19th century

Sarah Wilson

portrait: Sarah Wilson
Contact: 

swilson8@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Performance
Education: 

Dartmouth College Bachelors in Russian and Government cum laude, 2008. Honors Thesis: Victor Pelevin's Feminist Polemic. Awards: ORL Senior Scholar, Cloise Appleton Crane Prize, Pray Modern Language Prize in Russian

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Russian
Language(s): 
Ukrainian

Burcu Karahan Richardson

portrait: Burcu Richardson
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 232
Phone: 650 723 6608
bkarahan@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment

Burcu Karahan's research focuses on the issues of translation, gender, narcissism, and Westernization in the case of 19th century Ottoman literature. Her teaching  interests include Ottoman and modern Turkish literatures; translations in late 19th century Turkish Literature; contemporary Turkish Cinema; 18th and 19thcentury British and French Novels; decadence, and the novel.

Education: 
  • MA Department of Turkish Literature, Bilkent University.
  • Ph.D. Department of Comparative Literature, Indiana University. 
Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
Turkish
Language(s): 
Ottoman Turkish

Bronwen Tate

portrait: Bronwen Tate
Contact: 
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

Bronwen Tate is a PhD candidate in Comparative Literature at Stanford University. Her dissertation "Putting it All in, Leaving it All Out: Questions of Scale in Post-1945 American Poetry" uses scale as a lens to reevaluate 20th century poetic theories and practices. At a theoretical level, this project contrasts the opposing compositional impulses and reading experiences of a poetry of essence and a poetry of duration.  Her work brings into dialogue writers as aesthetically divergent as Allen Ginsberg and Lorine Niedecker or Frank Stanford and James Merrill, as well as shedding new light on the feminist book-length poems of Lyn Hejinian and Bernadette Mayer and the gesture of poetic reticence in Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Creeley. Bronwen has taught courses in literature, creative writing, and English composition at Stanford University, Brown University, Borough of Manhattan Community College and other institutions. She is a 2011-2013 DARE (Diversifying Academia, Recruiting Excellence) Fellow. 

Education: 

2013 Ph.D. in Comparative Literature, Stanford University  (Expected) 

2006: M.F.A. in Literary Arts: Poetry, Brown University, Providence, RI

2003: B.A. with Honors in Comparative Literature: Literary Translation, Brown University, Providence, RI, magna cum laude. Senior Honors Thesis: Translation into English of the Italian novel Montedidio with critical introduction.

Language(s): 
French
Language(s): 
German
Language(s): 
Italian

Darci Gardner

portrait: Darci Gardner
Contact: 

darcig@stanford.edu

Building 240 Room 204

Office Hours: 
Tuesday 2:15-5:15 and by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature

Darci graduated from Stanford in June of 2013 with a Ph.D. in French and a minor in Italian. She specializes in French language and literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Her dissertation, entitled "Rereading as Requirement: The Cognitive Demands of Mallarmé, Krysinska, and Proust," argues that certain fin-de-siècle writers designed their texts to restructure the interpretive habits of their readers.

Prior to attending Stanford, Darci discovered her passion for French Studies as an undergraduate at Vanderbilt University, where she enjoyed spending long afternoons perusing the collections of the W. T. Bandy Center. She earned her B.A. in Comparative Literature and wrote a thesis on "Painterly Techniques in Le Spleen de Paris."

Her ongoing research focuses on visual culture, film, and cognitive approaches to literature. These interdisciplinary interests are visible in her teaching through the variety of media that she integrates into classroom discussions.


Publications

"Pourquoi privilégier la poésie? La réponse des 'récits' de Bonnefoy," Romance Notes 53.1 (2013): 11-20.

http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/romance_notes/v053/53.1.gardner.html


Courses

Fashion and Image in Post-Romantic Paris. Winter 2011. This course examines the role of fashion in the literature and visual culture of post-Romantic Paris. Classes will engage a variety of topics ranging from the formation of aesthetic values to the impact of the media on popular taste, while discussions will interrogate themes of gender, urbanization, and the rise of consumer culture. In addition to discussing texts, we will analyze depictions of fashion in visual genres such as caricature, cosmopolitan portraiture, advertising, and film. Readings include Gautier, Baudelaire, Maupassant, La Dame aux camélias, Madame Bovary, Carmen, Cyrano de Bergerac, and Salomé, among others.   Taught in French. Prerequisite: French Lit 130 or consent.  

