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The Short Films of Norma Talmadge, 1913: Reviews

Note, this is not necessarily all of the films for this year, just the ones for which I've been able to locate review or have viewing comments. For list of all the films, see the Filmography



O'Hara Helps Cupid
Stenographer Troubles
(with viewing comments and link to online video)
Just Show People
O'Hara's Godchild
Wanted--A Strong Hand
Belinda, the Slavey
Sleuthing
Oracles and Omens
The Midget's Revenge
A Lady and her Maid
(with viewing comments and link to online video)
The Silver Cigarette Case
'Arriet's Baby
Count Barber
O'Hara as Guardian Angel
Solitaires
(with viewing comments)
The Tables Turned
An Old Man's Love Story (with viewing comments)
Under the Daisies
Keeping Husbands Home
He Fell in Love with his Mother-In-Law
Extremities
The Other Woman
The Doctor's Secret
Father's Hatband
(with viewing comments and link to online video)
His Silver Bachelorhood
An Elopement at Home
Fanny's Conspiracy
The Honorable Algernon



O'Hara Helps Cupid

Released January 4, 1913. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: W.L. Tremayne. Cast: Hughie Mack, Kate Price, Van Dyke Brooke, Charles Edwards, Mrs. Mary Maurice, Norma Talmadge. 1000 ft

Review from Moving Picture World, January 25, 1913

"O'HARA HELPS CUPID (Vitagraph). January 11-This is the second O'Hara picture, and it makes a fair offering, but is not quite so good as the former, in which our kind-hearted friend acts as a peacemaker. In this he helps his friend Hughie Mack to win the love and lunch room of Widow Price, who is for some time undecided between him and Charles Edwards. Mrs. Maurice and Norma Talmadge also have parts. O'Hara is played, as usual, by Van Dyke Brooke, who is also the picture's producer. W.L. Tremayne wrote the script


Stenographer Troubles

Released February 1, 1913. Vitagraph. Director: Frederick A. Thomson. Author: Van Dyke Brooke. Cast: John Bunny, Flora Finch, Florence Turner, Lillian Walker, Clara Kimball Young, Norma Talmadge, Anita Stewart?. 1000 ft. Held by the Nederlands Filmmuseum (film and videocassette viewing copy, 35 mm, Dutch intertitles) and is available online.

Review from Moving Picture World, February 22, 1913

"STENOGRAPHER TROUBLES" (Vitagraph). Feb. 6.-One of the funniest Bunny pictures that has come out. The very best Vitagraph players have good roles, and it made a houseful roar with laughter. Flora Finch, as the stenographer who is acceptable to the boss, John Bunny, because he thinks there will be no danger of her flirting instead of working, draws a most astonishingly farcical character. When Florence Turner, Bunny's rather fiery wife, got in a rage on account of her the house bellowed. It most surely is a picture not to be missed. It is full of good character and full of laughter from beginning to end. Such a picture will repay special advertising.

Viewing comments

John Bunny is the boss in an office filled with randy men. His stenographers are pretty flirtatous as well, and he fires three of them (Lillian Walker, the third, is particularly funny as the insolent, candy gobbling typist). He puts a help-wanted ad in the paper and a bunch of women gather in the office. Norma Talmadge, wearing wire glasses, no makeup, and a hangdog expression, sits near the door and coughs. Clara Kimball Young boldly strides in, surveys the applicants and laughs at them, then rousts Norma out of her chair and sits down. Bunny comes in and rejects them one after another (much to Clara's annoyance after she has tried flirting with him). He finally picks Flora Finch, and the other men in the office don't bother her. But she's able to work her wiles on the Boss himself! She hasn't counted, though, on his angry wife. This film is quite funny and appears to be in good condition. This film is quite funny and appears to be in good condition. Print viewed: (online video at Thought Equity)


Just Show People

Released February 15, 1913. Vitagraph. Director, Van Dyke Brooke. Author: Walter C. Bellows. Cast: Norma Talmadge, with Leo Delaney, Courtenay Foote.. 1000 ft. A copy of this film is located at the National Film and Television Archive in London (35 mm.)

