September 22, 2008

IRiSS to Host Directors of Restricted Use Data Centers

On September 22nd and 23rd, Ron Jarmin, Lynn Riggs, and Lucia Foster of the Center for Economic Studies at the Census Bureau, joined by Peter Meyer and Tabatha McNeill of the National Center for Health Statistics, will meet with local researchers at Stanford and other Bay Area locations to discuss access to non-public economic, demographic and health microdata available on at UC Berkeley's California Census Research Data Center (CCRDC) and soon also available at Stanford.

The Census Research Data Center (RDC) network provides a mechanism for researchers who require data that is more extensive or detailed than is publicly available to advance their research. Researchers working at these RDCs examine broad-ranging issues, including trends in inequality and segregation, the effects of power plants on property values, factors influencing employer-sponsored healthcare coverage, and the dynamics of firm and plant entries and exits over the business cycle.

Schedule of Bay Area Presentations

September 22, 2008

12:00-2:00 pm UC Berkeley
Location: Room 608-7 Evans Hall
"Economic Microdata in the RDCs"
Presenters: Ron Jarmin, Lucia Foster and Lynn Riggs, U.S. Bureau of the Census

12:00-2:00 pm UC San Francisco,
Location: Room 263 at the UCSF Laurel Heights campus
"A Healthy Dose of Data: NCHS Restricted-Use Data in the RDCs"
Presenters: Peter Meyer and Tabatha McNeill, National Center for Health Statistics

3:00-5:00 pm UC Berkeley
Location: Helzel Board Room, Haas
"Above the Top-Code and Below the PUMA: Demographic Microdata in the RDCs"
Presenters: Ron Jarmin, Lucia Foster and Lynn Riggs, U.S. Bureau of the Census

3:30-4:30 pm Stanford University
Location: Building 120; Mendenhall Library
"A Healthy Dose of Data: NCHS Restricted-Use Data in the RDCs"
Presenters: Peter Meyer and Tabatha McNeill, National Center for Health Statistics

September 23, 2008

11:00-12:15 pm Stanford University
Location: Building 120; Mendenhall Library
Presenters: Ron Jarmin, Lucia Foster and Lynn Riggs, U.S. Bureau of the Census

12:15-2:00 pm UC Berkeley
Location: Room 114 Morgan Hall
"A Healthy Dose of Data: NCHS Restricted-Use Data in the RDCs"
Presenters: Peter Meyer and Tabatha McNeill, National Center for Health Statistics


About the Presenters

Ron S. Jarmin received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Oregon in 1992. He began his career as an economist at the U.S. Census Bureau’s Center for Economic Studies where he is now the Chief Economist. His responsibilities include managing the Census Bureau’s network of Research Data Centers, a staff of research economists and the Longitudinal Employer Household Dynamics program. He has published papers in the areas of industrial organization, technology and firm performance, electronic business, industrial classification, and urban economics. He has done considerable research on business dynamics including leading the development of the Census Bureau’s Longitudinal Business Database and the new Business Dynamics Statistics Series.

Lynn Riggs has been an economist with the U.S. Bureau of the Census, Center for Economic Studies since 2002 and is currently the Lead RDC Administrator. Dr. Riggs has conducted research related to policy evaluation, health care, education, and social welfare including the effects of policy on consumer and producer incentives to undertake food safety efforts. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 1998 and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2000.

Lucia Foster is the Assistant Division Chief of Research for the Center for Economic Studies. She received her Ph.D. in economics from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1998. While in graduate school, Lucia served as a Special Sworn Status Research Assistant in the Research Data Center Lab at Census Headquarters. After graduation she joined the Census Bureau's Center for Economic Studies. She has published papers in the areas of productivity dynamics, job flows, and wage dispersion.

Peter Meyer is the Director of the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) Research Data Center (RDC). His graduate training is in economics and public health. Prior to coming to the RDC, Peter worked on the National Health Interview Survey and led a research project on economic measurement. He also held a faculty position at the University of Maryland Center on Aging. In an earlier career, Peter spent over ten years working in the intelligence community. This blend of survey, academic, and classified data analysis experience equip him well for the job of providing researchers access to sensitive NCHS data.

Tabatha L. McNeill joined the Research Data Center (RDC) in July 2008. She provides technical assistance to researchers who wish to access non-public use data files. She also assists the RDC director with the daily operations of the Research Data Center. Before coming to NCHS, Ms. McNeill was a Program Associate for Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation. Tabatha has a MPH in Behavioral Science and Health Education.

Sponsors

The California Census Research Data Center
The Nicholas C. Petris Center on Health care Markets and Consumer Welfare
The Center for Health Research
Health Services and Policy Analysis Program, School of Public Health
Department of Economics
The Institute of Business and Economic Research (IBER)
The Haas School of Business
Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies


Questions?

Please contact Jon Stiles (jons@berkeley.edu) if you have questions about the CCRDC or these presentations.

Posted by cthomsen at 01:14 PM

September 11, 2008

REP Researcher Featured in Almanac

A study on the impact avatars can have on behavior, diet and health changes is featured in The Almanac. (9/10/08) The story highlights the work of Jesse Fox, researcher and manager of the Virtual Human Interaction Lab. Some of Fox's studies are conducted at the IRiSS Research Experience Program, in collaboration with Foothill Community College.

To read the full story, see http://www.almanacnews.com/story.php?story_id=6839

Posted by cthomsen at 10:23 AM

September 10, 2008

IRiSS Hosts New NPLS Study

The National Public Life Survey (NPLS) is a research study run by the
University of Michigan and Stanford University, with funding from the
National Science Foundation. In NPLS studies, people from across the
country share their experiences and opinions about a wide range of
important social issues. The information from these studies is used to
answer many questions about how American citizens view their lives.
The users of the data include scores of researchers in universities
and independent research organizations. The data are also used by many
teachers who use the data to help students better understand America
today.

For more information, see the NPLS website at
www.nationalpubliclifestudy.org.

Posted by cthomsen at 11:35 AM

August 25, 2008

Poll Points to Belief that Energy Conservation Won't be Enough

Although Americans are driving less with gas prices topping $4 a gallon, a majority say it's more important to find new energy sources than to improve conservation. This finding was a result of a "green" poll designed by Professor Jon Krosnick, IRiSS faculty leadership member. Read an article about the project in the Stanford Report, or watch a video about the results on abcnews.com.

