Posts Tagged ‘apple mail’

Techie Tip of the Week: Send Email on Behalf of Another

Friday, July 1st, 2011

Are you ever in the situation where you need to send an email for someone else? For example, does your boss ever ask you to send an email on your boss’s behalf? You probably don’t want YOUR email address to be listed as the from — it’s really from the other person; you’re just sending it. If you send it directly, and someone responds, the response will come directly to you, not the person who really is sending it.

Fortunately, email programs make it relatively easy to send email on behalf of another. In today’s techie tip, we’ll show you how.

Outlook 2007/2010:
1) Compose a new message.
2) In the Message window, click Options.
3) In Show Fields, click From.
4) In From, enter the email address of the person for whom you are sending the email (e.g., your boss’s email address).
5) Compose and send your email as you otherwise normally would do.

Apple Mail:
1) Compose a new message.
2) Click the drop-down menu next to the Subject: field.
3) Click the Reply-To Address Field.
4) In the Reply To field, enter the email address of the person for whom you are sending the email (e.g., your boss’s email address).
5) Compose and send your email as you otherwise normally would do.

Stanford Webmail:
1) Log into Stanford Email (http://webmail.stanford.edu)
2) Click the Preferences tab.
3) In the Mail preferences, click Accounts.
4) In the Accounts section, click Add Persona.
5) In the Persona Settings section, enter a name in the Persona Name field (e.g., your boss’s name).
6) In the From field, enter the name and email address of the person for whom you are sending the email (e.g., your boss’s email address).
7) Click Save.
8) Compose a new message.
9) In the From field, click the drop-down menu, and select the desired Persona (e.g., your boss).
10) Compose and send your email as you otherwise normally would do.

Techie Tip of the Week: Automate Your Email With Rules/Filters

Friday, June 24th, 2011

In most modern email programs, you can automate the handling of your email by setting up rules (sometimes rules are called “filters”) that are applied you open your mail. For example, you can set up a rule to automatically shunt all email from your supervisor into a special folder/mailbox. Or suppose you want all email from your favorite email distribution list to be color-coded automatically. Rules/filters can do that automatically for you!

To set up a rule in Apple Mail:

  1. In Apple Mail, on the Mail menu, click Preferences.
  2. Click Rules.
  3. Click Add Rule
  4. In the Description field, enter a name for the rule.
  5. Define the conditions for the rule (e.g., if the email matches my supervisor’s email).
  6. Define the actions for the rule (e.g., move message to a mailbox I’ve set up to hold my supervisor’s email).
  7. Click OK.

To set up a rule in Outlook:

  1. In Outlook 2003 and 2007, on the Tools menu, click Rules and Alerts. In Outlook 2010, click the File tab, and then click Manage Rules and Alerts.
  2. Click New Rule.
  3. In the section Start from a blank rule, select Check messages when they arrive. Then, click Next.
  4. In Step 1, check the desired condition (e.g., Move messages from someone to a folder).
  5. In Step 2, click the blue, underlined links and provide the appropriate information (e.g., if the blue link is “people or public group”, I might enter my supervisor’s email address; if the blue link is “specified folder”, I might select the folder I’ve set up to hold my supervisor’s email).
  6. Click Next.
  7. Select any desired exceptions and then click Next again.
  8. Check the Run this rule now on messages already in “Inbox” and Turn on this rule boxes.
  9. Click Finish, and then click OK.

To set up a filter in Stanford Email (Webmail):

  1. Click the Preferences tab.
  2. Click the Mail Filters tab, and then click New Filter.
  3. In the Filter Name field, enter a name for the filter.
  4. In the first pull-down menu, select the desired header for the filter (e.g., From).
  5. In the second pull-down menu, select the desired condition (e.g., contains).
  6. In the text field, enter the desired condition (e.g., my supervisor’s email address).
  7. In the Perform the following actions area, in the pull-down menu, select the desired action (e.g., File into folder, and then select the folder I’ve set up to hold my supervisor’s email).
  8. Click OK.
  9. Click the Mail button to return to your Inbox.

Techie Tip of the Week: Redirecting Email

Friday, March 25th, 2011

Suppose someone sends you an email that was really intended for somebody else. You could forward the email to the right person, but if you forward it, and that person replies, the reply will be sent to you, not to the original sender. A better choice is to redirect the email.

Example: Sally thinks she has written an email to Professor Smith, but actually sends it to the office manager, Tom. If Tom forwards the message to Professor Smith, and Professor Smith replies, the reply will be sent to Tom (and not Sally). BUT, if Tom redirects the email to Professor Smith, when Professor Smith replies, the reply will be send directly to Sally.

Here’s how to redirect an email using Outlook 2007:

  1. Open the email to be redirected.
  2. In the Message tab, click Other Actions.
  3. Click Resend this message.
  4. A warning window appears: “You do not appear to be the original sender of this message. Are you sure you wish to resend it?” Click Yes.
  5. In the To field, enter the email address of the person for whom the email was originally intended.
  6. Click Send.
Here’s how to redirect an email using Apple Mail:
  1. Open the email to be redirected.
  2. On the Message menu, click Redirect.
  3. In the To field, enter the email address of the person for whom the email was originally intended.
  4. Click Send.