A blog for the informed discussion of California's education policy challenges.

Recent Posts

Feb 1st, 2011
William Perez | 09:25 PM | Post Secondary Education
Continuing two decades of declining state support for higher education, Brown has proposed cutting $500 million each from the University of California and California State University systems, and $400 million from community colleges. These cuts are expected to lead to increased fees and reduced enrollment. Community college students' fees would climb from $26 per credit unit to $36. Chancellor Jack Scott...
Feb 1st, 2011
William Perez | 09:25 PM | Post Secondary Education
Continuing two decades of declining state support for higher education, Brown has proposed cutting $500 million each from the University of California and California State University systems, and $400 million from community colleges. These cuts are expected to lead to increased fees and reduced enrollment. Community college students' fees would climb from $26 per credit unit to $36. Chancellor Jack Scott...
Jan 28th, 2011
Mona Vakilifathi | 04:33 PM
In addition to the Tuesday’s release of California’s below-average performance in the sciences on the National Assessment of Educational Progress  (NAEP)  results , as reported by the San Bernardino Sun, there were several updates this week in California education.   The use of the ”parent-trigger law” in the Compton Unified School District has been attracting attention throughout...
Jan 26th, 2011
David N Plank | 11:58 AM | Assessment & Accountability
Bill Tierney and Lisa Garcia have a new article on-line that reviews the findings and implications of their study of Early Assessment Program (EAP) implementation in Los Angeles.  (The study can be found here; for background information click here as well).  Their findings are almost uniformly negative.  The students who participated in their focus groups or responded to their survey know almost nothing about...
| 1
Jan 25th, 2011
Charles Taylor Kerchner | 11:08 PM | Teachers
U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan and a raft of supporters in the foundation world fervently want to replace the tried-and-true teacher salary schedule with pay-for-performance schemes.  They should be careful of what they wish for.   The idea seems straightforward: Replace raises conditioned on years of service and education beyond the minimum required for a teaching license with conspicuous rewards for good...
| 2