Advanced French Grammar. Winter 2013. This course cultivates advanced proficiency in French with special attention to writing. Students will fine-tune their grammar skills and develop the ability to do both professional and academic work in the target language. We will examine feature articles, editorials, humoristic essays, nonfiction, and literature for samples of grammatical structures, idiomatic expressions, and communicative strategies. Writing assignments will be brief but frequent; they will gradually increase in length over the course of the term as our focus shifts from accuracy to effectiveness. Prerequisite: French 23C or equivalent.

 


Education: 
  • Ph.D. in French, minor in Italian. Stanford University, 2013.
  • B.A., summa cum laude, with high honors in Comparative Literature. Vanderbilt University, 2007.
  • Ravenscroft School. Raleigh, North Carolina, 2004.
Language(s): 
French

Harris Feinsod

portrait: DLCL Admin
Contact: 

Office 130
Stanford Humanities Center
424 Santa Teresa St
Stanford, CA 94305

hfeinsod@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
By Appointment (Stanford Humanities Center, 130)
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

I entered Stanford's Comparative Literature program in 2005, after completing an A.B. at Brown University, summa cum laude, double concentration in Comparative Literature and Italian Studies (2004).  I also studied at the Universitá di Bologna, dipartimento di Italianistica from 2002-2003. My research interests compass late 19th, 20th and 21st century U.S. and Latin American literature and culture; transnational literary studies (especially hemispheric American contexts); comparative poetics and the history of poetry in English, Spanish and Italian; modernism and the avant-garde in Europe and the Americas; approaches to the environmental humanities; postmodernism and inter-ethnic literature and cinema in the U.S. "new west."

I am presently completing my dissertation, "Fluent Mundo: Inter-American Poetry, 1939-1973," a study of poetry and the culture of inter-Americanism from the beginning of World War II to the peak of the Latin American literary "boom."

Publications:

Entries for “Sound Poetry,” “Glossolalia,” "Hypogram," "Clavis" and “Matrix,” Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics, 4th edn. (Princeton University Press, forthcoming, 2012).

Book review of Jeffrey Yang’s An Aquarium, Mantis 8 (Summer, 2009): 245-247.

“Reconsidering the ‘Spiritual Economy’: Saint-John Perse, His Translators, and the Limits of Internationalism,” Telos 137 (Spring, 2007): 139-161.

Recent Teaching

COMPLIT 134, "The Poetry of History in the Americas," Spring, 2010 (Instructor)

DLCL 189, "Honors Thesis Writing Workshop," Fall, 2008 and 2009 (TA)

ITALLANG 1 and 2, "First Year Italian," Winter-Spring, 2007 (Instructor)

COMPLIT 121, "Poems, Poetry, Worlds," Fall, 2007 (TA)

COMPLIT 123, "History of Childrens Literature," Spring, 2006 (TA)

Professional Activities:

Assistant Editor, The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics, 4th Edn (forthcoming, 2012)

Co-founder (with Roland Greene and Nicholas Jenkins) and coordinator, Stanford Workshop in Poetics, 2006-2010

Producer, Entitled Opinions, a weekly radio talk show and podcast hosted by Robert Harrison on KZSU 90.1FM, Stanford University, 2007-2009

Managing Editor, Mantis: A Journal of Poetry, Criticism and Translation, Stanford University, 2006-2008. 