Posted by tanya at 11:42 AM

July 29, 2008

Experimental Research Program Applications Now Being Accepted for Fall 2008

The Institute for Research in the Social Sciences is pleased to announce that its Research Experience Program (REP) is now accepting applications for Fall 2008. Launched in Fall 2007, REP works jointly with local community colleges to help Stanford faculty and graduate students do experimental social science research by providing access to human participants. Participating in REP gives researchers access to wider subject pools and is also an excellent opportunity for students at local community colleges to earn course credit at their institutions while gaining first-hand exposure to experimental research in the social sciences.

Since its inception, the program has achieved considerable success, growing to more than 20 researchers and a subject pool of about 150-200 students. According to Neil Malhotra, recent Stanford PhD graduate in political science who enters the GSB this fall as an assistant professor, “My REP grant was invaluable in improving the external validity of my research. Most importantly, REP provides researchers with a diverse pool of subjects that are more representative of the national population than traditional undergraduate subject pools. This allowed me not only to produce internally-valid findings via my design, but also results that could say something about human behavior more generally.”

Applications are due Friday August 29, 2008 at 5:00 pm and are available at: http://opinio.stanford.edu/opinio/s?s=957. Other deadlines for application in the 2008-2009 academic year include Friday, October 10, 2008 (for Winter 2009) and Friday, January 16, 2009 (for Spring 2009).

For more information about REP, visit the REP Web site at: rep.stanford.edu. The Stanford community section of the site is password protected, so to access information or if you have questions about the application process or the program itself, please direct them to this email address: research-exp-program@stanford.edu.
.

Posted by tanya at 04:19 PM

June 02, 2008

New Stanford Poverty Count

A new initiative to release a Stanford Poverty Count is being launched by the Stanford Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality. The initiative aims to provide a more accurate measure of poverty in the U.S. by taking into account factors not considered in the current poverty index. The Stanford Poverty Count will more accurately measure which families are poor and whether poverty is increasing or declining.

Posted by tanya at 02:46 PM

May 15, 2008

PACS Center and "The Third Sector" Featured in InterAction

The PACS Center was featured in the Spring 2008 issue of InterAction, Stanford's premier publication featuring multidisciplinary research. The article focuses on the Center's faculty, graduate students, and practioners who are studying "the third sector," and how civil society is slowly supplanting the state.

Posted by tanya at 12:46 PM

April 28, 2008

Is Oil Bad for Democracy?

New reseaerch challenges the widely held theory that democracy and oil exports are inversely related. Visit Stanford's Storybank for details.

Posted by tanya at 05:30 PM

April 07, 2008

Can An Election Hinge on Whose Name Comes First on the Ballot?

Why were the polls so wrong in the January 2008 New Hampshire Democratic primary? Jon Krosnick, professor of communication and associate director of IRiSS, helped solve the mystery. Visit Stanford's Storybank for details.

Posted by tanya at 11:05 AM

March 27, 2008

John F. Sandy Smith appointed as Founding Chairman of IRiSS Advisory Board

The Institute for Research in the Social Sciences (IRiSS) at Stanford University has named John F. Sandy Smith the Founding Chairman of its external advisory board. Smith is a Senior Partner in the Corporate and Securities groups of Morris, Manning & Martin, LLP in Atlanta. His first tasks will include forming the external board, informing the strategic planning efforts and defining fundraising plans for the institute.

"Sandy has already provided excellent guidance on effective program development, organization and planning," says IRiSS Executive Director Chris Thomsen. "He has also been very generous with his contacts by setting up meetings with key leaders at the Carter Center and the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta."

IRiSS, formed in 2004, produces cutting-edge original multi-disciplinary research in the social sciences. Recent conferences have covered topics including racial and gender inequality, theories of justice, philanthropy, infectious diseases, population studies and access to census and health statistics data. IRiSS also houses several research centers, including American National Election Studies, The Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, The Stanford Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality, The Stanford Census Research Data Center and The Methods of Analysis Program in the Social Sciences.

Stanford University President John Hennessy has described IRiSS as a critical, strategic initiative, noting that many of society’s problems are neither purely technical nor medical. “Advancing the desire to transplant democracy to other nations or addressing problems of poverty and discrimination, for example, are questions of social science,” Hennessy has said. “How we respond to global epidemics, or how we think about national health care and national defense also demand answers from the social sciences, in conjunction with engineering, medicine, and law.”

This is not the first time the university has recognized Smith’s achievements. In 2006 he received the Stanford Medal, one of the university’s highest awards, which recognizes a distinguished legacy of leadership. He also served as a Stanford University trustee for several years.

Smith has served on the Board of Trustees of the Paideia School, The National Kidney Foundation of Georgia and Prevent Blindness Georgia. He has also been a member of the President's Council of the Woodruff Arts Center, the Alumni Board of Governors of The Westminster School and served on the MBA Advisory Board of the Amos Tuck School at Dartmouth College.

Smith is a lecturer and an executive in residence at Dartmouth’s Tuck School and the Goizueta Business School at Emory University. He also is a member of the Leadership Atlanta class of 2000.

Posted by tanya at 04:08 PM

February 26, 2008

2008 Summer Institute in Political Psychology

IRiSS is pleased to announce that it is hosting the 2008 Summer Institute in Political Psychology (SIPP) on July 13-August 1,2008. Directed by Stanford Professor Jon Krosnick, SIPP is a three-week intensive training program introducing graduate students and professionals to the world of political psychology scholarship. On-line applications are now being accepted. For information, please visit the SIPP website.

Posted by tanya at 03:58 PM

January 31, 2008

San Francisco Chronicle Features Pathways

The San Francisco Chronicle features Pathways, a new magazine on economic inequality published by the Stanford Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality. The inaugural issue boasts the bylines of Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, and John Edwards. To read more about Pathways and its efforts to wage a "smart" war on poverty, visit the news article.

Posted by cthomsen at 11:45 AM

January 07, 2008

Morrison Institute Announces Its Winter Colloquium Series

The Morrison Institute for Population and Resource Studies Winter Colloquium is a lecture series for students, the Stanford community, and the general public that presents the latest scientific findings in demography, epidemiology, genetics, and other areas in the field of population and resource studies.

The Colloquium is held on Wednesdays, 4:15 p.m. in Herrin Hall T-175 (Biological Sciences building).

Contact Jim Collins, (650)723-7518, or email morrisoninstitute@stanford.edu for more information.

The 2008 schedule:

Wednesday, 9 January
Luisa N. Borrell (Columbia University)
“Race and Hypertension in Hispanics: Is It Social or Genetic?”

