English, 2010. Recipient of the department's Alden Prize for best dissertation, 2011. Now Lecturer in Early Modern English Literature, Trinity College, Dublin.

Claire Seiler, “Between Pole and Tropic: Poetry and Fiction, 1945-1955," Department of English, 2010. Now Assistant Professor of English, Dickinson College.

Enrique Lima, "Forms of Conquest: Indian Conflict and the Novel in the Americas," Department of Comparative Literature, 2006. Now Assistant Professor of English, University of Oregon.

David Colón, "Embodying the Ideogram: Orientalism and the Visual Aesthetic in Modernist Poetry," Department of English, 2004. Now Assistant Professor of English, Texas Christian University.

Jillanne Michell, "The Ethics of Toleration in English Renaissance Literature," Department of English, University of Oregon, 2004. Now Professor of English and Department Chair, Umpqua Community College.

Carolyn Bergquist, "Worlds of Persuasion," Department of English, University of Oregon, 2003. Now Director of Composition, University of Oregon.

Kate Jenckes, "Allegories of Writing / History: Borges, Benjamin, and Buenos Aires," Program in Comparative Literature, University of Oregon, 2001. Now Associate Professor of Spanish, University of Michigan.

Miles Taylor, "Nation, History, and Theater: Representing the Past in the Drama of Early Modern England," Department of English, University of Oregon, 2000. Now Associate Professor of English, Le Moyne College.

Nina Chordas, "Utopian Poetics: The Praxis and Discourse of Utopia in England and America, 1516-1637," Department of English, University of Oregon, 1998. Now Associate Professor of English and Department Chair, University of Alaska Southeast.

Jaspal Singh, "Maddening Inscriptions: 'Madness' as Resistance in Postcolonial African and South Asian Women's Fiction and Film," Program in Comparative Literature, University of Oregon, 1998. Now Professor of English, Northern Michigan University.

Karen Piper, "Territories of the Novel: Borders, Identities, and Displacements in Twentieth-Century Fiction," Program in Comparative Literature, University of Oregon, 1996. Now Professor of English, University of Missouri, Columbia.

Marilyn G. Miller, "Miscegenation and the Narrative Voice," Program in Comparative Literature, University of Oregon, 1995. Now Associate Professor of Spanish, Tulane University.

Professional Activities: 

        
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