Review from Moving Picture World, March 8, 1913

"JUST SHOW PEOPLE" (Vitagraph). Feb. 18.-From the viewpoint of the exhibitor who wants to please his audience this is the best offering of today. It is an emotional, melodramatic picture which keeps us deeply in sympathy with a pretty circus performer and even with her drunken husband, the clown, who sometimes abuses her in small ways, but in the end proves himself a man even when intoxicated. A villain is provided of course to furnish the danger to the heroine. She is about to jump into a net with which he has tampered. The most important role in the pictures is that of her husband, the clown, and his tipsy struggles to save his wife, were watched with breathless interest. Leo Delanay, who takes the part, deserves much credit. Norma Talmadge also does very fine work; she too gives a decided touch of character to her part. Courtnay Foote is the villain. Walter C. Bellows, the author,has written a most interesting script which Van Dyke Brooke has carefully produced. The photography is fine.


O'Hara's Godchild

Released March 1, 1913. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: W.L. Tremayne. Cast: Van Dyke Brooke, Mrs. Maurice, Leo Delaney , Dorothy Kelly, Wiliam Shea, Kate Price, Robert Gaillord, Norma Talmadge. 1000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, March 15, 1913

"O'HARA'S GODCHILD" (Vitagraph). March 3.-We have had several of these delightful pictures dealing with three families of Irish extraction on the outskirts of Brooklyn. It was through O'Hara's kindly ministrations in a former picture that Sullivan's girl and O'Grady's boy got married. In this picture O'Hara acts another kindly part and helps the young parents out of difficulty. It makes a very acceptable offering of sentiment and laughter. The same players will be found as in the former pictures. Van Dyke Brooke is O'Hara; Mrs. Maurice, his wife. The young couple are Leo Delaney and Dorothy Kelly, William Shea and Kate Price are the Sullivans; Robert Gaillord is Mike O'Grady. W.L. Tremayne is the author, and it was produced by Van Dyke Brooke. The photography is of high quality.


Wanted-A Strong Hand

Released April 5, 1913.Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: Kate Price. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Van Dyke Brooke, Kate Price, Hughie Mack. A clip of this film is available from Archive Films

Review from Moving Picture World, April 26, 1913

"WANTED-A STRONG HAND" (Vitagraph). April 11.-Norma Talmadge, the child incorrigible, needs a "strong hand," so her father (Van Dyke Brooke) marries widow Price; but it makes no difference till the widow's little boy (Hughey Mack) comes. The fun comes most from the unexpected quarter from which the hand is supplied and a good deal of it is in Hughey. It surely made fun for the audience. The authoress is Widow Price herself. May she write more. The producer is Van Dyke Brooke.


Belinda, the Slavey

Released March 15, 1913.. Vitagraph. Author: Mrs. Breuil. Cast: Norma Talmadge, with Joseph Dowling, Florence Radinoff. 1000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, April 5, 1913

"BELINDA, THE SLAVEY" (Vitagraph). April 11.-This is the first of a series of Belinda farces that is to be released. Mrs. Breuil is the authoress and the script was produced by Burt Angeles. It is a farcical character picture and Florence Radinoff, as the boarding-house keeper, stands out in sharp contrast with the other funny characters who too often hide their humanity under the flat mask of clowns. The value of clown work comes mostly from its contrast with life, its unhumanity, and in such a picture as this, real comedy characters would have been of greater value. Mr. Dowling, who plays the grocer's boy, is comically tall and his physical peculiarity helps a good deal. Norma Talmadge, as Belinda, is fine, at times. It made some laughter, but not so much as we expected. The photography is clear.