Wednesday, 16 January
James Holland Jones (Stanford University)
“New Approaches to Modeling Heterogeneous Mortality”

Wednesday, 23 January
Walter Scheidel (Stanford University)
“Continuity and Change in Human Demography: The Contribution of Ancient History”

Wednesday, 30 January
Evelyne Heyer (Musée de l'homme, Paris)
“Social Behavior and Genetic Diversity in Human Populations”

Wednesday, 6 February
Shripad Tuljapurkar (Stanford University)
“Why Men Matter: Aging and Senescence”

Wednesday, 13 February
Manfred Kayser (Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam)
“Human Genetic History in the Pacific”

Wednesday, 20 February
Ben Kerr (University of Washington)
“The Evolution and Resolution of a 'Tragedy of the Commons' in a Host-Pathogen Metapopulation”

Wednesday, 27 February
Douglas Erwin (National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institute)
“Ecological and Developmental Dimensions of the Cambrian Explosion of Animal Life”

Wednesday, 5 March
Suzanne Romaine (Oxford University)
“Where Have All the Languages Gone? Global Perspectives on Biolinguistic Diversity and the Extinction of the World's Languages”

(http://www.stanford.edu/group/morrinst/c.html)

Posted by cthomsen at 11:11 AM

November 26, 2007

SSHP Researcher Receives Rhodes

Aaron Polhamus, an undergraduate research team member with the Social Science History Program, has been named a Rhodes Scholar. Working with Professor Steve Haber, Polhamus's senior thesis looks at Peru's microfinance banks.

For more information, see the Stanford news story about the Rhodes scholarships at:
http://news-service.stanford.edu/news/2007/november28/rhodes-112807.html

Posted by cthomsen at 10:47 AM

October 29, 2007

Stanford Sociologist included among newly elected AAAS Fellows

As reported by the Stanford News Service. Karen S. Cook, the Ray Lyman Wilbur Professor of Sociology and professor, by courtesy, of education, was elected for her outstanding work on social exchange, networks and trust, including the establishment of one of the first computerized laboratories for the study of exchange. Cook is chair of the Department of Sociology and director of Stanford's Institute for Research in the Social Sciences.

Five Stanford professors were among the 471 newly elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world's largest organization of scientists. Election as a fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. Founded in 1848, AAAS fulfills its mission to "advance science and serve society" through its projects, programs and publications, including the journal Science. The tradition of naming AAAS fellows began in 1874.

Posted by cthomsen at 02:57 PM

October 16, 2007

IRiSS Opens New Subject Pool

This fall IRiSS is piloting a new "Research Experience Program" in collaboration with Foothill College. The program was created to enrich the educational experiences at neighboring community colleges, as well as to improve the quality of Stanford research, particularly experimental research, in the social sciences. The REP brings Stanford researchers onto local community college campuses so that community college students can participate in formal social science research projects. Students enrolled in courses participating in the REP earn course credit by taking part in experiments conducted by Stanford researchers.

IRiSS is now collecting applications to conduct non-medical experimental and survey research projects from Stanford social science researchers. To participate during Winter 2008, an online application is due October 19, 2007 at 5:00 pm.

To participate this Spring quarter, IRB protocol applications are due by latest November 30, 2007, and REP online applications are due January 11, 2008.

The REP welcomes all sorts of non-medical experimental and survey research projects. Medical protocols are not allowed. All studies MUST have current Institutional Review Board (IRB) Authorization in order to participate. Researchers will have to submit a new annual IRB protocol specific to participation in the REP. Amendments to protocols with existing IRB authorization will not be allowed.

For details, go to http://rep.stanford.edu/

Posted by cthomsen at 11:52 AM

September 19, 2007

New Secure Data Center Opens

This fall IRiSS will open a new Secure Data Center to support research that analyzes confidential and sensitive data sets. According to IRiSS director Karen Cook, the center will develop expertise and specialized infrastructure to stay ahead of two trends in the social sciences--one is the demand for access to the growing mass of micro data available to the research community; the other is the heightened concern about the protection of these data.

Sociology Professor Matthew Snipp has been appointed the founding director of the center. Snipp indicates that leading the list of projects to be launched this year is the opening of a Stanford node of the Census Bureau's Research Data Centers, in collaboration with UC Berkeley. In addition to the many data sets from the Census Bureau, the new center will soon also provide access to health microdata from the National Center for Health Statistics. Future initiatives will facilitate access to a variety of data sets with special licensing restrictions and protections.

Snipp's own research uses Census data to understand how factors such as residence, education and family composition are related to racial identification and especially to questions about multiracial backgrounds.

Inquiries about the Secure Data Center should be sent to IRiSS-info@stanford.edu

Posted by cthomsen at 09:53 AM

September 12, 2007

Jackman to head MAPSS

IRiSS Director Karen Cook today announced the appointment of Simon Jackman to direct the Methods of Analysis Program in the Social Sciences. Jackman, professor of political science with a courtesy appointment in statistics, will begin his term immediately. Cook also expressed thanks to professor Jon Krosnick, who has served as MAPSS director since its founding and has successfully launched many new programs that support social science research.

The MAPPS program was founded three years ago with the aim to enhance the quality of empirical research throughout the social sciences. One of the programs earliest contributions was to provide a central database of the methodology courses that are taught across the campus. Other activities include: a) a colloquium series that brings world-class methodologists to campus; b) a graduate certificate in methodology; and, c) training courses to prepare undergraduates to conduct field research, especially for students who have been awarded research grants through the office of the vice provost of undergraduate education and more. For additional information, go to mapss.stanford.edu

Posted by cthomsen at 10:34 PM

August 30, 2007

Concert for Hope celebrates CPI opening

The Stanford Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality presents a CONCERT FOR HOPE in cooperation with IRiSS and the Elfenworks Foundation.

Featuring
La Povertá Composed by Giancarlo Aquilanti
I Shall Not Be Moved and In Harmony With Hope
Arranged and Composed by Tammy L. Hall

Remarks by Richard Saller, School of Humanities and Sciences Dean
and David Grusky, Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality Director

Memorial Church
Main Quad, Stanford University
Thursday, September 6, 2007
7 p.m.
Reception to follow

For more information go to www.stanfordalumni.org
Tickets are free and available at the Stanford Ticket Office
659-725-ARTS(2787) or at the door.
Donations to the Center will be gratefully accepted.
For questions contact Andrea Lazazzera at (650)736-9700

Co-sponsored by The Elfenworks Foundation,
the Stanford Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality,
the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences at Stanford University,
and the Stanford Office for Religious life

Posted by cthomsen at 03:24 PM

May 29, 2007

Seminar Focuses on Spatial Methodologies

"The Impact of the American Civil War on Post-War Marriage and Subsequent Widowhood" will be presented by two of the papers three authors -- Stanford Anthropologist James Holland Jones and San Jose State Historian Libra Hilde -- at noon on Thursday, May 31. This cross-disciplinary analysis with a focus on spatial methodologies is presented as a part of the new Geographic Information Systems Special Interest Group. Location of the event is the Stanford Humanities Center.


