David N Plank's picture
David Plank

Before joining PACE in January 2007, David N. Plank was a Professor at Michigan State University, where he founded and directed the Education Policy Center. He was previously on the faculties at the University of Pittsburgh and at the University of Texas at Dallas, where he taught courses and conducted research in the areas of educational finance and policy. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1983. Plank is the author or editor of six books, including the AERA Handbook on Educational Policy Research. He has published widely in a number of different fields, including economics of education, history of education, and educational policy. His current interests include the role of the State in education, and the relationship between academic research and public policy. In addition to his work in the United States, Plank has extensive international experience. He has served as a consultant to international organizations including the World Bank, the United Nations Development Program, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the United States Agency for International Development, the Ford Foundation, and also to governments in Africa and Latin America. He may be reached at dnplank@stanford.edu (650) 721-2422

Nov 30th, 2011 | 11:03 AM

The latest PPIC poll on higher education in California was released last month, and the findings will bring no cheer to our state’s public colleges and universities. On the bright side, most respondents affirm that a strong higher education system is important for California’s future, and they agree that recent budget cuts are causing...

Jun 6th, 2011 | 09:38 AM

Economists draw a useful distinction between two kinds of equity, horizontal and vertical.  The principle of horizontal equity holds that equals should be treated equally.  For example, third graders in poor school districts should receive the same level of funding and the same quality of education as those in wealthier school districts.  All students should be held to the same high expectations regardless...