Sleuthing

Released April 12, 1913. Vitagraph. Director: Bert Angeles. Scenario: Beta Breuil. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Florence Radinoff, Wally Van, Kate Price, Hughie Mack. Mr. Dowling. 1000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, May 3, 1913

"SLEUTHING" (Vitagraph). April 17.-The second of the "Belinda" series, produced by Bert Angeles from the script of Mrs. Breuil. It brings out very clearly the imitative faculty of Norma Talmadge, who has the role of the slavey, Belinda, and whose work in this picture furnishes most of the fun. There was no hearty laughter, and for the most part it was watched silently by an East Side 10-cent audience. Florence Radinoff is the boarding house keeper; Wally Van, the star boarder; Kate Price the cook; Mr. Dowling, the tall man, and Hughie Mack, the cop.


Oracles and Omens

Released May 3, 1913.Vitagraph. Author: Eliza G. Harral. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Florence Radinoff.

Review from Moving Picture World, May 17, 1913

"ORACLES AND OMENS" (Vitagraph). May 6.-This is the third of the Belinda series. It is written by Eliza G. Harral. It will make a lot of fun in a great many houses. The character work of Miss Florence Radinoff as the boarding-house keeper is excellent. Norma Talmadge as Belinda is good. There is a competent cast.


The Midget's Revenge

Released May 17, 1913. Vitagraph. Director: Bert Angeles. Author: Marguerite Bertasch. Cast: Norma Talmadge, with Lord Robert, Robert Gaillord, Josie Sadler, Grace Dowling, Florence Radinoff.

Review from Moving Picture World, June 7, 1913

"THE MIDGET'S REVENGE" (Vitagraph). May 23.-A pleasingly comical picture and made to utilize a number of theatrical "freaks" in a story of a players' boarding house. It made a lot of laughter and seemed to please. Lord Robert, the midget, plays a woman dwarf perfectly. It was written by Marguerita Bertasch and produced by Bert Angeles. The photography is good.


A Lady and her Maid

Released May 17, 1913. Vitagraph. Director: Burt Angeles. Author: Beta Breuil. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Florence Radinoff, Lillian Walker, James Morrison, Hughie Mack. 1000 ft. A copy of this film is located at the National Film and Television Museum in London (35 mm.) and at the Nederlands Filmmuseum in Amsterdam (film and videocassette viewing copy and available online

Review from Moving Picture World, June 7, 1913

"A LADY AND HER MAID" (Vitagraph). May 22.-This is No. 4 in the Belinda Series and, in the first half, it shows only the same qualities that are found in the former pictures; but even this part made laughter. In the middle, it changes and begins to show a real idea. It seemed a pity to us that this should have been treated in just this way, it was worthy of better handling and a comedy was spoiled to make a farce. We find the same players as in the former pictures. Mrs. Breuil is the authoress and Bert Angeles the director.

Viewing comments

This was the last film of the Belinda series, which featured Florence Radinoff and Norma Talmadge. According to the above review, the first part of the film was similar to the previous entries in the series, which probably means that those also had Florence Radinoff made up to be as ugly as possible as the landlady of the boarding house, and Norma played Belinda the slavey with Pippi Longstockings braids and blacked out teeth. After Florence is rejected by a handsome boarder and Norma mock-melodramatically chastises him, the ladies go to a beauty school for an extreme makeover. Lillian Walker serves as one of the makeup ladies, and Norma pays a visit to dentist Hughie Mack. When the lady and her maid return to the boarding house, they are so stunning that the men fall all over themselves for their attention, while they coolly fend them off. It's quite an amusing short, and the print is excellent.

Print viewed: DVD. Cento anni fa. Il cinema europeo del 1909. Edizioni Cineteca di Bologna, 2009. B & W, Italian and English intertitles. Available from the Cineteca de Bologna and online video at Thought Equity


The Silver Cigarette Case

Released June 14, 1913. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: W.A. Tremayne. Cast: Leo Delaney, Rosemary Theby, Robert Gaillord, Harry Northrup, Norma Talmadge, Van Dyke Brooke, Rose Tapley. 1000 ft. A copy of this film is available at the National Film and Television Museum in London (35 mm., end scene missing)

Review from Moving Picture World, June 28, 1913

"SILVER CIGARETTE CASE" (Vitagraph). June 16.-Van Dyke Brooke produces a good picture, one that will interest all the way. Much attention is paid to interiors. Leo Delaney and Rosemary Theby have the leads. Others in the cast are Robert Gaillord, Harry Northrup, Norma Talmadge, and the director.