An abstract for the paper and additional program information is available at:
http://gissig.stanford.edu/?p=53

Posted by cthomsen at 02:34 PM

May 02, 2007

NAS Elects Two Stanford Social Scientists

The National Academy of Sciences announced the election of 72 new members on May 1, in recognition of "their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. This years cohort includes Stanford Political Science Professor David Laitin, and Sociology Professor (and IRiSS Director) Karen Cook.

As described in the NAS news release, the Academy was established in 1863 by a congressional act of incorporation signed by Abraham Lincoln that calls on the Academy to act as an official advisor to the federal government, upon request, in any matter of science or technology.

Election to the Academy is considered one of the highest honors bestowed upon scientists and engineers. There are 2,025 active members, of whom more than 200 have won Nobel Prizes.

Posted by cthomsen at 01:37 PM

April 19, 2007

Do Surveys and Censuses Still Serve the Common Good?

A symposium, open to the public, will feature a conversation between noted survey and census scholars Kenneth Prewitt and Henry Brady on Monday, April 30, 2007 from 4-6pm. Prewitt is the Carnegie Professor of Public Affairs at Columbia University and a former director of the U.S. Census Bureau. Brady is the Class of 1941 Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at UC Berkeley. Stanford Political Science Professor Douglas Rivers will serve as the moderator. Location is the Jonsson Social Sciences Reading Room in the Green Library. The symposium is co-sponsored by IRiSS and the Social Sciences Resource Center of the Stanford University Libraries.

The flyer for the symposium can be downloaded at:
IRiSS Symposium

To reserve a seat or get additional information, please contact
IRiSS-info@Stanford.edu
or call (650) 724-5221

Posted by cthomsen at 01:50 PM

April 18, 2007

PhD Fellowship Applications Invited by the PACS Center

The Stanford Center for Research on Philanthropy and Civil Society seeks to increase and enhance research on philanthropy and civil society. We also seek to apply analyses of these activities and institutions speak to core research questions in the social sciences, as well as the professional schools. To pursue these goals, the Center offers PhD fellowships, support for undergraduates writing honor’s theses, and supports PhD seminars and workshops. The Center is located administratively in the Institute for Research on the Social Sciences, and physically in the Haas Center for Public Service.

Eligibility: Second year PhD students and beyond, pre-or post-dissertation proposal stage, are eligible. Students will be expected to begin the year with a well-defined research project to carry out during their fellowship year. We welcome proposals from the social sciences, the humanities, and professional schools.

Research Topics: The Center encourages applications from students studying the leading institutions and activities that are defining civil society, particularly the interaction between funding sources, nonprofit and nongovernmental organizations. Students may explore a range of themes dealing with comparative institutional analysis (the assessment of alternative arrangements - be they public, private, and nonprofit – for the provision of a service or good); the effects of different forms of financial support on the ability of nonprofit or nongovernmental organizations to effectively work with communities; and the role of nongovernmental organizations in non-Western nations. Possible topics might include, but are not limited to:

• The efficacy of philanthropy - - in contrast to the market or the state - - in responding to crises, such as famine, natural disasters, or civil wars;
• The role of civil society organizations in political advocacy and policy making, and their consequences for democratic governance;
• The role of new technologies in facilitating forms of civic participation in either the developed or developing world;
• The effects of intermediary organizations (consulting firms, advocacy groups, international donors) on both funders and nonprofit organizations;
• The effects of funder priorities on the activities and direction of nonprofit and public institutions.

Funding and Expectations: The fellowship would provide up to a full year of support - - stipend and tuition, and health insurance - - for PhD students. We anticipate that we will offer three or four fellowships in 2007-08. Please note the fellowship does not support travel or data collection.

All recipients are expected to participate in a year-long research workshop that meets on Friday afternoons (2-4:30) every other week throughout the school year. The seminar will be open to PhD students from all over campus, in addition to fellowship recipients, undergraduate seniors writing honor’s theses, faculty, and visiting scholars. Fellowship recipients will be expected to complete a writing project during their fellowship year, and required to turn that work into scholarly articles for academic journals within two years of receipt of the fellowship.

Application Process: The application form may be downloaded at: http://www.stanford.edu/group/iriss/philancivilsociety/PACSFellowships.doc

The deadline for application is June 15, 2007. Notification will be made in mid-July.

Faculty Steering Committee of the Center:

• Steve Barley, Management Science and Engineering
• Larry Diamond, Institute for International Studies and Hoover Institute
• Doug McAdam, Sociology and Urban Studies
• Debra Meyerson, School of Education, and Graduate School of Business, co-director
• Milbrey McLaughlin, School of Education
• Leonard Ortolano, Civil Engineering
• Walter W. Powell, School of Education, and (by courtesy) Sociology, Graduate School of Business, School of Engineering, and Communication, co-director
• Rob Reich, Political Science
• Bruce Seivers, the Haas Center

Posted by cthomsen at 10:28 AM

April 10, 2007

Race, Inequality and Incarceration Summit

On Wednesday, April 11, IRiSS will co-host a summit addressing the causes, meanings, and effects of racial disproportion in the American criminal justice system with a focus on massive incarceration and racial disproportion in American prisons and jails.

Panelists include: Stanford Law Professor Robert Weisberg, director of the Criminal Justice Center; Stanford Professor of Sociology Lawrence Bobo; Stanford Associate Professor of Psychology Jennifer Eberhardt; and Theodore M. Shaw, director-counsel and president of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

To see the full agenda and to register for the conference, go to:

http://www.stanford.edu/group/iriss/conferences/rii.html

Posted by cthomsen at 03:05 PM

February 27, 2007

National Center for Health Statistics

Data sets available from the National Center for Health Statistics include:

National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I, II, and III
National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey
National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey
National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery
National Hospital Discharge Survey
National Nursing Home Survey
National Home and Hospice Care Survey
National Employer Health Insurance Survey
National Health Provider Inventory
National Health Interview Survey 1967-2005
National Immunization Survey
Longitudinal Study on Aging
National Survey of Family Growth
State and Local Area Integrated Telephone Survey
a. Health
b. Child Well-Being and Welfare, 1997
c. National Survey of Early Childhood Health
d. National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs
e. National Survey of Children's Health
f. National Asthma Survey
g. National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs
Vital Statistics
a. Birth
b. Mortality
c. Marriages and Divorces
d. Fetal Death
e. National Death Index

