This page refers to older operating systems and older network software. Please refer to the "MacStanford Home Page" for details for more modern computers.

MacTCP Manual

©1995 Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University
Section I, MacTCP Error Codes 1995 Eric Behr
Last revised October 2, 1998 by Drew Saunders
The canon URL for the latest version of this document is http://www.stanford.edu/group/networking/NetConsult/MacTCP/

A. About MacTCP
B. Note About Open Transport
C. MacTCP Installation
D. Network Software Installation
E. MacTCP Configuration
F. MacTCP More... Dialog
G. SUNet Connection Types
H. MacTCP Troubleshooting
I. MacTCP Error Codes

A. About MacTCP

Programs such as MacSamson, Fetch, NewsWatcher, and Netscape communicate on the Internet using standard TCP/IP protocols. MacTCP is the control panel that enables your Macintosh to use TCP/IP protocols; without it, you have no access to the Internet.

This software is being provided to you through a site license between Apple Computer and and Stanford University. Please be advised that all use, copying, and distribution of the Apple Software must be in accordance with the terms and conditions of Stanford's license agreement.

This software is for use by Stanford faculty, staff and students, while they are employed or enrolled at Stanford. DO NOT COPY OR DISTRIBUTE THIS SOFTWARE TO OTHERS WHO ARE NOT ELIGIBLE. The agreement allows for use of the software by faculty, staff and students on their home machines. Use of this software is restricted to the continental USA.

By copying this software, you are agreeing that you are using the software according to the terms designated above. To do otherwise is to violate copyright law.

Questions about the terms of the license should be directed to software-licensing@leland.stanford.edu.

B. Note About Open Transport

Open Transport is a more modern suite of network software that Apple has implemented for 68040 and PowerPC Macs, and, if you can, you should be using it. If you have System 7.6 or later, you have Open Transport. If you have Open Transport and a modem, please refer to "Using OT/PPP." If you have Open Transport and an ethernet connection, please refer to "Using Open Transport with Ethernet at Stanford."

C. MacTCP Installation Procedure

1. Open the Network control panel to examine your network software. If you don't have the Network control panel installed, then you must definitely upgrade your network software; see section D, Network Software Installation.

2. Check the AppleTalk version number. It must be at least version 58.0 in order for MacTCP 2.x to work. The control panel below left has version 58.1.5, which is fine. If your Network control panel does not display an AppleTalk version number, like the one below right, then you have AppleTalk version 56 or earlier, which must be upgraded. See section D, Network Software Installation.


3. Double-click the TCP/IP Connection.image file. Disk Copy will open. (For a faster way to deal with Disk Image files, use ShrinkWrap, in the Utilities folder on the Site Licensed AppleShare server in the Stanford AppleTalk zone.)

4. Click the Make a Copy button. Insert a 1.4MB disk (which need not have been formatted beforehand).



6. Quit DiskCopy.

7. Double-click on the Installer icon on the TCP/IP Connection disk. Do not open the TCP/IP Connection script icon; this might open a copy of the Installer program on your local hard drive, which would prevent the installation from working.



8. Click the Install button to install MacTCP with SNMP support.


9. Restart when done.

D. Network Software Installation

0. If your Macintosh runs System 6.0.8 or earlier, you must use NSI 1.4.5, which is located in the "for System 6" folder. NSI 1.5 and later support System 7.0 and later only. Otherwise, the following instructions apply.

1. Download the Network Software Installer (NSI) image file from the Site Licensed server -- either the site-licensed.stanford.edu FTP server, or the Site Licensed AppleShare server in the Stanford AppleTalk zone. At this writing, the file name is "NSI 1.5.1.image."

2. Double-click the TCP/IP Connection.image file. Disk Copy will open. (For a faster way to deal with Disk Image files, use ShrinkWrap, in the Utilities folder on the Site Licensed AppleShare server in the Stanford AppleTalk zone.)

3. Click the Make a Copy button. Insert a 1.4MB disk (which need not have been formatted beforehand).

4. Quit DiskCopy.

5. Double-click on the Installer icon on the Network Software Installer disk. Do not open the Network Software Installer script icon; this might open a copy of the Installer program on your local hard drive, which would prevent the installation from working.

6. Click the Install button to install AppleTalk 58 (or later) and an updated driver for your Ethernet interface, if applicable.

7. Restart when done.

E. MacTCP Configuration

There are four ways to configure MacTCP at Stanford, depending on how you are connected to SUNet. (If you don't know how or if you are connected to SUNet, see section G, SUNet Connection Types.)
1. Via Ethernet
2. Via LocalTalk/PhoneNET
3. Via SLIP dialin
4. Via PPP dialin/Metricom wireless



1. Ethernet. MacTCP is preconfigured for use with Ethernet. However, your connection must be registered in Stanford's network database (NetDB) before it will work. Your Local Network Administrator (LNA) or Resident Computer Coordinator (RCC) is responsible for maintaining your computer's network registration. He or she will need your Hardware Ethernet Address in order to register your connection properly. Here's the easiest way to find it.