'Arriet's Baby

Released June 14, 1913. Vitagraph. Cast: Norma Talmadge, with William Shea, Robert Gaillord, Charles Delaney.1000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, July 5, 1913

"'ARRIET'S BABY" (Vitagraph). June 21.-An unusually strong drama of humble life, with veterans Shea, Gaillord and Delaney in the leading roles, with, also, Miss Norma Talmadge as 'Arriet. This writer has never seen Miss Talmadge in such serious work, but she acquitted herself with distinction. Of the three men, it need only be said that they give of their best. There are moments of real pathos, one of these marking the return of the sailor and his meeting with 'Arriet. Another is the death of 'Arriet, in which, by the way, the sometimes painful features are noticeable for their absence. There is a baby, too, which, as the mother is dying, almost knowingly strokes the face of the sailorman who is to be its future protector.


Count Barber

Released July 5, 1913. Vitagraph. Director: Bert Angeles. Author: Mrs. Breuil. Cast: Norma Talmadge, with Florence Radinoff, Charles Eldridge. 1000 ft

Review from Moving Picture World, July 19, 1913

"COUNT BARBER" (Vitagraph). July 8.-This is No. 5 in the Belinda series. Now that Ophelia Sweet and Belinda have procured beauty for themselves, the former is looking for a "match." Belinda falls in love with a barber, whom she sees at work. Ophelia falls in love with the same man whom she thinks is a count. It makes a picture full of pretty scenes with a thread of fun which is largely due to the skillfull burlesquing of the players: Norma Talmadge, Florence Radinoff and Charles Eldridge. It was produced by Bert Angeles from Mrs. Breuil's script.


O'Hara as Guardian Angel

Released July 12, 1913. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Scenario: W. L. Tremayne. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Van Dyke Brooke, Joseph Baker, Beatrice McKay. 1000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, July 26, 1913

"O'HARA AS GUARDIAN ANGEL" (Vitagraph). July 14.-Another of the O'Hara series, but not so good as the others. No series can hold up very long, and the astonishing thing is that W.A. Tremayne, the author, has found so many good stories for this character. A new character is introduced, Bob, played by Joseph Baker, who makes love to Aileen (Norma Talmadge), and O'Hara (Van Dyke Brooke) is on hand to save her from him. The other characters are the same, except that Beatrice McKay, a little girl next door, is also introduced. The plot is weak and rather illogical. The photography is fair. It was produced by Van Dyke Brooke.


Solitaires

Released July 5, 1913. 500 ft. Vitagraph. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Leo Delaney. Copies of this film are located at the Library of Congress (35 mm., Dutch intertitles, repatriated to the AFI collection from the Nederlands Filmarchives) and online video at Thought Equity

Viewing comments

Solitaires (1913), or Onwetend Verloofd as this Dutch print was called--i dont know if it was Dutch or Danish, but it was a cute short and the action was pretty clear. Again some decomp and a few titles were illegible, which didn't matter a whole lot in this case. Leo Delaney for some reason asks Norma accompany him to the jewelry store and try on rings. Someone sees them and pretty soon everyone assumes they are engaged and gives them wedding gifts, much to Norma's annoyance (he just seems to think it's funny). Anyway, this was enjoyable.
Print viewed: 35 mm Reel at the Library of Congress.


The Tables Turned

Released July 12, 1913. Vitagraph. Director: Charles Kent. Scenario: Winifred Dutcher. Cast: Kate Price, Dorothy Kelly, Norma Talmadge, B.F. Clinton. 1000 ft. A copy of this film is located at the National Film and Television Archive in London (35 mm.)

