National Report Card on Poverty and Inequality

state of the union

The Stanford Conference on the State of the Union
January 13, 2014, 11am-3pm

On January 13th, 2014, the 50th anniversary of the War on Poverty, the Center on Poverty and Inequality hosted The State of the Union on Poverty and Inequality.

The featured event: The Center’s release of its first annual Report Card on Poverty and Inequality, a report that covers seven domains: labor markets, poverty, the safety net, income inequality, wealth inequality, health inequality and education. Authored by the country’s top experts, the report provides key data at both the state and national levels on efforts to reduce inequality and equalize opportunity.

Roster of Experts:

Labor Markets

  • Michael Hout, Professor of Sociology, New York University
  • Erin Cumberworth, National Poverty Fellow, Center on Poverty and Inequality, Stanford University

Poverty

  • Sheldon Danziger, President, Russell Sage Foundation, and University Professor of Public Policy, University of Michigan
  • Christopher Wimer, Research Scientist, Columbia Population Research Center, Columbia University

Safety Net

  • Karen Jusko, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Stanford University
  • Katherine Weisshaar, National Poverty Fellow, Center on Poverty and Inequality, Stanford University

Income Inequality

  • Timothy Smeeding, Director, Institute for Research on Poverty, and Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor of Public Affairs, University of Wisconsin
  • Jeffrey Thompson, Economist, Federal Reserve Board

Wealth Inequality

  • Edward N. Wolff, Professor of Economics, New York University, and Research Associate, National Bureau of Economic Research

Health Inequality

  • Sarah Burgard, Associate Professor of Sociology and Epidemiology, University of Michigan
  • Molly King, National Poverty Fellow, Center on Poverty and Inequality, Stanford University

Education

  • Sean Reardon, Professor of Education, Stanford University

On January 13th we launched a united national, state, and local conversation on poverty and inequality. You can still experience the live presentations – video is coming soon. Members of the press, please use our contact page if you have any questions or to arrange an interview with any of the Center's researchers.

The CPI, which is part of the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences, is generously supported by the Elfenworks Foundation and Stanford University. Partial funding for this research came from a grant to the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality from The Russell Sage Foundation. The United Way of the Bay Area also generously supported this initiative. The Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality is funded by Grant Number AE00101 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, awarded by the Substance Abuse Mental Health Service Administration. The contents of this report are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation) or the Substance Abuse Mental Health Service Administration.