Selected Conference Presentations:

"Unscored Librettos of Some Bearded Castro," Trans-American Studies Workshop, Stanford University, April 7, 2011 (scheduled)

"Periodization in the Poetry of the Americas," Institutions of Periodization, American Comparative Literature Association, Vancouver, March 31-April 3, 2011 (scheduled)

"Postwar Poetry and the Ruins of Inter-Americanism: Bishop, Neruda, Olson, Ginsberg," Northwestern University, February 8, 2011

"Fluent Mundo: Notes Toward an Inter-American Stevens," Wallace Stevens Society, American Literature Association, San Francisco, May 25, 2010

“‘The Continent from Pole to Pole’: Poetry and the Infrastructure of  Wartime Pan-Americanism”: Poetry of the Americas Colloquium, Princeton University, April 17, 2010

“The Renga and the Hoax: Poetry under the Cosmopolitan Mandate,” World Literature: Poetics/Performance/Publics, ACLA, New Orleans, April 1-4, 2010

“Elizabeth Bishop, *with Apologies to Pablo Neruda,” Cultural Synchronization and Disjuncture Workshop, Stanford University, February 5, 2010

"Sound Poetry as Genre," Melopoeisis: New Soundings in Music and Poetry (seminar panel), ACLA, Harvard University, March 26-29, 2009

“Hugo Ball’s Lautgedichte and International Language Systems,” Hermes Seminar, London, June 2008

“These Vast Imagination's Shrank: Vico's Giants and the Dimensions of the Human,” Stanford Aesthetics Workshop, May 2007

Selected Awards and Fellowships:

Geballe Dissertation Prize Fellowship, Stanford Humanities Center, 2011

Graduate Research Opportunity Grant for work at Fundación Pablo Neruda, Santiago de Chile, 2009

Ric Weiland Graduate Fellowship for outstanding third-year doctoral candidates, 2008-2010

Melanie Conroy

portrait:
Contact: 

mrconroy@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics
Curriculum Vitae: 

In September 2012, Melanie Conroy earned a Ph.D. in French at Stanford University, specializing in the literature and popular culture of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. She holds an M.A. in comparative literature from SUNY Buffalo and an M.A. in French literature from the University of Paris VIII.

Current Website.

Publications:

"Before the ‘Inward Turn’: Tracking Direct and Indirect Thought in the French Realist Novel," forthcoming in Poetics Today.
 “Comment se vendre: L’escroquerie et le marketing dans ‘La vie publique et privée de mossieu Réac’ de Nadar," forthcoming in Médias 19.
Spontaneity and Moral Certainty in Benjamin Constant’s Adolphe," Nineteenth-Century French Studies, 40.3-4.
Review of Femmes poètes du XIXe siècle: Une anthologie. Ed. Christine Planté. Nineteenth-Century French Studies, 39.3.

Conference Papers:

 “Comment se vendre: L’escroquerie et le marketing dans ‘La vie publique et privée de mossieu Réac’ de Nadar,” Presse, prostitution, bas-fonds dans l'espace médiatique francophone, Colloque international, Québec, Canada, June, 2012.
“Enrichissez-vous: Speculation in the comédies-vaudevilles and Balzac," American Association of Comparative Literature, Providence, Rhode Island, April, 2012.
“The Melodrama of History: Carlyle, Dickens, and Sand on the Morality of the Revolution,” Modern Language Association, Seattle, January, 2012.
“French Salons and Utopian Ideals,” French Culture Workshop, Stanford University, December, 2011.
“Above the Law: Reviving the Marquise de Brinvilliers,” Nineteenth-Century French Studies Conference, October, 2011.
“French Salons: Death or Renewal? The Case of Sophie Gay and Delphine de Girardin,” Humanities Education and Research Association, San Francisco, February, 2011.“Is Socialism the Opiate of the Masses?: Politics as Religion,” Modern Language Association, Philadelphia, December, 2009.
“The Cult of the Nobility: Nineteenth-Century Heraldry and Arms,” Nineteenth-Century French Studies Conference, S alt Lake City, Utah, October, 2009.
“Balzac and the Stock Market,” Nineteenth-Century French Studies Conference, Utah, October, 2009.
“Noble Signs, Bourgeois Readers ,” French Culture Workshop, Stanford University, May, 2009.
“Adolphe: The Necessary Destruction of Tradition, Spontaneity and Unreason,” University of Chicago, Romance Languages Graduate Conference, May, 2009.
“Anti-Romantic War Heroes: T.E. Lawrence and René Char,” Avatars: Personae, Heteronyms, Pseudonyms, Comparative Literature Graduate Conference, Stanford University, April, 2009.