Review from Moving Picture World, August 9, 1913

"THE TABLES TURNED" (Vitagraph). July 25.-A little study of human life, not great, but acceptable and interesting. Kate Price is that kind of invalid who, when no one is looking, will slip down to the pantry. She has the tantrums and is making life a burden for her sister, Mrs. B.F. Clinton, and her two nieces, Dorothy Kelly and Norma Talmadge. The picture shows us how she behaved and then how she is cured. It is amusing and seemed to please. Winifred Dutcher wrote the script which Charles Kent produced. It is clearly photographed.


An Old Man's Love Story

Released July 19, 1913. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: W.A. Tremayne. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Van Dyke Brooke, Florence Radinoff, James Lackay. Frank O'Neil. 1000 ft. This film is available on video

Review from Moving Picture World, August 9, 1913

"AN OLD MAN'S LOVE STORY" (Vitagraph). July 24.-There have been greater pictures with more significant stories, but we doubt whether there have been many better or more pleasing in this showing of natural, human things. The story is by W.A. Tremayne and has been skillfully planned to go upon the screen. The picture's real quality comes from the way the script has been handled by the producer, stage manager and artists. The unconstrained naturalness of its characters is its best charm, but not its only high quality by any means; for camera man and nearly everyone else concerned have worked together to an end that is truly worth while. The second best quality that we notice is the economy of its action, the things that it didn't show delight us greatly; we are bothered with nothing our eyes would picture for ourselves and miss no link that our imagination needs.

Florence Radinoff and James Lackeye play the parents of a daughter, Norma Talmadge, who they want to marry a rich old man, Van Dyke Brooke. To show how vividly the players have imagined the situation, we pick out one of many good incidents. The father is about to offer the rich, prospective son-in-law, Van Dyke Brooke, a cigar, and we can tell by the way he handles them that he has provided himself with real good ones for the occasion. James Lackeye does the picture's best work, but Florence Radinoff is very close to him in truth, and Norma Talmadge is charming in her interpretation of the situation's emotional content. Frank O'Neil, as the young man, is fine, except in his entrance into the room after he has been adopted by the old man, who plays his role with quiet dignity. There is much credit due the producer, Van Dyke Brooke, for his direction of the players, which is perfect. A desirable release.

Viewing comments

An Old Man's Love Story (1913), is quite a good one. Norma's rather nasty parents want her to marry a rich man and forbid her to see the young man whom she loves. A wealthy older friend of her parents arrives and proposes to Norma. Her distress is evident though she accepts the proposal, and, being a kindly man, he sizes up the situation and arranges an ending to satisfy all concerned. Norma is very sweet and sympathetic ingenue, and looks very fetching in the lovely gowns of the period. As well as directing, Brooke gives a very appealing performance as the old man. There are some interesting lighting effects in some of the indoor sequences.

Print viewed: Videotape: The Films of Norma Talmadge (1911-1916). B & W. The tape runs approximately two hours and has an appropriate musical score. The Films of Norma Talmadge is now available on DVD from Grapevine Video, though the films are the same analog transfers as were on the videotape, which Jack Hardy notes on his site.


Under the Daisies

Released September 20, 1913.Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: Mrs. Owen Bronson. Cast: Leo Delaney, Norma Talmadge, Harry Northrup, Van Dyke Brooke, Charles Eldridge. 2000 ft. Copies of this film are located at the Library of Congress (35 mm., deteriorated) and the New Zealand Film Archive in Wellington (35 mm. nitrate, deteriorated)

Review from Moving Picture World, August 2, 1913

"Under the Daisies." There are many things to admire besides settings and acting in the feature play "Under the Daisies," and perhaps the foremost is the affecting poem on which it is based. It chiefly concerns the bad conduct of a dramatic critic-it is about time his villainy is shown up on the screen-who starts on his downward path by cynical observations on the agonizing efforts of an unsuccessful playwright. As nearly all well-known dramatists of to-day have found their way into one of the most trying of professions through channels of criticism, the selective taste of one serving to determine how much an what kind of creative work of the other will be suited to the tastes of a mixed audience, the playwright in this case is of a theatrical kind, one who uses a pen or pencil in writing and gazes at vacancy in search of inspiration. A very large proportion of authors in real life do nothing of the kind. Perhaps that is why the dramatist in the story failed to make a hit.