Linked Data
National Health Interview Survey with Mortality data 1986-2000
National Health Interview Survey with Medicare Enrollment and Claims data
1991-2000
National Health Interview Survey with Social Security Administration
Retirement, Survivors, and Disability Insurance data 1962-2003
National Health Interview Survey with Social Security Administration
Supplemental Security Income data 1974-2003
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I Epidemiologic Follow-up
Study with Mortality data 1971-2000
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I with Medicare Enrollment
and Claims data 1991-2000
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I with Social Security
Administration Retirement, Survivors, and Disability Insurance data
1962-2003
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I with Social Security
Administration Supplemental Security Income data 1974-2003
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey II with Mortality data
1976-2000
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey II with Medicare
utilization and expenditure data 1991-2000
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III with Mortality data
1988-2000
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III with Medicare
Enrollment and Claims data (CMS-1991-2000)
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III with Social Security
Administration Retirement, Survivors, and Disability Insurance data
1974-2003
National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III with Social Security
Administration Supplemental Security Income data 1974-2003
Longitudinal Study of Aging II with Mortality data 1994-2002
Longitudinal Study of Aging II with Medicare Enrollment and Claims data
1991-2000
Longitudinal Study of Aging II with Social Security Administration
Retirement, Survivors, and Disability Insurance data 1962-2003
Longitudinal Study of Aging II with Social Security Administration
Supplemental Security Income data 1974-2003
1985 National Nursing Home Survey with Mortality data 1985-2002
1985 National Nursing Home Survey with Social Security Administration
Retirement, Survivors, and Disability Insurance data 1962-2003
1985 National Nursing Home Survey with Social Security Administration
Supplemental Security Income data 1974-2003

Posted by cthomsen at 03:10 PM

February 26, 2007

Census and Health Statistics Data Sets

Faculty and graduate students with an interest in research using data at the U.S. Census Bureau and the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) are invited to participate in a presentation introducing the new data center to be opened by IRiSS. Stanford Professor Matt Snipp will be joined by UC Berkeley Professor Henry Brady, who is director of the California Census Research Data Center, and Andrew Hildreth, director of research at the Berkeley center. Snipp is on the board of scientific counselors for the NCHS and advisory committee for the Census Bureau. An overview of the kinds of confidential microdata available to the research community will be presented.

Sessions will be held on March 19 and 20. Contact IRiSS-info@stanford.edu for details.

For details please contact IRiSS-info@stanford.edu

Posted by cthomsen at 10:41 AM

January 08, 2007

Web-based Survey Authoring and Deployment App Available

IRISS is pleased to offer a new service to Stanford social science researchers allowing the construction and deployment of online surveys on in-house servers. The software, Opinio from ObjectPlanet, allows for managed personalized invitation lists, unlimited question designs, multimedia and internationalization support, and online reporting of results all from a web browser anywhere on the Internet. More info can be found at http://www.stanford.edu/group/iriss/resources/.

Posted by vijoy at 04:22 PM

Morrison Announces New Colloquium

The Morrison Institute Winter Colloquium on Population Studies will begin on Wednesday, January 10, 2007. Location is Herrin Hall T-175, each Wednesday at 4:15. One-unit credit is available for BioSci 146 or HumBio 60.

Contact Jim Collins, (650)723-7518, or email morrisoninstitute@stanford.edu for more information.

The 2007 Colloquium schedule features:

10 Jan. James R. Carey (University of California, Davis)

"Survival and Aging in the Wild Via Residual Demography"

17 Jan. Steve Lansing (University of Arizona and Santa Fe Institute)

"Village Assembly, Language Speciation, and the Neutral Theory in Indonesia"

24 Jan. Richard Bribiescas (Yale University)

"On the Evolution of Human Male Reproductive Senescence: Is There a Male Menopause?"

31 Jan. Laura Carstensen (Stanford University)

"Living Long or Growing Old: Take Your Pick"

7 Feb. Peter Small (The Gates Foundation), Anne Stone (Arizona State University), and Sebastien Gagneux (Institute for Systems Biology)

"What Ancient and Modern DNA Tells Us About the Evolution of M Tuberculosis"

14 Feb. Daniel Promislow (University of Georgia)

"Fifty Years after G. C. Williams: Is There Still a Place for Evolutionary Genetics in the Study of Senescence?"

21 Feb. David Goldstein (Duke University)

"Neuropsychiatric Genetics: Where Are We Headed?"

28 Feb. David Krakauer and Jessica Flack (Santa Fe Institute)

"Competitive and Social Niche Construction"

7 Mar. Robert Mare (University of California at Los Angeles)

"Income Inequality and Educational Assortative Mating"

Posted by cthomsen at 12:27 PM

December 16, 2006

IRiSS hosts international conference

Infectious Disease and Demography is the topic of a upcoming IRiSS conference that has been chosen to be highlighted in Applera Foundation's international lecture series. The one-day program, scheduled for Friday, February 23, will focus on HIV/AIDs, tuberculosis, and malaria. The event is free and open to the public, though registration is required.

More information is available at: http://appliedbiosystems.coverallcrew.com/sls/usancalifornia/.

Posted by cthomsen at 07:08 AM

November 06, 2006

Fairness and Accountability in US Elections

"In the Voting Booth, Bias Starts at the Top" was the lead for an op-ed piece in the New York Times this Saturday, written by IRiSS Associate Director Jon Krosnick.

Professor Krosnick writes, "People who are first in line at a movie know they have the best chance of getting the seats they want. When students answer multiple-choice questions incorrectly, they usually choose one of the first options offered. When people taste-test four brands of beer, they tend to prefer the one they try first.

And so it is with voting. Candidates listed first on the ballot get about two percentage points more votes on average than they would have if they had been listed later (flipping a 49 to 51 defeat into a 51 to 49 victory). In fact, in about half the races I have studied, the advantage of first place is even bigger — certainly big enough to win some elections these days.

When do voters gravitate to the first name they see? Based on the more than 100 elections in Ohio that a colleague and I studied, it’s when voters know little or nothing about the candidates, or when the candidates’ party affiliations are not listed on the ballot, or when the incumbent (whom voters typically know at least somewhat) is not running for re-election. Thus, some voters apparently feel an obligation or desire to vote even when they have no basis for choosing a candidate and are drawn to the first name they read.

But even in well-publicized major national races, being listed first can help. Some people walk into the voting booth feeling ambivalent, and in the end just grab the name on top so they can get out of the booth.

