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Black youth matters: Transitions from school to success

Black Youth Matters

Publication Type:

Book

Source:

Critical youth studies, Routledge, New York, p.163 (2010)

Call Number:

Cubb LC212.3 .G7 W74 2010

URL:

http://searchworks.stanford.edu/view/8447079

Keywords:

Black--Education--Great Britain, Black--Great Britain--Social conditions, Discrimination in education--Great Britain, Success--Great Britain, Youth

Abstract:

Contents: Theorising youth transitions : the intersectionality of race, ethnicity, gender and social class -- Resistance, resilience and empowering habitus : connecting identities, ambitions and "success" -- The role of family and kinship in achieving "success" -- Peers and friendship networks in "success" making -- Collective resistance : community networks and social capital in success making -- Youth, "race"/ethnicity and social mobility in contemporary society -- Understanding black youth, success and transitions in society today.

Notes:

"Black Youth Matters presents a compelling, empirical picture of black youth who creatively respond to permanent school exclusion. Structural approaches to social stratification often set the terms of discussion around isolated narratives of individual "success stories." In this book, the authors intervene with a new point of view by focusing instead on collectives of broader black communities. They both engage with and move beyond structural models of stratification and education, thereby affirming the enduring importance of individual and collective aspiration - an impulse that has not been exhausted for black youth even in the face of systematic, longstanding, and overwhelming inequality. Based on long-term ethnographic research with young people permanently excluded from school, Black Youth Matters examines the resourcefulness of young black people in overcoming the process of school failure to forge more positive futures for themselves. This book should be of interest to sociologists, educators, anthropologists, policy-makers, as well as community activists."