The (mad) science of geoengineering

Climate scientist Ken Caldeira begins with a discussion of ocean acidification, a term he helped coin.  He follows with the story of how his name became attached to geoengineering, from his own skeptical beginnings to publishing a paper that basically said, “well, it works in the models but don’t try this at home.”  Along the way, Caldeira also shares some funny experiences addressing climate skeptics, including how geoengineering has even helped persuade a few.

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Contributor

Ken Caldeira
Ken Caldeira is a senior member of the Carnegie Institution’s Department of Global Ecology staff and a professor, by courtesy, in Stanford’s Environmental Earth System Sciences department. Professor Caldeira has a wide-spectrum approach to analyzing the world’s climate systems. He studies the global carbon cycle; marine biogeochemistry and chemical oceanography, including ocean acidification and the atmosphere/ocean carbon cycle; land-cover and climate change; the long-term evolution of climate and geochemical cycles; and energy technology. He is a lead author of the “State of the Carbon Cycle Report,” a study requested by the U.S. Congress.

Interviewers

Mike Osborne
Mike Osborne is currently a fifth year PhD student using stable isotope and trace metal geochemistry to analyze coral records from the western Pacific.  In particular, he is interested in decadal scale variability and dynamics in the El Niño/La Niña Southern Oscillation (ENSO) system.  His current fieldwork is done in the Republic of Palau and Easter Island.  In addition to his paleoclimate research, Mike has developed and taught science communication courses at Stanford.  These courses are project-based and generally focus on 21stcentury environmental issues.

Miles Traer
Miles Traer began his academic career at UC Berkeley with a double major in Geophysics and Art History.  He is currently a fifth-year PhD student in the Tectonic Geomorphology Lab modeling the evolution of the seafloor.  Miles was first turned on to podcasts in 2007 and quickly became an avid consumer.  Some of his favorites include The BS Report, the StarTalk Radio podcast, In Our Time with Melvyn Bragg, The Nerdist, and WTF with Marc Maron.  In addition to his work as a scientist, Miles works as a part-time artist, contributing the art of this website including the portraits found on each interview’s page (drawn by hand).  When he’s not working on science or this podcast, you can generally find him cooking cajun gumbo and listening to blues.

 

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