1a. Plug into the Ethernet network.
1b. In the Network Control Panel, select EtherTalk.
1c. Open the MacTCP control panel.
1d. Hold down the Option key while clicking on the Ethernet icon. A 12-character Ethernet address should appear.

If this doesn't work for you, see our longer document on Finding Your Ethernet Address.

Note that when connected via Ethernet, you must select the Ethernet icon, not the EtherTalk icon.

2. Via LocalTalk. Simply click on the LocalTalk (Built In) icon to select it. If you move your Macintosh between different AppleTalk zones, you might have to select your zone from the popup menu beneath the LocalTalk icon.

3. Via SLIP dialin. Simply click on the SLIP icon to select it. Note that the SLIP icon will appear as a choice only if you have properly installed the SLIP Extension in the System Folder:Extensions folder. Refer to the MacSLIP documentation for more information.

4. Via PPP dialin or Metricom modem. Click on the PPP icon to select it. Note that the PPP icon will appear as a choice only if you have properly installed the PPP extension in the System Folder:Extensions folder. Refer to the MacPPP documentation for more information.

F. MacTCP More... Dialog

You do not need to and can not alter the settings in the dialog box brought up by clicking the More... button. This is what they should look like. Your IP address and gateway address will be different.


G. SUNet Connection Types

There are four suppported ways of connecting your computer directly to SUNet. Note that a host dialin modem connection without SLIP or PPP software is considered a connection to one host, not SUNet.

1. Ethernet/EtherTalk
2. LocalTalk/PhoneNET
3. SLIP dialin
4. PPP dialin or Metricom wireless

To determine what type of connection you have, open the Network control panel. If you don't have a Network control panel, you should install the latest Network Software Installer; see section D, Network Software Installation.


The top "pane" of the Network Control Panel window displays your AppleTalk connection. If you are directly connected to SUNet, it is either LocalTalk (Built In) or some variation of EtherTalk. No matter what variation of EtherTalk it is, your connection type for purposes of MacTCP is Ethernet, not EtherTalk. Remote Only is part of Apple Remote Access, which is not generally used at Stanford. IPRemote AT allows you to see Stanford AppleTalk zones via a dialup modem connection (SLIP or PPP); see the ARNS documentation that is distributed with MacSLIP.

If you are connected to a SUNet AppleTalk network, you should have a "Current Zone." If you are connected via LocalTalk, the same zone should appear beneath the LocalTalk icon in MacTCP. If you are on an EtherTalk network with multiple zones, you may choose which zone to appear in via a popup menu.

H. MacTCP Troubleshooting

1. If your connection isn't working, look through your System Folder and your System Folder:Preferences folder for files called MacTCP Prep and MacTCP DNR. You might have two Prep files -- one in the root System Folder, and one in Preferences. Throw them all in the Trash.


2. Copy the latest MacTCP control panel to your System Folder. It will be placed in your System Folder:Control Panels folder.

3. Restart your Macintosh.

4. If it still doesn't work, contact your LNA or RCC. Your connection might not be registered properly. Ethernet address "typos" are pretty common.

 

I. MacTCP error codes

from Eric Behr's "MacTCP and related Macintosh software"
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright Eric Behr, Northern Illinois University, Mathematics Department
(behr@math.niu.edu)
This document can be freely redistributed in whole or in part, provided that
this copyright notice is included intact, and that no material profit is
generated from such a transaction.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
The newest release of these notes can be obtained by anonymous ftp to
ftp.math.niu.edu (in the directory /pub/mac/doc), or by gopher to
gopher.math.niu.edu (directory "Help Files/Help For Macintosh Users"), or as
http://www.math.niu.edu/~behr/docs/mactcp.html. The HTML version is usually
updated first and may be more accurate.
Please send all comments and suggestions to behr@math.niu.edu.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Please note: the information in this section is in no way blessed or
authorized by Apple Computer, Inc. It is simply a summary of information
contained in publicly available header files related to MacTCP (those are
Copyright: (C) 1984-1994 by Apple Computer, Inc.) The list is not
necessarily accurate nor up to date.

-23000    bad network configuration
-23001    bad IP configuration error
-23002    missing IP or LAP configuration error
-23003    error in MacTCP load
-23004    error in getting address
-23005    connection is closing
-23006    invalid length (of what??)
-23007    request conflicts with existing connection
-23008    connection does not exist
-23009    insufficient resources to perform request
-23010    invalid stream pointer
-23011    stream already open
-23012    connectionTerminated
-23013    invalidBufPtr
-23014    invalidRDS
-23014    invalidWDS
-23015    openFailed
-23016    commandTimeout
-23017    duplicateSocket

-23032    Packet too large to send w/o fragmenting
-23033    destination not responding
-23035    ICMP echo timed-out
-23036    no memory to send fragmented pkt
-23037    can't route packet off-net

-23041    nameSyntaxErr
-23042    cacheFault *
-23043    noResultProc
-23044    noNameServer
-23045    authNameErr
-23046    noAnsErr
-23047    dnrErr
-23048    outOfMemory