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Master of Science in Environment and Resources

Students may not apply directly for the M.S. in Environment and Resources degree. The M.S. is an option exclusively for students currently enrolled in the joint degree programs with the M.B.A. in the Graduate School of Business or the J.D. with the Stanford Law School; concurrently pursuing the M.D. in the School of Medicine; or for E-IPER Ph.D. students who do not continue in the Ph.D. degree program.

JOINT MASTER'S DEGREE

Students enrolled in a professional degree program in Stanford's Graduate School of Business or the Stanford Law School are eligible to apply for admission to the joint M.S. in Environment and Resources degree program (JDP). Enrollment in the JDP allows students to pursue an M.S. degree concurrently with their professional degree and to count a defined number of units toward both degrees, resulting in the award of joint M.B.A. and M.S. in Environment and Resources degrees or joint J.D. and M.S. in Environment and Resources degrees.

The joint M.B.A./M.S. degree program requires a total of 129 quarter units to be completed over approximately eight academic quarters (compared to 105 units for the M.B.A. and 45 units for the M.S. if pursued as separate degrees).

The joint J.D./M.S. degree program requires a minimum of 111 quarter units, although it is possible that students may need to take additional units to satisfy the degree requirements for both the J.D. and M.S. The joint J.D/M.S. may be completed in three years.

The student's program of study is subject to the approval of the student's faculty adviser and E-IPER staff. The joint degrees are conferred when the requirements for both the E-IPER M.S. and the professional degree programs have been met. For application information, see http://e-iper.stanford.edu/admissions.php. For additional information, see http://e-iper.stanford.edu/academic.requirements.php.

In addition to requirements for the professional degree, requirements for the JDP include:

  1. Completion of a required introductory core course:
    • For joint M.B.A/M.S. students: ENVRES 338, Environmental Science for Managers and Policy Makers (same as OIT 338). If offered, ENVRES 339/OIT 339 also fulfills this requirement.
    • For all other JDP students: ENVRES 310, Environmental Forum Seminar.
  2. Attendance at two mandatory workshops to be held in Autumn Quarter 2010 to introduce new E-IPER joint M.S. students to the E-IPER community and program requirements.
  3. Completion and presentation of a capstone project that integrates the student's professional and M.S. degrees, as part of the required course ENVRES 290, Capstone Project Seminar in Environment and Resources.
  4. Completion of a minimum of four letter-graded courses, while maintaining a 'B' average, from one joint M.S. course track:
    • Energy
    • Climate and Atmosphere
    • Cleantech
    • Land Use and Agriculture
    • Oceans and Estuaries
    • Freshwater
    • Global, Community, and Environmental Health
    • Sustainable Built Environment.

    Approved courses in each track are below. See also http://e-iper.stanford.edu/academic.jointms.curriculum.php.

  5. Completion of at least four additional graded elective courses at the 100-level or higher, which may be taken from one or more course tracks or elsewhere in the University, while maintaining a 'B' average.
  6. Among the courses fulfilling requirements 4 and 5 above, completion of at least four courses at the 200-level or above, excluding individual study courses. Individual study courses, directed reading. and independent research units may count for a maximum of 4 units for joint M.S. students (such as ENVRES 398 or ENVRES 399).

Restrictions on course work that may fulfill the Joint M.S. degree include:

  1. A maximum of 5 units from courses that are identified as primarily consisting of guest lectures, such as the Energy Seminar or the Environmental Law Workshop, may be counted toward the joint M.S. degree. Additional courses in this category are listed at http://e-iper.stanford.edu/academic.jointms.curriculum.php.
  2. A maximum of 12 units from approved courses related to the environmental and resource fields from the student's professional school may be applied toward the M.S. A list of approved courses from the GSB, School of Law, and School of Medicine can be found at http://e-iper.stanford.edu/academic.jointms.curriculum.php.

DUAL MASTER'S DEGREE

Only students in the School of Medicine may apply to pursue the M.S. in Environment and Resources degree. For the dual degree, students must meet the University's minimum requirements for the M.D. and complete an additional 45 units for the M.S. in Environment and Resources. Completion of the M.S. is anticipated to require at least three quarters in addition to the quarters required for the M.D. For additional information, see http://e-iper.stanford.edu/academic.requirements.php.

The student's program of study is subject to the approval of the student's faculty adviser and E-IPER staff. The two degrees are conferred when the requirements for both the E-IPER M.S. and the professional degree programs have been met. For application information, see http://e-iper.stanford.edu/admissions.php.

