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September 22, 2008

IRiSS to Host Directors of Restricted Use Data Centers

On September 22nd and 23rd, Ron Jarmin, Lynn Riggs, and Lucia Foster of the Center for Economic Studies at the Census Bureau, joined by Peter Meyer and Tabatha McNeill of the National Center for Health Statistics, will meet with local researchers at Stanford and other Bay Area locations to discuss access to non-public economic, demographic and health microdata available on at UC Berkeley's California Census Research Data Center (CCRDC) and soon also available at Stanford.

The Census Research Data Center (RDC) network provides a mechanism for researchers who require data that is more extensive or detailed than is publicly available to advance their research. Researchers working at these RDCs examine broad-ranging issues, including trends in inequality and segregation, the effects of power plants on property values, factors influencing employer-sponsored healthcare coverage, and the dynamics of firm and plant entries and exits over the business cycle.

Schedule of Bay Area Presentations

September 22, 2008

12:00-2:00 pm UC Berkeley
Location: Room 608-7 Evans Hall
"Economic Microdata in the RDCs"
Presenters: Ron Jarmin, Lucia Foster and Lynn Riggs, U.S. Bureau of the Census

12:00-2:00 pm UC San Francisco,
Location: Room 263 at the UCSF Laurel Heights campus
"A Healthy Dose of Data: NCHS Restricted-Use Data in the RDCs"
Presenters: Peter Meyer and Tabatha McNeill, National Center for Health Statistics

3:00-5:00 pm UC Berkeley
Location: Helzel Board Room, Haas
"Above the Top-Code and Below the PUMA: Demographic Microdata in the RDCs"
Presenters: Ron Jarmin, Lucia Foster and Lynn Riggs, U.S. Bureau of the Census

3:30-4:30 pm Stanford University
Location: Building 120; Mendenhall Library
"A Healthy Dose of Data: NCHS Restricted-Use Data in the RDCs"
Presenters: Peter Meyer and Tabatha McNeill, National Center for Health Statistics

September 23, 2008

11:00-12:15 pm Stanford University
Location: Building 120; Mendenhall Library
Presenters: Ron Jarmin, Lucia Foster and Lynn Riggs, U.S. Bureau of the Census

12:15-2:00 pm UC Berkeley
Location: Room 114 Morgan Hall
"A Healthy Dose of Data: NCHS Restricted-Use Data in the RDCs"
Presenters: Peter Meyer and Tabatha McNeill, National Center for Health Statistics


About the Presenters

Ron S. Jarmin received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Oregon in 1992. He began his career as an economist at the U.S. Census Bureau’s Center for Economic Studies where he is now the Chief Economist. His responsibilities include managing the Census Bureau’s network of Research Data Centers, a staff of research economists and the Longitudinal Employer Household Dynamics program. He has published papers in the areas of industrial organization, technology and firm performance, electronic business, industrial classification, and urban economics. He has done considerable research on business dynamics including leading the development of the Census Bureau’s Longitudinal Business Database and the new Business Dynamics Statistics Series.

Lynn Riggs has been an economist with the U.S. Bureau of the Census, Center for Economic Studies since 2002 and is currently the Lead RDC Administrator. Dr. Riggs has conducted research related to policy evaluation, health care, education, and social welfare including the effects of policy on consumer and producer incentives to undertake food safety efforts. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 1998 and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2000.

Lucia Foster is the Assistant Division Chief of Research for the Center for Economic Studies. She received her Ph.D. in economics from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1998. While in graduate school, Lucia served as a Special Sworn Status Research Assistant in the Research Data Center Lab at Census Headquarters. After graduation she joined the Census Bureau's Center for Economic Studies. She has published papers in the areas of productivity dynamics, job flows, and wage dispersion.

Peter Meyer is the Director of the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) Research Data Center (RDC). His graduate training is in economics and public health. Prior to coming to the RDC, Peter worked on the National Health Interview Survey and led a research project on economic measurement. He also held a faculty position at the University of Maryland Center on Aging. In an earlier career, Peter spent over ten years working in the intelligence community. This blend of survey, academic, and classified data analysis experience equip him well for the job of providing researchers access to sensitive NCHS data.

Tabatha L. McNeill joined the Research Data Center (RDC) in July 2008. She provides technical assistance to researchers who wish to access non-public use data files. She also assists the RDC director with the daily operations of the Research Data Center. Before coming to NCHS, Ms. McNeill was a Program Associate for Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation. Tabatha has a MPH in Behavioral Science and Health Education.

Sponsors

The California Census Research Data Center
The Nicholas C. Petris Center on Health care Markets and Consumer Welfare
The Center for Health Research
Health Services and Policy Analysis Program, School of Public Health
Department of Economics
The Institute of Business and Economic Research (IBER)
The Haas School of Business
Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies


Questions?

Please contact Jon Stiles (jons@berkeley.edu) if you have questions about the CCRDC or these presentations.

Posted by cthomsen at 01:14 PM

Poll Shows Democrats' Racial Views Could Hurt Obama in Close Election

A poll commissioned by IRiSS and AP-Yahoo News suggests that Barack Obama could lose a close election to John McCain because of voters' feelings about race.

The poll says a third of white Democrats agreed with at least one negative adjective associated with blacks in the survey, and they are significantly less likely to vote for Obama than those who don't have such views.

The results suggest that the percentage of voters who don't vote for Obama because he's black could be larger than the 2.5 percentage points between George Bush and John Kerry in the 2004 election.

"There are a lot fewer bigots than there were 50 years ago, but that doesn't mean there's only a few bigots," said Stanford political scientist Paul Sniderman, who helped analyze the survey.

Ten percent of white respondents said the fact that Obama would be the country's first black president made them less likely to vote for him. Six percent said that factor would make them more likely to vote for him, and 84 percent said it wouldn't affect their decision. Twenty-one percent of whites say black leaders have been "trying to push too fast," while 12 percent say they haven't pushed fast enough and 62 percent say they're pushing at about the right speed.

While race is an indisputable factor in the election, it's not the biggest issue hurting Obama among Democrats and independents. Those groups are more concerned about his competency, with more than a quarter of Obama's fellow Democrats doubting that he'll be able to bring the change they want.

For more analysis of the poll and to read the survey results, visit http://news.yahoo.com/page/election-2008-political-pulse-obama-race.

Posted by tanya at 09:53 AM

September 11, 2008

REP Researcher Featured in Almanac

A study on the impact avatars can have on behavior, diet and health changes is featured in The Almanac. (9/10/08) The story highlights the work of Jesse Fox, researcher and manager of the Virtual Human Interaction Lab. Some of Fox's studies are conducted at the IRiSS Research Experience Program, in collaboration with Foothill Community College.

To read the full story, see http://www.almanacnews.com/story.php?story_id=6839

Posted by cthomsen at 10:23 AM

September 10, 2008

IRiSS Hosts New NPLS Study

The National Public Life Survey (NPLS) is a research study run by the
University of Michigan and Stanford University, with funding from the
National Science Foundation. In NPLS studies, people from across the
country share their experiences and opinions about a wide range of
important social issues. The information from these studies is used to
answer many questions about how American citizens view their lives.
The users of the data include scores of researchers in universities
and independent research organizations. The data are also used by many
teachers who use the data to help students better understand America
today.

For more information, see the NPLS website at
www.nationalpubliclifestudy.org.

Posted by cthomsen at 11:35 AM