Teaching Experience:

At Stanford, in spring of 2010, I taught "Nineteenth-Century French Fiction: Outsiders, Conspirators, and the Masses," an introduction to the realist and Romantic novel and nineteenth-century French culture. I also had the pleasure of being a teaching assistant for the "Philosophy and Literature" gateway course. I've also have taught the full range of French language classes at Stanford: the first-year course sequence, as well as first quarter of second-year French, and a part of the accelerated sequence.

Before coming to Stanford, I was a lectrice in France, first at the University of Paris VII and then at the École Normale Supérieure-Lettres et sciences humaines in Lyon. I taught graduate level courses in oral English, both academic and colloquial, as well as academic writing. In France, I had the opportunity to prepare students for the "Agrégation interne," as well as to teach English academic presentation skills to Francophones and to lead a French-to-English translation seminar.

Courses Taught:

Stanford University              

  • FRENLIT 148: Outsiders, Conspirators, and the Masses: Nineteenth-Century French Fiction. Looks at the emergence of new social types in nineteenth-century fiction: social climbers, dandies, amateur philosophers, impoverished students, master criminals, aspiring actresses, and political radicals. How do groups differentiate themselves in and by way of literature? Who belongs and who doesn’t? Which groups are heroized and which are villainized? Authors include Balzac, Stendhal, Sue, Nerval, Vigny, Flaubert, Zola. Taught in French. Spring 2010.
  • Philosophy and Literature. TA for Professors Lanier Anderson and Joshua Landy. Responsibilities included teaching a section, co-creating assignments, and reviewing undergraduate papers. Winter 2010.
  • French 1-3, 22, 5C: French language first and second year courses, including accelerated, taught in French. Responsibilities included helping intermediate novice speakers advance to the intermediate-mid level in French; use of the textbook Mais oui; use of multimedia, including films, online videos, computerized oral and written exams. Concentration on oral proficiency. 2007-2009.

École Normale Supérieure-LSH, Lyon, 2005-2006.
Lectrice d’anglais. Courses included academic writing in English and advanced oral English at the graduate level.

Université de Paris VII, Institut Charles V, Paris, 2002-2003.
Lectrice d’anglais. Instructor for courses including advanced oral English at graduate level; French to English translation (first year, thème 1 & 2); teacher preparation for English "Agrégation Interne."

University at Buffalo, NY, 2001-2005.
Instructor of English. Taught first-year composition (101 and 210, four semesters). Designed and taught: COL 160: Culture of Rebellion, on the pan-American Bildungsroman (Roy, Kerouac, Puig,  etc.).
 

Professional Activities:

2009-12: Graduate Coordinator, Philosophy and Literature, Stanford University
2009-10: Graduate Coordinator, French Culture Workshop, Stanford University
2009-10: Managing Editor, Republics of Letters, Stanford University
2008-09: Graduate Student Representative, Department of French and Italian, Stanford University
2008: Graduate Coordinator, Sports History and The Future of Sports, Stanford University
2008: Graduate Coordinator, The Republic of Letters, Stanford University
2007-08: Graduate Coordinator, Philosophical Reading Group, Stanford University
2007: Contributing Editor, Mantis: A Journal of Poetry, Criticism and Translation, Stanford University
 

Education: 

2006: M.A. in French Literature, University of Paris VIII
MA Thesis: "Le cercle vicieux: sur Le Baphomet de Pierre Klossowski," advisor: Jean-Michel Rey, program: texte, imaginaire, société
2005: M.A. in Comparative Literature, SUNY Buffalo
2000: B.A. in English Literature (Honors) and Creative Writing, University of Alberta

