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Violence in student writing : a school administrator's guide

Publication Type:

Book

Source:

Corwin, Thousand Oaks, Calif., p.118 (2013)

Call Number:

Cubb LB3013.32 .O48 2013

URL:

http://searchworks.stanford.edu/view/10094553

Keywords:

High school students' writings, School management and organization--United States, School violence--United States--Prevention, Violence in literature

Abstract:

Contents: Chapter 1: Aftermath Of Columbine On Student Writing -- Brief history of school violence -- Columbine and Jonesboro shootings: writings as a pretext for violence -- Columbine effect -- Aftermath of Columbine on the student writer: -- Boston, Massachusetts -- Cary, Illinois -- West Warwick, Rhode Island -- Prosser, Washington -- Johnston, Rhode Island -- Summary -- Practical applications for teachers and administrators -- For K-6 schools -- For 7-12 schools -- Questions to consider -- Chapter 2: Schooling For Citizenship: A Legal Primer For Educators: -- Freedom of expression in today's public schools -- U.S. Constitution -- Tinker v. Des Moines Independent School District (1969) -- Bethel v. Fraser (1986) -- Hazelwood v Kuhlmeier (1988) -- Morse v. Frederick (2007) -- How do these cases apply to classroom writing samples? -- True threat standard -- Court's call for citizenship education -- Citizenship education through the curriculum -- Courts agree: public schools are more than books and pencils -- Summary -- Practical applications for teachers and administrators: -- For K-6 schools -- For 7-12 schools -- Questions to consider -- Chapter 3: School Culture And Student Safety: -- What students write about (and what it can say about your school culture) -- School administrator's influence on school culture -- Improving your school culture -- Summary -- Practical applications for teachers and administrators: -- For K-6 schools -- For 7-12 schools -- Questions to consider -- Chapter 4: Regulating Student Expression: Examining Your School Policy: -- Why a zero tolerance approach fails everyone -- Incorporating legal principles into school policies -- Sample policies -- Summary -- Practical applications for teachers and administrators: -- For K-6 schools -- For 7-12 schools -- Questions to consider -- Chapter 5: Violent Writing Within The Classroom -- Freewriting is not the cause of school violence -- Writing as a predictor of violence -- Writing instead of violence -- Unique nature of the writing classroom -- "But, teacher, I want to be the next Stephen King." -- Lost lesson: purpose and audience -- Advice for all teachers of writing -- Summary -- Practical applications for teachers and administrators: -- For K-6 schools -- For 7-12 schools -- Questions to consider --; Contents: Chapter 6: Violent Writing Beyond The Classroom: -- Off-campus writings -- Cases where schools prevailed -- Cases where students prevailed -- Cyberbullying, texting, and Facebook writings -- When the violent writing targets you -- Staying informed -- Summary -- Practical applications for teachers and administrators -- For K-6 schools -- For 7-12 schools -- Questions to consider -- Chapter 7: Communicating With Teachers About Violence In Student Writing -- Conversing with teachers before the school year begins -- Recognizing potential syllabus problems -- Reviewing teacher classroom policies -- Suggesting teaching methods when you are not a writing teacher -- Continuing the conversation -- Summary -- Practical applications for teachers and administrators -- For K-6 schools -- For 7-12 schools -- Questions to consider -- Chapter 8: Threat Assessment For Student Violent Writing Incidents -- Assessment does not mean profiling -- Listening and threat assessment -- Keep a copy of student writing -- Sample threat assessment form for student violent writing incidents -- Summary -- Practical applications for teachers and administrators -- For K-6 schools -- For 7-12 schools -- Questions to consider -- Chapter 9: Acting And Responding To Student Violent Writing -- Need for a timely response -- Responding reasonably to all student violent writing -- Creating a documentation trail -- Potential administrative responses -- Summary -- Practical applications for teachers and administrators -- For K-6 schools -- For 7-12 schools -- Questions to consider -- Appendix.; Summary: From the Back Cover: At what point should student expressions of violence be considered a legitimate threat? This legal handbook helps you apply caution and logic in protecting your students' freedom of speech while also protecting the safety of everyone in the building. Gretchen Oltman, an experienced educator and licensed attorney, shows you how to react appropriately to warning signs from students. You'll discover how to: prevent violence by creating a positive and safe school environment; guide teachers in assessing written threats of violence; evaluate writing outside the classroom, including texting and Facebook postings. Violence in Student Writing delves into the real-life experiences of administrators, teachers, and students, exploring current and relevant issues in student-written violence and offering solutions that every school administrator needs to know.

Publication Language:

eng