In addition to requirements for the M.D., requirements for the dual M.S. include:

  1. Completion of a required introductory core course: ENVRES 310, Environmental Forum Seminar.
  2. Attendance at two mandatory workshops to be held in Autumn Quarter 2010 to introduce all new E-IPER joint M.S. students to the E-IPER community and program requirements.
  3. Completion and presentation of a capstone project that integrates the student's professional and M.S. degrees, as part of the required course ENVRES 290, Capstone Project Seminar in Environment and Resources.
  4. Completion of a minimum of four graded courses, while maintaining a 'B' average, from one Joint M.S. Course Track:
    • Energy
    • Climate and Atmosphere
    • Cleantech
    • Land Use and Agriculture
    • Oceans and Estuaries
    • Freshwater
    • Global, Community, and Environmental Health
    • Sustainable Built Environment.

    Approved courses in each track are below. See also http://e-iper.stanford.edu/academic.jointms.curriculum.php.

  5. Completion of at least four additional letter-graded elective courses at the 100-level or higher, which may be taken from one or more course tracks or elsewhere in the University, while maintaining a 'B' average.
  6. Among the courses fulfilling requirements 4 and 5 above, completion of at least four courses at the 200-level or above, excluding individual study courses. Individual study courses, directed reading, and independent research units may count for a maximum of 4 units for dual M.S. students (such as ENVRES 398 or ENVRES 399).

Restrictions on course work that may fulfill the Dual M.S. degree include:

  1. A maximum of 5 units from courses that are identified as primarily consisting of guest lectures, such as the Energy Seminar or the Environmental Law Workshop may be counted toward the Joint M.S. degree. Additional courses in this category are listed at http://e-iper.stanford.edu/academic.jointms.curriculum.php.
  2. A maximum of 12 units from courses related to the environmental and resource fields from the student's professional school may be applied toward the M.S. A list of approved courses from the GSB, School of Law, and School of Medicine can be found at http://e-iper.stanford.edu/academic.jointms.curriculum.php.

Joint M.S. and Dual M.S. Course Tracks

Students should consult Stanford Bulletin's Explore Courses web site to determine course description, class schedule, location, eligibility, and prerequisites. Course tracks and other recommended courses are also available at http://e-iper.stanford.edu/academic.jointms.curriculum.php.

ENERGY

APPPHYS 219. Solid State Physics and the Energy Challenge

CEE 173A. Energy Resources

CEE 176A. Energy Efficient Buildings

CEE 176B. Electric Power: Renewables and Efficiency

CEE 236. Green Architecture

CEE 272P. Distributed Generation and Grid Integration of Renewables

CHEMENG 454. Synthetic Biology and Metabolic Engineering

EARTHSYS 232. Energy Cooperation in the Western Hemisphere

EE 237. Solar Conversion

EE 293A. Fundamentals of Energy Processes

EE 293B. Fundamentals of Energy Processes

ENERGY 101. Energy and the Environment

ENERGY 102. Renewable Energy Sources and Greener Energy Processes

ENERGY 104. Technology in the Greenhouse

ENERGY 120. Fundamentals of Petroleum Engineering

ENERGY 208. Large Scale Solar Technology and Policy

ENERGY 226. Thermal Recovery Methods

ENERGY 227. Enhanced Oil Recovery

ENERGY 253. Carbon Capture and Sequestration

ENERGY 269. Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

ENERGY 291. Optimization of Energy Systems

MS&E 198. Applied Modeling of Energy and Environmental Markets

MS&E 243. Energy and Environmental Policy Analysis

MS&E 295. Energy Policy Analysis

MS&E 296. Sustainable Mobility: Improving Energy Efficiency and Reducing CO2 Emissions from Transport

MS&E 491. Real-World Clean Energy Project Development

MATSCI 256. Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries

MATSCI 302. Solar Cells

MATSCI 316. Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology

ME 260. Fuel Cell Science and Technology

ME 370A. Energy Systems I: Thermodynamics

ME 370B. Energy Systems II: Modeling and Advanced Concepts

ME 370C. Energy Systems III: Projects

CLIMATE AND ATMOSPHERE

BIO 117. Biology and Global Change

BIO 247. Controlling Climate Change in the 21st Century

BIO 264. Biosphere-Atmosphere Interactions

CEE 172. Air Quality Management

CEE 263A. Air Pollution Modeling

CEE 263D. Air Pollution: From Urban Smog to Global Change

CEE 278A. Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry

CEE 278B. Atmospheric Aerosols

CEE 278C. Indoor Air Quality

EARTHSYS 143. Climate Change in the West: A History of the Future

EARTHSYS 233. California Climate Change Law and Policy

EARTHSYS 284. Climate and Agriculture

EESS 246A. Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: The Atmospheric Circulation