Ph.D. in French 2011-12 Whiting Fellow, Stanford University

Language(s): 
French

Gabriella Safran

portrait:
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 109
Phone: 650 723 4414
gsafran@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Thursdays 10-12
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Performance
Curriculum Vitae: 

 

Gabriella Safran has written on Russian, Polish, Yiddish, and French literatures and cultures.  Her most recent book, Wandering Soul:  The Dybbuk's Creator, S. An-sky (Harvard, 2010), is a biography of an early-twentieth-century Russian-Yiddish writer who was also an ethnographer, a revolutionary, and a wartime relief worker. 

Safran teaches and writes on Russian literature, Yiddish literature, folklore, and folkloristics.  She is now working on two projects:  a monograph investigating nineteenth-century short Russian and Yiddish fiction in the context of the history of listening, and an article looking at the interaction of the Russian and Jewish rhetorical traditions among early-twentieth-century revolutionaries.  

As the chair of the DLCL, Safran is increasingly interested in the reorganization of humanities departments and the implications of that for teaching, learning, and scholarship.

Education: 

Ph.D., Slavic Languages and Literatures, Princeton University, 1998.
B.A., magna cum laude, with honors in Soviet and East European Studies, Yale University, 1990.

 

Language(s): 
Hebrew
Language(s): 
Russian
Language(s): 
Yiddish

Gregory (Grisha) Freidin

portrait: Gregory (Grisha) Freidin
Office Hours: 
Fri 1:15-3:30, or by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Curriculum Vitae: 

I am interested, among other things, in contemporary Russian culture, literature, politics and society. I am now completing my long-standing project on the Russian Jewish writer Isaac Babel. Much has been done, including a series of essays, a definitive annotated edition of Babel's writings, letters, reminiscences and critical reception (Isaac Babel's Selected Writings.  Norton Critical Edition. W.W. Norton, 2009); a collection of essays on Babel's works and days (The Enigma of Isaac Babel, Stanford UP, 2009); what remains is a critical biography of the writer (A Jew on Horseback: The Worlds of Isaac Babel, Stanford UP) which I hope to bring to a close in 2012. An essay, based on a chapter, "Odessa - Mother of Isaac Babel," has just appeared in Russian in Neprikosnovennyi zapas 4 (2011). This will be my second critical biography of a major Russian author; the first, Coat of Many Colors , a study of the life and art of Osip Mandelstam, came out in 1987 (paperback, 2010) and, selectively, in Russian in the 1990s.  In 2004, as part of his Isaac Babel project, I organized an International Isaac Babel Conference and Workshop at Stanford, producing the U.S. premiere of Isaac Babel's play "Maria" (dir. By Carl Weber) and curating an exhibition on Babel at the Hoover Libraries and Archives. These Babel-related events have received a permanent lease on life in “Babel in California,” by Elif Batuman, the events’ participant observer, who opens with it her critically acclaimed collection Possessed (FSG, 2010).

Beginning in 1988, when I first returned to the USSR since coming to the US in 1971, and into the twenty first century, the main focus of my scholarly activity (research, conferences, publications, as well as participant observation) revolved around the changes taking place in my native Russia. In 1990, I produced the first translation into Russian of The American Federalist  (Американские федералисты, Chalidze Publications, 1990) that became an indispensable text in the drafting of the Russian Constitution (1993). One wide-ranging snapshot of the changes afoot in Russia was Russian Culture in Transition (Stanford, 1993) a collection of articles, including two of my own, by leading American and Russian students of contemporary Russian culture and cultural scene. Another was a collection of eyewitness accounts (including my own) of the failed putsch in Moscow in August 1991 that marked the end of communism in Russia and the dissoluition of the USSR: Russia at the Barricades (M.E. Sharpe, 1994). Yet another volume, much broader in scope, was Russia at the End of the Twentieth Century: Culture and Its Horizons in Politics and Society, based on the papers prepared and delivered at the international conference by the same name, I organized at Stanford in 1998. During this time, I also founded, together with Robert F. Ball, a publishing venture to produce a Russian version of Encyclopaedia Britannica that has subsequently evolved, with the help of the Open Society Institute, into the on-line Russian encyclopaedia KrugosvetSince the late 1980s, along with my research, scholarly writing and teaching, I have continued to observe and comment on cultural and political developments in Russia through large-circulation publications in Russia and the US, including The New Criterion, The New Republic, Los Angeles Times, Times Literary Supplement, Nezavisimaya Gazeta, Rossiiskaya gazeta, and Neprikosnovennyi zapas. As an expert on Russian culture and politicsI have appeared on the BBC 4, PBS, NPR, KQED, and VOA. More recently, I have inaugurated my own blog with the name borrowed from Osip Mandelstam's book or reminiscences, The Noise of Time.

