The novel

Margaret Cohen

portrait: DLCL Admin
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 211
Phone: 650 724 0106
macohen@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Tu 3:00-4:00

 

Please email comparativelit@stanford.edu to schedule a meeting with Professor Cohen or ask questions regarding the undergraduate major/minor.

Margaret Cohen’s most recent book is The Novel and the Sea (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010), which was awarded the Louis R. Gottschalk Prize from the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and the George and Barbara Perkins Prize from the International Society for the Study of the Narrative. She is also the author of Profane Illumination: Walter Benjamin and the Paris of Surrealist Revolution (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993) and The Sentimental Education of the Novel (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999), which received the Modern Language Association's Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione prize in French and Francophone literature. In addition, Margaret Cohen coedited two collections of scholarship on the European novel: The Literary Channel: The Inter-National Invention of the Novel with Carolyn Dever (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002), andSpectacles of Realism: Body, Gender, Genre with Christopher Prendergast (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1995). She edited and translated Sophie Cottin's best-selling novel of 1799, Claire d'Albe (New York: Modern Language Association, 2003), and has edited a new critical edition of Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary that appeared with W.W. Norton in 2004.

Education: 

1988: Ph.D., Yale University
1982: M.A., New York University

1980-81: Universität Konstanz
1980: B.A., Yale University

Language(s): 
French

Burcu Karahan Richardson

portrait: Burcu Richardson
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 232
Phone: 650 723 6608
bkarahan@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment

Burcu Karahan's research focuses on the issues of translation, gender, narcissism, and Westernization in the case of 19th century Ottoman literature. Her teaching  interests include Ottoman and modern Turkish literatures; translations in late 19th century Turkish Literature; contemporary Turkish Cinema; 18th and 19thcentury British and French Novels; decadence, and the novel.

Education: 
  • MA Department of Turkish Literature, Bilkent University.
  • Ph.D. Department of Comparative Literature, Indiana University. 
Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Turkish
Language(s): 
Ottoman Turkish

Bronwen Tate

portrait: Bronwen Tate
Contact: 
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

Bronwen Tate is a PhD candidate in Comparative Literature at Stanford University. Her dissertation "Putting it All in, Leaving it All Out: Questions of Scale in Post-1945 American Poetry" uses scale as a lens to reevaluate 20th century poetic theories and practices. At a theoretical level, this project contrasts the opposing compositional impulses and reading experiences of a poetry of essence and a poetry of duration.  Her work brings into dialogue writers as aesthetically divergent as Allen Ginsberg and Lorine Niedecker or Frank Stanford and James Merrill, as well as shedding new light on the feminist book-length poems of Lyn Hejinian and Bernadette Mayer and the gesture of poetic reticence in Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Creeley. Bronwen has taught courses in literature, creative writing, and English composition at Stanford University, Brown University, Borough of Manhattan Community College and other institutions. She is a 2011-2013 DARE (Diversifying Academia, Recruiting Excellence) Fellow. 

Education: 

2013 Ph.D. in Comparative Literature, Stanford University  (Expected) 

2006: M.F.A. in Literary Arts: Poetry, Brown University, Providence, RI

2003: B.A. with Honors in Comparative Literature: Literary Translation, Brown University, Providence, RI, magna cum laude. Senior Honors Thesis: Translation into English of the Italian novel Montedidio with critical introduction.

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Italian

Michael Leigh Hoyer

portrait: Isaac Bleaman
Contact: 

mhoyer@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature

Jessie Byron Ferguson

portrait: Jessie Ferguson
Contact: 

jbfergus@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature

I began my doctoral studies at Stanford in 2007.  Before that, I studied Central European literature and culture as an undergraduate at the University of Chicago, where I was also an enthusiastic member of the Women in Philosophy group.  I then received my M.A. from San Francisco State University with a thesis on history and autofiction in three novels of the mid-1990s. 