The critic in this case receives a large conditional inheritance at the age of thirty-he gets it if he does not wed before the age of thirty-five. The first logical consequence of this ban on his freedom of action is his falling in love with a country girl first seen in a field of daisies. He lures her to the city under promise of marriage but defers that formality after arrival for obvious reasons. When the time comes for him to keep his promise, he has enjoyed the sweetness of the girl's youth and it has lost flavor. He discards her in a beautiful and touching scene at the end of the first reel. The girl drags wearily back home, sits down among the "daisies for remembrance " and writes her last letter to the man who has elected to destroy all that was left of her bright dream and her final communication is directed by force of circumstances into the hands of the playwright. He reads that,
"Thus forever throughout the world,
"In love a sorrow proving,
"There's many a sad, sad thing in life,
"But the saddest of all is loving,"

He displays a sagacity in using this information and writes a successful play on the theme of the unfortunate girl's love. The critic sees it and perceives for the first time the ignominious role he has performed, or possibly realizes that he has lost a valuable asset in the death of a woman's devotion, and the dramatist he criticized to the latter's ultimate advantage becomes an unconscious and indirect instrument of retaliation.

The ends of justice may be served so far as the critic's conduct towards the girl is concerned, but there is some cloudiness about the ends served between man and man. Appearances strongly indicate that the dramatist was theorizing his way to continued failure when the critic drove him to actual life for a theme and its presentation. Then, while the actor may dearly hate a critic, the man who does creative intellectual work is usually modest enough and wise enough to seek from critical sources such information as may better his product. The honest truth is that the supposed antagonism between playwrights and critics is a myth. Men of mark in both professions have usually worked in both; there exists a decided readiness among them to assist one another; one of the most agreeable phases of literary and critical work is a cordiality and helpfulness of relation. If there is any real enmity it is that of the "perfesh" for any and all critics. On this account-I usually praise actors-I will not let the gentleman who impersonated an author in this play know how little he looked like a man occupied in tremendous intellectual concentration, such as is required by this review, nor the gentleman who impersonated a critic that it is not the proper thing to give out an opinion by facial expression or otherwise in advance of publication, because both of these actors are entirely capable of doing anything they understand, capable of doing it so well that they do not hesitate to admit it. If, by way of creative criticism, I could benefit other actors by few suggestions, I would show how the interpreters of this play might have made it more effective, but as performers rarely have time to read anything that does not pertain directly to themselves my helpful spirit would be dissipated on desert air. No one who has not been long engaged in critical and creative work, who has been heartsick hundreds of times over weak, stale, pointless, forced, artificial, theatrical productions, the other fellow's or his own, can appreciate what a pleasure it was for me to watch three interesting screen presentations in succession. Work that used to be spiritless toil is now becoming a pleasure, thanks to the intelligence and good taste of such leaders in production as the Vitagraph company.

[Omitted, photo, probably a field of daisies with someone standing in it. The caption reads: "Scene from 'Under the Daisies' (Vitagraph)"]

Review from Moving Picture World, October 18, 1913

"UNDER THE DAISIES" (Vitagraph), Sept. 27.-For this two-part picture Mrs. Owen Bronson has written a script of sustained pathos. Van Dyke Brooke is the producer; and, like all of his work, this is carefully executed. The staging of the scene of the play is unusually effective. The frame is of the stage' the background is of an open field. Norma Talmadge,Leo Delaney and Harry Northrup have the leads. The interpretation of each is restrained and yet strong.


Keeping Husband Home

Released August 9, 1913. Vitagraph. Director, Bert Angeles. Author: R. Haskell. Cast: Lillian Walker, Robert Gaillord, Hughie Mack, Florence Radinoff, Norma Talmadge, Henry Lambert. 1000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, August 30, 1913

"KEEPING HUSBANDS HOME" (Vitagraph). August 14.-A risqué offering. We recommend exhibitors to go slow if their audiences are particular.