How do we know this? Well, consider this: In California’s 80 Assembly districts, candidate name order is randomly assigned. In 1996, Bill Clinton’s vote tally was 4 percentage points higher in the Assembly districts where he was listed first than in the ones where he was listed last — a difference that persisted even after we took into account pre-existing Democratic registration levels in the districts.

In 2000, George W. Bush’s vote tally was 9 percentage points higher in the districts where he was listed first than in the districts where he was listed last — again, persisting with registration taken into account.

Of course, these issues are not confined to California. My research team spent a year reading statutes and contacting secretaries of state and county boards of elections to learn about their naming procedures. We found an array of idiosyncratic — and disturbing — rules governing the placement of names on the ballot.

In Florida, for instance, candidates from the governor’s party get top billing, which is why in 2000 and 2004 George W. Bush was listed first on every ballot. (His brother, Jeb, was governor.) In Delaware and Tennessee, by contrast, Democrats always come first.

Some states — like Alabama and North Carolina — list candidates alphabetically by party (meaning that Democrats always precede Republicans); others, like Hawaii and Vermont, list candidates alphabetically by name. Massachusetts always puts incumbents first; others simply allow elections officials to list names in whatever order they please. (Surprise: research by Robert Darcy of Oklahoma State University shows that when given the choice, election officials tend to list their own party’s candidates first.)

Perhaps the most endearing procedure is in Minnesota, where candidates from the party that received the fewest votes in the most recent election are listed first.

Thankfully, the question of bias and name placement on ballots is finally beginning to get the attention it deserves. In August, the Supreme Court of New Hampshire declared unconstitutional the state’s procedure for listing first the names of candidates whose party had received the most votes in the preceding state general election.

Other states should solve this problem — particularly because an effective technique for name placement exists.

Ohio uses a system that is the model of fairness and accountability. Candidate names are rotated from precinct to precinct, so every candidate is listed first an equal number of times, and observers can inspect ballots on Election Day to be sure the rotation was done properly. Idaho, North Dakota, Wyoming and a few other states use versions of this system.

That’s not to say that Ohio executes this system perfectly. For example, in 2004, with the permission of Secretary of State Kenneth Blackwell, a Republican, many Ohio counties ignored the rotation law and listed John Kerry last twice as often as the law allowed. And also with Mr. Blackwell’s approval, Mahoning County’s touch-screen voting machines supposedly rotated candidate name order from voter to voter.

For too long, the placement of names on ballots has been in the shadows. In fact, the government commissions formed since 2000 to improve election procedures barely mention candidate name order. And while it’s too late to do anything about name placement for Tuesday’s elections, we can eliminate this brand of bias in the 2008 elections.

We should acknowledge the wisdom of the New Hampshire Supreme Court and adopt the rotating name-ordering procedures throughout the country. When it comes to our ballots, and our elections, integrity has to come first on the list."

Posted by cthomsen at 09:18 AM

September 22, 2006

Center Awards New Fellowships

Four Stanford graduate students received the first fellowship awards from the Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society. Professor Debra Meyerson and Woody Powell, co-directors of the center, announced the awards, made possible by a grant from the Hewlett Foundation. The recipients are:

Eduardo Bruera, Political Science
Topic: To examine whether the presence and efforts of domestic AIDS-advocacy NGOs and their relative access to material resources leads to more effective implementation of government programs across districts in South Africa.

Tricia Martin, School of Education
Topic: Networking Our Way to Education for All: Knowledge Exchanges Among Education Organizations in International Development from 1945 - 2000

Rand Quinn, School of Education
Topic: Philanthropy, Public School Reform, and Accountability - comparative study of three California school districts that receive funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to redesign their high schools into small learning communities.

Nicholas Switanek, Organizational Behavior-Graduate School of Business
Topic: Impact of foundations on competition and cooperation among environmental social movement organizations, and on the ideological development of those organizations.

The fellowships are aimed to increase research on philanthropy and civil society, while applying analyses of these activities to core research questions in the social sciences as well as in the professional schools.

Posted by cthomsen at 01:37 PM

New Approach to Population Studies

Workshop brings tools of demography to other disciplines for problem solving. The program, co-sponsored by IRiSS, is ushering in a new approach to studying populations—one that engages researchers from multiple disciplines, including anthropology, biology, economics and sociology. The goal is to encourage the use of demographic tools to solve some of today's complex challenges, such as the demographic impact of the AIDS epidemic, population aging and the possible extinction of some species.

See the complete story at: http://news-service.stanford.edu/news/2006/august23/demography-082306.html

Posted by cthomsen at 01:02 PM

September 20, 2006

$2 Million NSF Grant to Overhaul Survey Methodology

Stanford's home page this week highlighted the work of IRiSS Associate Director Jon Krosnick. As published in the Stanford Report, "Armed with a new $2 million grant from the National Science Foundation's Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) Program, Jon Krosnick plans to introduce sweeping changes in traditional survey methodology. If his project is successful, the findings will allow representative sample surveys to obtain accurate, high response rates with quick turnaround times at reasonable costs."

Text of the full article is available at:
http://news-service.stanford.edu/news/2006/september27/krosnick-092706.html

Posted by cthomsen at 03:56 PM

August 25, 2006

Call for Papers

Unfree labor, indentured labor, forced labor and slavery are the focus of a conference to be held December 14-16, 2006 in Berlin. The conference, "Global Labor History and the Question of Freedom/Unfreedom" intends to raise questions involving: immobility and personal dependence as an indicator of unfree labor; the important role of human rights; local studies and comparisons on the significance of the work force as human capital; and the question of to what extent forced labor and the recruitment of migrants into work structures is associated with individual dependence from the employer.

The conference is organized jointly between Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin and the Wissenschaftszentrum für Sozialforschung Berlin (WZB) under the direction of Professor Jürgen Kocka (WZB) and Professor Andreas Eckert (Universität Hamburg.)

For additional information, including details on the Call for Papers, see http://www.wiko-berlin.de/kolleg/projekte/wegedw/?hpl=2

Posted by cthomsen at 11:19 AM

August 18, 2006

American Journal of Sociology announces the 2006 Gould Prize winner

The editors of the American Journal of Sociology announced last month that Michael J. Rosenfeld (Dept of Sociology) is the recipient of the third annual Roger V. Gould Prize for the article "A Critique of Exchange Theory in Mate Selection". Named in honor of the late Roger V. Gould, who served as editor of AJS from 1997 to 2000, the award recognizes the best work published over a two-year period in the journal.

Rosenfeld is Associate Professor of Sociology at Stanford University. He received a bachelor's degree in Mathematics from Brown University and a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Chicago. His book, The Age of Independence: Interracial Unions, Same-Sex Unions and the Changing American Family, is forthcoming in 2007 from Harvard University Press.

