How farmers are adapting to climate change

Fran Moore talks about various ways that farmers in Europe have adjusted to higher temperatures in recent years, and sheds light on the difficulty of singling out the effect of climate change on farmers’ decision-making. She also discusses how differently climate scientists and economists view adaptation. For her masters research, Fran studied the way climate adaptation policy is put together during international negotiations, and she explains why there isn’t a clear definition of what counts as “successful” adaptation.


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Contributor

Fran Moore
Frances Moore is a PhD student at Stanford whose research focuses on projecting the rate and effectiveness of autonomous adaptation by farmers in order to understand the impact of climate change on future agricultural production and food security. Before coming to Stanford, Fran obtained a Masters in Environmental Science at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies where her research focused on the construction of adaptation policy in international negotiations. She observed and participated in several of the UNFCCC meetings, culminating in COP15 in Copenhagen. Fran has also published several articles on the mitigation potential of short-lived greenhouse gases in developing countries.

Interviewers

Leslie Chang
Leslie Chang is a recent graduate of Stanford University, where she studied Earth Systems and creative writing. She has been a correspondent for Generation Anthropocene since the podcast’s earliest days, and fully joined the team after graduating in June 2012. In her spare time, she might be found camping, cooking, teaching piano, or enjoying a book with a mug of coffee. She is an avid fan of NPR, sea otters, SNL, free food samples, and anyone who posts interesting articles to Twitter. That could be you.

Mike Osborne
Mike Osborne is currently a fifth year PhD student using stable isotope and trace metal geochemistry to analyze coral records from the western Pacific.  In particular, he is interested in decadal scale variability and dynamics in the El Niño/La Niña Southern Oscillation (ENSO) system.  His current fieldwork is done in the Republic of Palau and Easter Island.  In addition to his paleoclimate research, Mike has developed and taught science communication courses at Stanford.  These courses are project-based and generally focus on 21st century environmental issues.

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