He Fell in Love with his Mother-In-Law

Released August 23, 1913.Vitagraph. Director: Bert Angeles. Author: Page Spencer. Cast: Rose Tapley, Norma Talmadge, Tom Morrison, Florence Radinoff.

Review from Moving Picture World, September 13, 1913

"HE FELL IN LOVE WITH HIS MOTHER-IN-LAW" (Vitagraph), August 28th.-That the way o a man's heart is through his stomach is corroborated in this comedy by Page Spencer. The two young things, artists (Tom Morrison and Norma Talmadge), get married. Tom doesn't know how to cook and Norma sticks her nose at it on account of high art. Mother comes and teaches Norma a lesson in how to keep a man's affection. In the first scenes it seems rather crude and furnishes no comedy, but when Florence Radinoff comes into the picture it rises to comedy and we can't help thinking that she had a good deal to do with this through her acting and the contagion of it, although the script, it so happens, woke up at this point too. Bert Angeles, the director, kept the plot running smoothly and, so far as possible, naturally. The photography is excellent.


Extremities

Released September 20, 1913. Vitagraph. Director: Maurice Costello. Author: Beta Breuil. Cast: Clara Kimball Young with Norma Talmadge, Maurice Costello, William V. Ranous.

Review from Moving Picture World, October 4, 1913

"EXTREMITIES" (Vitagraph), September 23.-This picture of which only the hands or the feet of the players appear in the scenes, suggests a better one by the Edison Company, which used the same idea and was called "A Comedy of Understanding." The idea has not been overplayed and many will think it a clever offering.


The Other Woman

Released September 20, 1913. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: Lillian Sweetser. Cast: Leo Delaney, Norma Talmadge, Ada Gifford, Helene Costello. 1000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, October 11, 1913

"THE OTHER WOMAN" (Vitagraph), Sept. 24.-A brand new situation, so far as we know, gives more than usual interest to this picture. It is also well developed, too; but perhaps the promise was better than the fulfillment. The two women, one the wife and the other the inamorata of the man, are at the same beach hotel and have become friends since neither suspects. The husband doesn't know that the actress is at that hotel and he is coming to visit his wife, who has their little daughter with her. Coming out on the beach, he finds the child distressed because her mother, out swimming, has called for help. The man is just in time to help the other woman carry the almost drowned wife out of the water. The last scene shows the actress back in the city, lonesome but proudly destroying the man's portrait, while the man is happy with his family. The staging is very careful and the picture is a good offering. Written by Lillian Sweetser, it was produced by Van Dyke Brooke. Leo Delaney plays the man; Norma Talmadge, the wife; Ada Gifford, the other woman, and Helen Costello, the child.


The Doctor's Secret

Released October 18, 1913. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: W.A. Tremayne. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Van Dyke Brooke, Leo Delaney, William Shea, Charles Kent, Frank Mason, Helene Costello, Charles Slaten. 1000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, Nov. 8, 1913

"THE DOCTOR'S SECRET" (Vitagraph), October 23.-The plot was carefully written by W.A. Tremayne, and van Dyke Brooke has skillfully and artistically produced it into a fine picture. But it will be liked on account of its characters rather than its story, which is not of real life and demands a mental reservation on the spectator's part. The acting is of high order and the scenes and the lighting very effective.


Father's Hatband

Released October 25, 1913 Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: Monte Katterjohn. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Van Dyke Brooke, Leo Delaney, Flora Finch, Helen Lindroth. 1000 ft. A copy of this film is located at the Nederland's Filmmuseum in Amsterdam. This film is available on video and online.