In honor of the award, the University of Chicago Press has temporarily lifted access control to the article "A Critique of Exchange Theory in Mate Selection", Vol. 110 (March 2005): 1284-1325. All visitors to the University of Chicago Press Web site will be able to read the full-text version of the award-winning scholarship at:

http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/AJS/journal/issues/v110n5/080319/080319.html

The award, which carries a cash prize of $1,000, was formally presented at the AJS luncheon at the 101st annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, August 11-14, 2006.

Posted by vijoy at 02:36 PM

July 05, 2006

New Graduate Fellowship Program

The Stanford Center for Research on Philanthropy and Civil Society seeks to increase and enhance research on philanthropy and civil society. We also seek to apply analyses of these activities and institutions to core research questions in the social sciences, as well as in the professional schools. To pursue these goals, the Center will offer PhD fellowships, support for undergraduates writing honor’s theses, faculty research support, and doctoral seminars. The Center is located administratively in the Institute for Research on the Social Sciences and physically in the Haas Center for Public Service.

Eligibility: Second year PhD students and beyond, pre-or post-dissertation proposal stage are eligible. Students will be expected to begin the year with a well-defined research project to carry out during their fellowship year. We welcome proposals from the humanities, social sciences, the sciences, and the professional schools.

Research Topics: The Center encourages applications from students studying the leading institutions and activities that are defining civil society, particularly the interaction between funding sources, nonprofit and nongovernmental organizations. Students may explore a range of themes dealing with comparative institutional analysis (the assessment of alternative arrangements - be they public, private, and nonprofit – for the provision of a service or good); the effects of different forms of financial support on the ability of nonprofit or nongovernmental organizations to effectively work with communities; and, as mentioned above, analyses of the lead institutions and processes that define and influence civil society. Possible topics might include, but are not limited to:

* The role of new media technologies in facilitating forms of civic participation in either the developed or developing world;
* The effects of intermediary organizations (consulting firms, advocacy groups, international donors) on both funders and nonprofit organizations;
* The effects of funder priorities on the activities and direction of nonprofit and public institutions, including schools, community agencies, and government services.

Funding and Expectations: The fellowship would provide up to a full year of support - - stipend and tuition, and health insurance - - for PhD students. In our inaugural year, we will award three fellowships. In future years, the number will increase.

All recipients will be required to participate in a year-long research workshop that meets on Friday afternoons (2-4:30) every other week throughout the school year. The seminar will be open to PhD students from all over campus, in addition to fellowship recipients, undergraduate seniors writing honor’s theses, faculty, and visiting scholars. Fellowship recipients will be expected to complete a writing project during their fellowship year and required to turn that work into scholarly articles for academic journals within two years of receipt of the fellowship. Students also will be encouraged to disseminate their research findings to non-scholarly audiences, particularly in the case of work with direct implications for social sector practice.

Application Process: The form below describes the process in detail. The deadline for application is August 1, 2006. Notification will be made on or before August 31, 2006.

Faculty Steering Committee of the Center:

* Steve Barley, Management Science and Engineering
* Larry Diamond, Freeman-Spogli Institute for International Studies and Hoover Institution
* Joanne Martin, Graduate School of Business
* Doug McAdam, Sociology and Urban Studies
* Debra Meyerson, School of Education and Graduate School of Business, co-director
* Milbrey McLaughlin, School of Education
* Leonard Ortolano, Civil and Environmental Engineering
* Walter W. Powell, School of Education, and (by courtesy) Sociology, Graduate School of Business, and Communication, co-director
* Rob Reich, Political Science and Ethics and Society
* Bruce Seivers, Haas Center for Public Service Visiting Scholar

CENTER FOR RESEARCH ON PHILANTHROPY AND CIVIL SOCIETY

STANFORD UNIVERSITY
2006-2007 FELLOWSHIP APPLICATION FORM

IMPORTANT:

A. Send: one original and one copy (no staples please.)
B. On each page of your application print or type your last name, first name and page number. (Each document should be numbered separately.) Place this information at least _ inch from the top and right margins.

Please arrange each copy of your application in this order:

1. Completed application form.
2. Curriculum vitae.
3. Up to 5-page description of research project.
4. Graduate school transcript.
5. Two letters of recommendation from faculty advisors. (Please ask your recommenders to put your name at the top of all pages.

MAIL TO:
Lauren Wechsler
Haas Center for Public Service
Stanford University
562 Salvatierra Walk
Stanford, CA 94305-8620

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF ALL APPLICATION MATERIALS IS AUGUST 1, 2006.

If possible, your complete fellowship application received at this office in a single mailing is appreciated. This cannot be an excuse for a late application.


Posted by cthomsen at 10:42 PM

June 19, 2006

Trustee Presentations Highlight Work of Bobo, Haber, and Krosnick

IRiSS director Karen Cook outlined the Institutes objectives at the June 14 meeting of the Stanford board of trustees. She was joined by Professors Larry Bobo, Steve Haber and Jon Krosnick, who shared research findings relevant to addressing issues of incarceration, immigration and global warming.

Slides from the presentations can be viewed at:
http://www.stanford.edu/group/iriss/ppt/IRiSS.6.14.06.ppt.html

Posted by cthomsen at 04:59 PM

Inequality Debates Posted on Stanford iTunes

Download debates from the spring quarter Inequality debate series, hosted by the Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality. The first program, addressing issues of income inequality, is now available. Subsequent talks on race, politics and gender will soon be posted.

http://itunes.stanford.edu
Look under the header of “Heard on Campus” Choose the tab for “Visiting Lecturers and Speeches”

Posted by cthomsen at 04:45 PM

May 19, 2006

Expanded Access to U.S. Census Microdata

Ritch Milby, Administrator and Demographer from the California Census Research Data Center, will be visiting at IRiSS from June through September, meeting with faculty to discuss access to microdata available to the academic research community. Faculty who would like individual appointments or to attend a one-hour workshop should send email to: cthomsen@Stanford.edu

IRiSS is exploring the opportunity to open a regional data center at Stanford.

Posted by cthomsen at 04:03 PM

Social Science Highlights Featured in the H&S Annual Report

The recently released annual report from the School of Humanities and Sciences features an impressive selection of highlights from the social science research community-- literally an "A" to "Z" listing of faculty awards and accomplishments.

The report also chronicles the startup of IRiSS. Under the heading of "New Institute Tackles Society’s Toughest Issues", the publication features three of the first research initiatives at the Institute. Electronic copies of the annual report are available at:

http://humsci.Stanford.edu/about/facts.html

Posted by cthomsen at 04:02 PM

Last Debate in CPI Inequality Series

Tuesday, May 30 at 2:15 p.m.