My dissertation focuses on the 20th century "essayistic" novel in Latin America (Cuba) and in Europe (Austria), in the context of distinct national/cultural traditions of philosophy and essayistic writing.  I am particularly interested in one shared aspect of these works: the evolving tensions between authorship and fictional creation in the 20th century.  Although my focus is on the era from roughly 1910 to 1965, this tension becomes increasingly salient as the century concludes; I argue that by studying earlier experiments in essayism, we can construct a crucial prehistory of autofiction and related postmodern subgenres on both continents. This is not a triumphalist history of radical uncertainty prevailing over dogmatic realism; it is equally the story of a counter-movement away from creativity and towards a more defensive posture, i.e. an attempt to assess the costs as well as the benefits of essayistic style without simply recapitulating Lukács (although you may draw the glasses and mustache on my portrait above, if you must).

I am also interested in the essay as form in world literature; in the construction and extension of "nonfiction" as a literary category; and, much more broadly, in the figure and theme of education within modern literature: as an imperative, as a curse, as a utopia, as a forest not seen for the trees.

Education: 

2007: M.A. Comparative and World Literature, San Francisco State University. Additional coursework at the University of California-Berkeley and Freie Universität Berlin (2006).  Thesis: "The Archimedean Author: W.G. Sebald, Roberto Bolaño, and Narrative After Borges."

2002: B.A. General Studies in the Humanities, University of Chicago.  Emphasis on East-Central European literature and culture.

Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Spanish

Marc Bertrand

portrait:
Contact: 

bertrand@stanford.edu

 Professor Marc Bertrand was raised in France and obtained his Ph.D. in Romance Languages at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of L'Oeuvre de Jean Prevost and editor, contributor, and co-author of a number of other publications concerning French and cultural history. He is working on Le Roman du bâtard, a book on the contemporary French novel. A recent essay in French Cultural Studies, "L'Ecrit et l'image populaires dans les études d'histoire culturelle," advocated the inclusion of new material from popular culture in the teaching of French cultural history. Professor Bertrand loves Paris past and present, and he has participated in the Stanford in Paris program, lecturing on contemporary French society and culture.

Language(s): 
French

Monika Greenleaf

portrait:
Contact: 

Building 240, Room 105
Phone: 650 725 5933
monika.greenleaf@gmail.com

Office Hours: 
Thursday 2:30-4:30
Focal Group(s): 
Performance
Education: 

Ph.D., Yale University

M.A., Yale University

B.A., M.A., Oxford University

B.A., Stanford University

Language(s): 
Russian

Margaret Cohen

portrait: Beverly Allen
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 211
Phone: 650 724 0106
macohen@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Tues 3:00-4:00 (sign-up sheet at room 260-211) or by appointment

Please email comparativelit@stanford.edu to schedule a meeting with Professor Cohen or ask questions regarding the undergraduate major/minor.

Margaret Cohen’s most recent book is The Novel and the Sea (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010), which was awarded the Louis R. Gottschalk Prize from the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies and the George and Barbara Perkins Prize from the International Society for the Study of the Narrative. She is also the author of Profane Illumination: Walter Benjamin and the Paris of Surrealist Revolution (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993) and The Sentimental Education of the Novel (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999), which received the Modern Language Association's Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione prize in French and Francophone literature. In addition, Margaret Cohen coedited two collections of scholarship on the European novel: The Literary Channel: The Inter-National Invention of the Novel with Carolyn Dever (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002), andSpectacles of Realism: Body, Gender, Genre with Christopher Prendergast (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1995). She edited and translated Sophie Cottin's best-selling novel of 1799, Claire d'Albe (New York: Modern Language Association, 2003), and has edited a new critical edition of Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary that appeared with W.W. Norton in 2004.

Education: 

1988: Ph.D., Yale University
1982: M.A., New York University

1980-81: Universität Konstanz
1980: B.A., Yale University

Language(s): 
French
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