Review from Moving Picture World, Nov. 15, 1913

"FATHER'S HATBAND" (Vitagraph), October 29.-Father's hatband is Cupid's mail carrier between home on one hand and the office on the other, and the clerk whom father doesn't want as his son-in-law. Father stops at the barber shop and there changes hats with Mr. Henpecko. This adds to the fun considerably. This is surely a novel situation and it has been well worked up into a delightful comedy offering, the best and most desirable picture of today's regular releases.

Viewing comments

Nederlands Filmmuseum verision: The Nederlands Film Archives print is much sharper and more complete than the Grapevine version. The Grapevine is missing the beginning scene of the lovers meeting in the Father's office that establishes the plot. The Nederlands print has a series of nicely staged shots involving a hat rack with a mirror next to a staircase that are quite spoiled in the Grapevine version, which is cropped at the edges and has lost a few frames at the end of the first sequence. Curiously, the last scene is cropped too closely at the top in the Nederlands version, while the Grapevine version is cropped at the bottom but preserves more of the top of the frame. The Grapevine version runs a bit faster. Talmadge is animated and expressive, perhaps overly so, but she is amusing and not afraid to look a little silly. Print viewed: (online video at Thought Equity)

Grapevine version: Norma and boyfriend Leo Delaney arrange meetings by passing notes back and forth in the band of father Brooke's hat. An accidental switching of hats leads an enraged Flora Finch to think that her unsuspecting husband is meeting Norma, and all parties involved end up at the trysting place of the lovers at the same time. The print is very faded, which is unfortunate since it is a film of considerable charm. Print viewed: Videotape: The Films of Norma Talmadge (1911-1916). B & W. The tape runs approximately two hours and has an appropriate musical score. The Films of Norma Talmadge is now available on DVD from Grapevine Video, though the films are the same analog transfers as were on the videotape, which Jack Hardy notes on his site.


His Silver Bachelorhood

Released November 1, 1913. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: M.F. Carney. Cast: NT, with Leo Delaney, Harry Northrup, Helen Lindroth, Rosemary Theby, Robert Gaillord. 1000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, Nov. 15, 1913

"HIS SILVER BACHELORHOOD (Vitagraph), November 14.-There is a touch of mawkish sentimentality in the lst two scenes of this offering; but its situation was carefully developed by its author, and its leading woman, Norma talmadge, has kept it strong by intelligent and well-held-in acting. Her work in it will add to her reputation for versatility. There was only one other picture among today's offerings that gave as much to the audience or that was watched as closely. A picture with strongly acted scenes and, as a while, a good offering.


An Elopement at Home

Released November 8, 1913. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: Vera Hurst. Cast: NT, with Leo Delaney, Van Dyke Brooke, Hughie Mack, William Shea. 1000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, Nov. 29, 1913

"AN ELOPEMENT AT HOME" (Vitagraph), November 12.-A comedy that surely tickled the audience; there was hearty laughter in which the reviewer joined. The author, Vita Hurst, has built up her climax to include an astonishing number of fresh elements of fun and gets it over in good shape. Van Dyke Brooke produced it.


Fanny's Conspiracy

Released November 8, 1913. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: A.A. Methley Cast: NT, with Van Dyke Brooke, Ethel Lloyd, Narry Northrup Leo Delaney. 1000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, Nov. 29, 1913

"FANNY'S CONSPIRACY" (Vitagraph), November 14.-A light comedy offering, in which the young wife attempts to reduce her husband's weight by secretly doctoring his coffee. The hired girl suspects her of attempting to poison him, and quite an amusing situation results. The torn note was an ingenious feature. Many quiet smiles in this.


The Honorable Algernon

Released December 20, 1913. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: W.A. Tremayne. Cast: NT, with Leo Delaney, Hughie Mack, Josie Sadler. 1000 ft. Vitagraph.

Review from Moving Picture World, January 10, 1914

"THE HONORABLE ALGERNON" (Vitagraph), December 23. -This is a very creditable attempt at refined comedy and is sure to please. The types as in most Vitagraph productions are selected with rare judgment and the acting is good from beginning to end. Some of the situations are contrived with great cleverness and finish is most amusing




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Last revised, January 24, 2012

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