What Would Jesus Do (about climate change)?

Climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe discusses her Christianity in the context of her academic career… and her marriage to a one time climate skeptic.  She also reflects on whether or not the Anthropocene might have begun with Adam & Eve’s exodus from the Garden of Eden.

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Contributor

Katharine Hayhoe
Katharine Hayhoe is an atmospheric scientist who studies climate change, one of the most pressing issues facing the planet today. An expert reviewer for the Nobel Peace Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, her life’s work has been dedicated to discovering and communicating the realities of a changing climate to those who will be affected most by it.  As an associate professor in the Department of Political Science and director of the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University, part of the Department of Interior’s South-Central Climate Science Center, Katharine develops new ways to quantify the potential impacts of human activities at the regional scale. As founder and CEO of ATMOS Research, she also bridges the gap between scientists and stakeholders to provide relevant, state-of-the-art information on how climate change will affect our lives to a broad range of non-profit, industry and government clients.

Interviewer

Jeremy Caves
Jeremy is a PhD candidate at Stanford University who is interested in understanding long-term controls on the Earth’s terrestrial climate and oceans.  During this interval, the Earth underwent a fundamental shift in its climate, transitioning from the hot, high-CO2 climate that characterized the Cretaceous to the relatively cool, low-CO2 climate of today.  Understanding this transition can elucidate first-order controls on Earth’s climate as well as improve understanding of what our future climate may resemble given current projections of CO2 emissions.

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