EESS 246B. Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: The Ocean Circulation

ENERGY 253. Carbon Capture and Sequestration

MS&E 294. Climate Policy Analysis

MS&E 296. Sustainable Mobility: Improving Energy Efficiency and Reducing CO2 Emissions from Transport

CLEANTECH

APPPHYS 219. Solid State Physics and the Energy Challenge

CHEMENG 274. Environmental Microbiology I

CHEMENG 355. Advanced Biochemical Engineering

CHEMENG 454. Synthetic Biology and Metabolic Engineering

CHEMENG 456. Metabolic Biochemistry of Microorganisms

CEE 172P. Distributed Generation and Grid Integration of Renewables

CEE 173A. Energy Resources

CEE 176A. Energy Efficient Buildings

CEE 176B. Electric Power: Renewables and Efficiency

CEE 215. Goals and Methods of Sustainable Building Projects

CEE 226. Life Cycle Assessment for Complex Systems

CEE 275B. Process Design for Environmental Biotechnology

ENERGY 253. Carbon Capture and Sequestration

ENERGY 269. Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

MS&E 264. Sustainable Product Development and Manufacturing

MS&E 296. Sustainable Mobility: Improving Energy Efficiency and Reducing CO2 Emissions from Transport

MS&E 491. Real-World Clean Energy Project Development

MATSCI 302. Solar Cells

MATSCI 316. Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology

ME 221. Green Design Strategies

ME 222. Design for Sustainability

ME 260. Fuel Cell Science and Technology

LAND USE AND AGRICULTURE

BIO 101. Ecology

BIO 117. Biology and Global Change

BIO 121. Biogeography

BIO 125: Ecosystems of California

BIO 144. Conservation Biology

BIO 206. Field Studies in Earth Systems

BIO 216. Terrestrial Biogeochemistry

BIO 264. Biosphere-Atmosphere Interactions

BIO 280. Fundamentals of Sustainable Agriculture

EARTHSYS 143. Climate Change in the West: A History of the Future

EARTHSYS 233. California Climate Change Law and Policy

EARTHSYS 273. Aquaculture and the Environment: Science, History, and Policy

EARTHSYS 281. Concepts of Urban Agriculture

EARTHSYS 284. Climate and Agriculture

EESS 155. Science of Soils

EESS 162. Remote Sensing of Land Use and Land Cover

EESS 256. Soil Chemistry

URBANST 163. Land Use Control

URBANST 165. Sustainable Urban and Regional Transportation Planning

OCEANS AND ESTUARIES

BIO 274S. Hopkins Microbiology Course

BIOHOPK 263H. Oceanic Biology

BIOHOPK 271H. Ecological and Evolutionary Physiology

BIOHOPK 272H. Marine Ecology

BIOHOPK 285H. Ecology and Conservation of Kelp Forest Communities

CEE 262D. Introduction to Physical Oceanography

CEE 272. Coastal Contaminants

CEE 275A. Law and Science of California Coastal Policy

EARTHSYS 208. Coastal Wetlands

EARTHSYS 273. Aquaculture and the Environment: Science, History, and Policy

EESS 241. Remote Sensing of the Oceans

EESS 243. Marine Biogeochemistry

EESS 244. Marine Ecosystem Modeling

EESS 246A. Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: The Atmospheric Circulation

EESS 246B. Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: The Ocean Circulation