My courses at Stanford represent the scope of my interests, cultural, literary, historical, philosophical, and sociological, but they do not exhaust them. Over the years, I have developed an interest in film criticism and photography, and I intend to pursue them in the future in teaching and research as well as practice. After completing my Isaac Babel project, I intend to turn to a volume on the subject that has been central to my research and thinking, Authorship and Citizenship: Russian Literature, Society and State in the Twentieth Century, a collection of my essays, some new, some already published. I have also continued to collaborate with Victoria E. Bonnell on a projected volume about the emergence of Russia as a nation state after the collapse of communism, Conjuring Up Russia: Symbols, Rituals, and Mythologies of National Identity, 1991-2004.

Since 2010, I have been keeping a blog, The Noise of Time/TNT, where I publish occasional pieces on Russian film, photography, and other odd subjects, like Leo Tostoy and the ife of bees.

On 1/1/2013, I became professor emeritus, recalled to duty in 2013-2015, that is to say, I will continue to be fully involved in the academic life of the department, DLCL, and the university, including teaching and advising, at least, for the next two years (through the fall quarter of AY 2014-2015).

Education: 

Ph.D. in Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of California at Berkeley, 1978.
Brandeis University, 1972.
The First State Institute of Foreign Languages, Moscow, USSR, 1969-71.

Advisees: 

Luke Parker

Jason Cieply

Language(s): 
Russian

Lisa Surwillo

portrait: Sylke Tempel
Contact: 

Pigott Hall 222
650 723 2175
surwillo@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
T 9 - 11 AM and by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Performance

Professor Surwillo teaches courses on Iberian literature, with an emphasis on nineteenth-century Spanish theater. Her research encompasses the questions of property, modernity and the individual as they are manifested by literary works, especially dramatic literature, dealing with colonial slavery, abolition and Spanish citizenship.

Surwillo is the author of The Stages of Property: Copyrighting Theatre in Spain (Toronto 2007), an analysis of the development of copyright and authorship in nineteenth-century Spain and the impact of intellectual property on theater. She is currently writing a book on depictions of slave traders in modern Spanish literature.

Education: 

2002: Ph.D., UC Berkeley, Romance Languages and Literatures
1994: B.A., University of Wisconsin, Madison, Spanish and History

Language(s): 
Spanish

Michael Predmore

portrait: Sylke Tempel
Contact: 

Pigott Hall 215
650 723 1920
predmore@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
MW 2:15 - 4:00PM and by appointment
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

A recipient of the Fulbright, Guggenheim, ACLS, and NEH fellowships, as well as fellowships from the Wisconsin and Stanford Humanities Centers, Michael P. Predmore has published several books and numerous articles on twentieth-century Spanish and Latin American literature. Among his best known books are: La obra en prosa de Juan Ramón Jiménez (1966, 1975), La poesía hermética de Juan Ramón Jiménez (1973), Una España joven en la poesía de Antonio Machado (1981), and scholarly editions of Platero y yo and Diario de un poeta reciencasado, both published by Cátedra.

Language(s): 
Spanish
Syndicate content