About Lyman

For information about Lyman mailing lists, please see the Mailing Lists page

Lyman is a graduate apartment complex consisting of 112 single-student two-bedroom apartments. There are two residence buildings and one common building that houses the laundry room, mailroom, a TV lounge, a study center with computers, and table tennis and Fooseball tables. The main Lyman common space is the Atrium, and can be reserved by residents for private events (see Reserving the Lyman Atrium).

Lyman is staffed by 5 Community Associates (CAs), a Residence Dean (RD), a Resident Computer Coordinator (RCC), a Facilities Supervisor and facilities staff. We hold a social event approximately weekly so that residents can socialize with their neighbors.

Overview

Richard W. Lyman Graduate Residences

In 1997, the award-winning Richard W. Lyman Graduate Residences opened 112 two-bedroom apartments to 224 single students. Located on the west side of campus, the complex is close to the Medical Center and the Science and Engineering quad. Each apartment offers about 575 square feet of space. A circular commons, organized around a 60-foot-tall oak tree, includes a large lounge with kitchen, TV lounge, piano practice room, computer cluster, mail room, and laundry room.

The Residences

Living Room Kitchen Bedroom Bathroom
Top View

General Information

Residence Name Richard W. Lyman Graduate Residences
Neighborhood Westside
Mailing Address Stanford, CA 94305
Building 1
Jing Lyman Commons
Building 3

121 Campus Drive West, Building A
121 Campus Drive West, Building B

121 Campus Drive West, Building C

Housing
Front Desk
Governor’s Corner Housing Front Desk
Year Built 1997
Year Renovated N/A
Housing Category Graduate
Residence Type Apartments
Custodial Service University managed
Dining Service Kitchens provided; optional Stanford Dining or student-managed plan
Construction For information on projects in, around, or near student housing facilities, please visit the Construction and Renovation page

Accessibility

Wheelchair accessible for living   Yes
Wheelchair accessible for visiting   Yes
Braille signage   Yes
Additional information   Some apartments equppied with horn or strobe fire alarms, flashing doorbell

Furnishings

General Bedroom Living/Dining Kitchen
Wall-to-wall carpeting Extra-long twin bed Table with four chairs Four-burner stove with oven
Wall coverings Desk and chair Sofa Refrigerator/freezer

High-speed internet connections from
each bedroom and
living room

Bookcase Upholstered chair Sink with garbage disposal
Dresser Storage cabinet  
  Waste basket and recycling bin TV/end table  
    Coffee table in some apartments  
       
Note:
  • Students who want to bring their own beds may store the University supplied bed at their own expense. No storage is available for unneeded furniture.
  • Students provide their own cookware, dishes, utensils, towels, and other kitchen items.

Common Areas

Atrium Lounge Laundry Room Piano Practice Barbecue Area

Lounges and Meeting Rooms

The Atrium Lounge holds up to 60 people and is available for social events and meetings, though this lounge must be booked in advance. The spacious, carpeted room has glass, garage-style doors that fold up into the ceiling, opening the lounge to the wooden deck outside. This lounge also has a large fireplace and kitchen.

TV Lounge

A small TV lounge has several sofas, a TV, and a VCR. It also is available on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Sitting Lounge

A sitting lounge, useful for meetings or as student study room, has tables and chairs that can accommodate up to 12 people. The lounge is available on a first come, first-serve basis.

Laundry Rooms

A laundry room in the Commons is equipped with environmentally-friendly washers and dryers. Rent includes Student Housing’s "Just Like Home" laundry program, which gives residents unlimited use of these washers and dryers; no coins or cards required.

Storage

Storage space, either for personal belongings or unwanted furniture, is limited to individual apartments. Residents must store unwanted furniture off campus at their own expense and are responsible for returning it in good condition before checking out.

A Lyman resident who wants to store Lyman furniture from any common area in the apartment must get approval from his or her roommate since both are jointly liable for anything missing or damaged.

Computer Clusters

Lyman’s computer cluster is equipped with Macintosh and Dell computers, laser printers, and commonly-used software applications. Printing is charged to the University debit card system.

Piano Practice Room

Lyman Commons also has a small music practice room with a baby grand piano. It is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Recreation

Lyman is located next to the golf driving range and across the street from several tennis courts. A hiking and running trail along Lake Lagunita extends to the Stanford foothills.

Mail room

Lyman residents use their apartment keys to collect their mail from private mail boxes in the Lyman mail room.

Bicycle storage

Lyman’s covered bicycle corrals, locked and fenced bicycle enclosures, provide dry, secure bike parking.

Barbecue Area

Barbecue grills are located outside of the Lyman Common Building. They are available on a first-come, first-served basis and cannot be reserved.

Gender-Neutral Housing Pilot Project

Student Housing has launched a gender-neutral housing program in Lyman, Munger and Rains to allow students to live in an apartment with mixed gender.

Students will not be randomly assigned to a mixed gender room or apartment. Students will live only with coed roommates of their choosing and must completely occupy the apartment.

For more information regarding this policy, please read the gender-neutral information online.

History

Lyman Graduate Residences, designed by Tanner Leddy Maytum Stacy architects, are named for Richard W. Lyman, Stanford’s seventh president (1970-1980).

The commons building is named for his wife, Jing Lyman, who is internationally and nationally known for her leadership in public programs ranging from fair housing to gender equity.

Lyman, an expert in contemporary British history, joined Stanford’s History Department in 1958 and became president in September 1970. During his tenure, Lyman coped with the activism that rocked campuses nationwide in the 1970s—he was outspoken and enjoyed the give-and-take of argument—as well as the economics of double-digit inflation, oil shortages, and a declining stock market.

Nonetheless, under Lyman’s leadership, the University raised $132 million for its endowment and additional funds for buildings, endowed chairs, and student financial aid. Lyman’s tenure also saw an increase in the numbers and influence of women and members of ethnic minorities as faculty and students.