"Gender Inequality: Where Are We Going and What is to be Done?" is the topic of the last program in the Inequality Debate series. Professors Trond Peterson (UC Berkeley) and Cecilia Ridgeway (Stanford) will tackle questions such as "What is the likely future of gender inequality?" and "What types of social policy should be devised to increase gender equality." The program, organized by the Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality (CPI), is open to the public.

Location is Room 201 in the Hewlett Teaching Center.

Posted by cthomsen at 03:56 PM

May 01, 2006

Larry Bobo elected to academy of arts and sciences

Lawrence D. Bobo, the Martin Luther King Jr. Centennial Professor, is an authority on race, ethnicity and social inequality. A professor of sociology, Bobo joined the Stanford faculty from Harvard University in 2005. He directs the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity and the Program in African and African American Studies, and is currently conducting a study of race, crime and public opinion in the United States.

Bobo is a founding editor of the Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race, co-author of Racial Attitudes in America: Trends and Interpretations (1997), senior editor of Prismatic Metropolis: Inequality in Los Angeles (2000) and co-editor of Racialized Politics: The Debate on Racism in America (2000). Bobo was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2004. He earned a doctorate in sociology at the University of Michigan in 1984.

Eight scholars elected to academy of arts and sciences

Posted by vijoy at 01:02 PM

March 17, 2006

Controversies about Inequality

A debate and discussion series from the Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality at IRiSS kicks off this spring quarter. Four sessions, examining issues of inequality and income, race, politics and gender, will be led by an acclaimed lineup of scholars. The series is open to the public.

Cornell Economics Professor Robert Frank and Princeton Sociology Professor Bruce Western are featured for the first program on Income Inequality on Thursday, April 13.

Race and Inequality will be the focus for Harvard Sociology Professor Mary Waters and U.C. Santa Barbara Sociology Professor Howard Winant on Tuesday, May 2.

Stanford Political Science Professor John Ferejohn and Northwestern Sociology Professor Jeff Manza will address issues of Politics and Inequality on Tuesday, May 16

Gender and Inequality will be the topic of discussion for U.C. Berkeley Sociology Professor Trond Peterson and Stanford Sociology Professor Cecilia Ridgeway.

All programs begin at 2:15 p.m. and end at 3:30 p.m. Location is the Hewlett Teaching Center, 201.

For additional information, please contact afrooz@stanford.edu

Download Poster (PDF, 3.8MB)

Posted by cthomsen at 01:42 PM

October 17, 2005

NSF awards $7.6 million for the American National Election Studies

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded $7.6 million to fund the American National Election Studies (ANES) to study the causes of voter participation and candidate choice in the 2008 U.S. presidential election. This award represents a dramatic increase in NSF's funding for the project, more than doubling the financial support it received during 2002-2005.

The ANES was created by the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research (ISR) in 1952 and has conducted gold-standard national surveys every two years since then to equip scholars around the world to study American voting behavior and election outcomes. Thousands of books, journal articles, book chapters, and conference presentations have been based upon ANES data during the last five decades.

2006 will mark the first time that the project will be co-directed by the ISR and a partner, Stanford University’s Institute for Research in the Social Sciences (IRiSS).

The substantial increase in funding for the project is the result of two years of advisory workshops held by NSF to evaluate the study’s scientific value and innovative directions for its future.

"This award allows us to conduct the project in much bigger and better ways than has ever been possible," said Arthur Lupia, a professor of political science at the University of Michigan and a principal investigator of the project. "We are excited to have Stanford at the helm of the study with us, bringing valuable new expertise in survey design and measurement."

"NSF's ringing endorsement of the project is a wonderful recognition of 50 years of important scholarship by hundreds of social scientists studying elections and will equip them superbly to continue this important work," said Jon Krosnick, the other principal investigator of the project and a Stanford professor of political science, psychology, and communication.

The centerpiece of the 2005-2009 study will be state-of-the-art hour-long interviews with thousands of Americans face-to-face in their homes both before and again after the November, 2008, election. The questionnaires will ask hundreds of questions of respondents, measuring their opinions on a wide array of political issues, their assessments of the health of the nation, their hopes for government action in the future, their perceptions of the candidates and their platforms, their behavioral participation in the campaign and in politics more generally, and much more. Many of these questions have been asked identically every two years since the 1950s, allowing scholars to track changes in the American electorate over time.

In addition, a nationally representative sample of American adults will be recruited during 2007 and will answer questions once a month for 21 consecutive months, continuing well after the presidential inauguration in 2009. This will allow researchers to study which citizens change their candidate preferences when and why during the primaries and general election campaigns and how citizens react to the election outcome after the nation’s new leader begins to govern.

A third component of the new project will be collaboration with another long-term national survey project, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, run by the Ohio State University’s Center for Human Resource Research. As a result, questions measuring political opinions and behavior will be asked of a representative sample of thousands of young adults every two years, illuminating patterns of long-term change of individuals across elections.

The November, 2008, pre-election and post-election face-to-face interviews will employ innovative new measurement techniques for the first time in the ANES, such as using laptop computers to display questions and answer choices confidentially to respondents and allowing them to answer secretly. In addition, for the first time, the computers will show respondents election-related photographs and videos to enhance measurement of what voters learn during the campaign.

The computers will also measure the speed with which respondents make judgments, using the latest techniques from social and cognitive psychology. This will entail the use of measurement tools that have been used extensively in laboratories around the world but have rarely been administered in surveys of representative national samples of adults.

Response speed measurement is one way to elucidate automatic processes that occur unconsciously in the brain and guide political thinking and action. "By combining self-reports that measure opinions and measurements of response speed, we can better understand the impact of sensitive attitudes, including prejudice and stereotyping." explained Lupia.

2006 will mark a substantial expansion of the number of academic disciplines that will influence and be served by the ANES. The Board of Overseers will double in size to include 20 world-renowned professors from political science, psychology, sociology, economics, and communication.

During the coming years, substantial efforts will be mounted to encourage scholars from all of these disciplines and others as well to submit proposals about how the study should be designed and what questions should be asked of the survey respondents.

* * * * *

Contacts:

Jon Krosnick, 650-851-9143

Arthur Lupia, 734-647-7549

NES Homepage: http://www.electionstudies.org/

ISR: http://www.isr.umich.edu/

Stanford IRiSS: http://iriss.stanford.edu/

Posted by vijoy at 04:31 PM | Comments (0)