IREPP"
Contact IREPP
Institute for Research on Education Policy & Practice
Stanford University
520 Galvez Mall, 5th Floor
Stanford, CA 94305
Tel: 650.736.1258
Fax: 650.723.9931
Email: irepp@suse.stanford.edu
IREPP Graduate Students

Nicole Arshan ( This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ) is a doctoral student with an interest in how the American education system reproduces or alleviates inequality, with particular focus on access to and preparation for post-secondary education. Nicole graduated from the College of William and Mary in 2000 with a BA in History and entered the doctoral program directly from SUSE's Master's program in Social Sciences in Education. Previous work experience includes IT consulting with Accenture and undergraduate admissions at Georgetown University.

Allison Atteberry ( This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ) is a fourth year doctoral student in the Administration and Policy Analysis program at Stanford University. She received her B.A. from the University of Chicago in Sociology and Political Science, and is now concurrently pursuing a masters in statistics.  Her academic interests involve research on strategies to improve learning opportunities for children in disadvantaged settings.  In particular, Allison focuses on accountability policies in education, technological advancements in assessments of learning, and the development of professionalism and expertise in teaching in public schools.  She also has a strong interest in quantitative methods and causal analysis.

Rekha Balu ( This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ) is a PhD Candidate in the Economics of Education program. She studies school finance and teacher policies. She also has studied the role of schools in post-conflict countries, and the impact of health on education outcomes in developing countries. Previously, she served as Associate Director of the Center for Universal Education in Washington, D.C., a Fulbright Scholar in Guatemala, an education research consultant and a journalist. She received her Ed.M. from Harvard Graduate School of Education and her B.S. from Northwestern University. 

Daphna Bassok ( This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ) is a doctoral student in the Economics of Education program at Stanford University.  She received her BA from the University of  Michigan in Economics and History, and her MA at Stanford in Policy Analysis and Evaluation.  Before coming to Stanford, Daphna taught kindergarten through second grade in Seattle, WA.  Her research is focused on early childhood education-- with a particular interest in the impacts of center based care participation for low-income children and the policy implications of preschool expansion initiatives.

Brent Evans ( This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ) is a doctoral student in Higher Education at Stanford University.  He received a BA from the University of Virginia in Physics and American Government and a M.Ed. in Higher Education from Harvard University.  Brent's professional experience includes teaching at Haileybury College in England, working in undergraduate admissions at the University of Virginia, and conducting research and policy analysis on federal financial aid in Washington DC for the Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance.  Working in collaboration with Eric Bettinger, his current research interests focus on higher education access and persistence.

Erica Greenberg ( This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ) is a first year doctoral student in Administration and Policy Analysis. She graduated from Yale University in 2006 with a BA in History and Linguistics. After college, she served as research assistant to Sharon Lynn Kagan at the National Center for Children and Families at Teachers College, Columbia University. She also taught pre-kindergarten at KIPP DC: LEAP Academy. At Stanford, Erica is pursuing a MA in Political Science and was awarded an IES training grant. Her research interests include early childhood policy, achievement gaps, and the politics of education. 

Elena Grewal ( This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ) is a first year graduate student in the Economics of Education.  In 2006, she received her BA with distinction in Ethics, Politics, and Economics, from Yale University.  At Yale, she completed her senior thesis with Dr. Edward Zigler, exploring strategies to reduce the socio-economic achievement gap in the US education system.  She was the recipient of the Michael Manzella Fellowship and also was awarded a grant from the George Walter Leitner Program in Political Economy for her work in India on the effects of decentralization on the implementation of the "Education for All" initiative.  She spent this past year at IREPP as a research assistant, working closely with Susanna Loeb on the Getting Down to Facts project.  In her free time she enjoys playing the piano, singing, and playing bridge. 

Alicia Grunow ( This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ) is a doctoral candidate in the Administration and Policy Analysis program at Stanford University. She received her B.A. in psychology from Reed College in 1999. Before coming to Stanford, she taught for seven years in Transitional Bilingual and Dual Language elementary school programs in both Denver and New York City. Her research interests focus on policies and practices to improve the educational experiences of English Learners.


Heather Hough ( This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ) is a doctoral student in Administration and Policy Analysis at the Stanford University School of Education.  She received her Bachelor's degree in Public Policy with a concentration in Social Policy from Stanford University.  Before coming to Stanford, Heather worked as a Research Analyst in the Center for Education Policy at SRI International, where much of her research focused on teacher development, school improvement, and resource distribution.  At IREPP, Heather focuses on using data to understand the effect of policy interventions at the district level.

Matt Kasman ( This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it )


Daniel Klasik ( This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ) Daniel Klasik is a doctoral student in the Administration and Policy Analysis program at Stanford University.  He received his BA in Psychology and Mathematics from Williams College in 2003.  After college, he spent two years working as an admissions officer at Vassar College followed by two years in Washington, DC as a research assistant in the Education Policy Center of the Urban Institute.  He is advised by Susanna Loeb and Sean Reardon and his research interests are primarily focused on issues related to higher education access.  In addition to his PhD, Daniel is also pursuing a masters in Economics.

Jeannie Myung ( This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ) is a doctoral candidate in Administration and Policy Analysis at Stanford University.  She received a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science at Yale University and a Master’s degree in Social Sciences in Education at Stanford University.  Her research interests include teacher labor markets, resource allocation, school leadership, and teacher development. Before coming to Stanford, Jeannie taught in a public elementary school in San Jose, California. 

Maria Perez ( This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ) is a Ph.D candidate in the Economics of Education program at Stanford University.  She currently works with Susanna Loeb at IREPP conducting research on how differences on teachers' value added affect teacher attrition.  Before coming to Stanford, she worked at the American Institute for Research (AIR) where she gained extensive experience directing evaluation projects on a range of public policy issues, particularly those related with English language learners, low performing schools, and students with disabilities.  While at AIR, Maria served as a project director for two studies that were part of the California School Finance Initiative, Getting Down to Facts.  At Stanford, Maria is also pursuing a MA in economics.  Website. 

Imeh Williams ( This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ) is a doctoral student in Administration and Policy Analysis at Stanford University. He received his BA in Computer Science from Brown University in 2001.  Prior to his doctoral studies, Imeh worked for six years as a research associate for Policy Studies Associates in Washington, DC, where he managed and supported studies of youth development programs and NCLB implementation.   Imeh’s research interests include principal labor markets, accountability, and resource allocation. At Stanford, Imeh is pursuing a master’s degree in economics.

Jon Valant ( This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it )  is a doctoral student in the Administration and Policy Analysis program at Stanford University.  Prior to Stanford, he worked in data analysis and curriculum development for various urban charter management organizations.  He currently studies school choice and other K-12 policies as they pertain to the achievement gaps facing historically disadvantaged groups.  Jon holds a Master's degree in public policy from the Harvard Kennedy School and a Bachelor's degree in political science and philosophy from the University of Michigan.  His faculty advisor is Susanna Loeb.