EESS 258. Geomicrobiology

FRESHWATER

CEE 101B. Mechanics of Fluids

CEE 177. Aquatic Chemistry and Biology

CEE 260A. Physical Hydrogeology

CEE 260C. Contaminant Hydrogeology

CEE 262A. Hydrodynamics

CEE 262B. Transport and Mixing in Surface Water Flows

CEE 262E. Lakes and Reservoirs

CEE 264A. Rivers, Streams, and Canals

CEE 265A. Sustainable Water Resources Development

CEE 265C. Water Resources Management

CEE 265D. Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries

CEE 266A. Watersheds and Wetlands

CEE 266B. Floods and Droughts, Dams and Aqueducts

CEE 266D. Water Resources and Water Hazards Field Trips

CEE 268. Groundwater Flow

CEE 270. Movement and Fate of Organic Contaminants in Waters

CEE 271A. Physical and Chemical Treatment Processes

CEE 273. Aquatic Chemistry

CEE 273A. Water Chemistry Laboratory

CEE 275B. Process Design for Environmental Biotechnology

EARTHSYS 143. Climate Change in the West: A History of the Future

EARTHSYS 233. California Climate Change Law and Policy

EARTHSYS 273. Aquaculture and the Environment: Science, History, and Policy

GLOBAL, COMMUNITY, AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

ANTHRO 261A. Ecology, Nature, and Society: Principles in Human Ecology

ANTHRO 262. Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Problems

ANTHRO 263. Conservation and Evolutionary Ecology

ANTHRO 266. Political Ecology of Tropical Land Use

ANTHRO 277. Environmental Change and Emerging Infectious Diseases

ANTHRO 282. Medical Anthropology

ANTHRO 291C. Anthropological Methods in Ecology, Environment, Evolution

ANTHRO 362. Conservation and Evolutionary Ecology

BIO 102. Demography: Health, Development, Environment

BIO 117. Biology and Global Change

CEE 260C. Contaminant Hydrogeology

CEE 263A. Air Pollution Modeling

CEE 263D. Air Pollution: From Urban Smog to Global Change

CEE 265A. Sustainable Water Resources Development

CEE 265C. Water Resources Management

CEE 265D. Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries

CEE 270. Movement and Fate of Organic Contaminants in Waters

CEE 272. Coastal Contaminants

CEE 274D. Pathogens and Disinfection

CEE 274E. Pathogens in the Environment

CEE 276. Introduction to Human Exposure Analysis

CEE 276E. Environmental Toxicants

CEE 278A. Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry

CEE 278B. Atmospheric Aerosols

CEE 278C. Indoor Air Quality

EARTHSYS 165. Promoting Behavior Change

EARTHSYS 224. Environmental Justice: Local, National, and International Dimensions

HUMBIO 111. Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change

HUMBIO 151. Introduction to Epidemiology

HUMBIO 152. Viral Lifestyles

HUMBIO 153. Parasites and Pestilence: Infectious Public Health Challenges

HUMBIO 166. Food and Society: Exploring Eating Behaviors in Social, Environmental, and Policy Context

SUSTAINABLE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

CEE 100. Managing Sustainable Building Projects

CEE 136. Green Architecture

CEE 176A. Energy Efficient Buildings

CEE 176B. Electric Power: Renewables and Efficiency

CEE 177P. Sustainability in Theory and Practice

CEE 215. Goals and Methods of Sustainable Building Projects

CEE 224A. Sustainable Development Studio

CEE 226. Life Cycle Assessment for Complex Systems

CEE 248. Real Estate Development

CEE 248G. Certifying Green Buildings

CEE 265A. Sustainable Water Resources Development

CEE 272P. Distributed Generation and Grid Integration of Renewables

CEE 341P. Politics and Infrastructure Investment

MS&E 296. Sustainable Mobility: Improving Energy Efficiency and Reducing CO2 Emissions from Transport

URBANST 163. Land Use Control

URBANST 165. Sustainable Urban and Regional Transportation Planning

MASTER OF SCIENCE

In exceptional circumstances, E-IPER offers a Master of Science degree for students in E-IPER's Ph.D. program who opt to complete their training with a M.S. degree or who do not advance to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. Admission directly to the M.S. program is not allowed.

Requirements for the M.S. include:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 45 units at or above the 100-level, of which the majority of units should be at or above the 200-level.
  2. Completion of the E-IPER Ph.D. core curriculum, each with a letter grade of 'B' or higher, comprising:
    • ENVRES 310. Environmental Forum Seminar
    • ENVRES 315. Environmental Research Design Seminar
    • ENVRES 320. Designing Environmental Research
    • ENVRES 330. Research Approaches to Environmental Problem Solving, taken concurrently with ENVRES 398. Directed Individual Study in Environment and Resources
  3. Additional courses may be chosen from approved course lists in E-IPER's four focal areas (culture and institutions; economics and policy analysis; engineering and technology; or natural sciences) or from other courses approved by the student's lead advisers.
  4. Students may take no more than 6 of the required 45 units credit/no credit and must maintain at least a 'B' average in all courses taken for the M.S. degree.
  5. Directed research and independent study may count for a maximum of 8 units of the 45 unit M.S.

The M.S. degree does not have an M.S. with thesis option. Students may write a M.S. thesis, but it is not formally recognized by the University.

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