MAY/JUNE 1997

 Contents

 NEWS & VIEWS
 President’s Column
 On Campus
 The Role of CIV
 Campus Briefs

 Science & Medicine
 Ecological Economy
 Sci & Med Briefs

 Sports
 Stanford Basketball
 Sports Briefs

 FEATURES
 Rankings
 Spacecraft Design
 Class of 2000
 Gender Research
 Gender Paradox
 Billy Tipton
 Marilyn Yalom
 Michael Boskin


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Stanford Today

May/June 1997



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News & Views
Letter from the President - The “Vision Thing”


Why is it next to impossible to talk about a “vision” for the university? A true university’s vision is made up of the multiple pursuits of its faculty and students. The main responsibility of a university’s leaders is to create and maintain the conditions that make university work possible. These conditions do not include tightly formulated five-year plans.  By Gerhard Casper

On Campus
Reshaping the Humanities


It has been a rough year for the program in Cultures, Ideas and Values. The object of a Faculty Senate mandated review, CIV appears destined for considerable reshaping and a new name. But even as the rhetoric revs up, it is clear that a required, year-long program in cultural literacy and humanistic inquiry is here to stay.  By Diane Manuel

Campus Briefs


The Objective Has Been Met ­ The first $100 million has been pledged in a campaign to raise a $200 million endowment for graduate fellowships.    In the Best Silicon Valley Style ­ The inventors of Yahoo! have donated $2 million to establish a new endowed chair in the School of Engineering.   Tuition Up 4 Percent ­ The Board of Trustees has approved a 4 percent increase in undergraduate tuition for 1997-98.

Science & Medicine
Giving Nature a Price Tag


For thousands of years we have taken for granted the vital life-support systems of Earth that sustain our prosperity and our very lives. Now we can no longer be so blase. To replace these natural utilities would cost trillions of dollars; worse, most cannot be replaced at any cost.  By Janet Basu

Science & Medicine Briefs


Mood and Hormones ­ The Women’s Wellness Clinic offers counseling and therapy to help women going through hormonal changes.   That Gooey-Green Scum ­ A glut of nitrogen is wreaking biological havoc worldwide.   “Naive” T Cells Against HIV ­ Researchers have identified certain T cells that suppress the reproduction of HIV carried within them.

Sports News
An Affair to Remember


For a few days in February and March, when both the women’s and men’s basketball teams had reached the third round of the NCAA championship tournaments, all things were possible.  By Jim Bettinger

Sports Briefs


A Parallel End ­ No Stanford basketball fan will soon forget the explosive parallel finishes of the women’s and men’s final 1997 games.   For the First Time in 55 Years ­ “We got to a place we’d never been before,” said basketball coach Mike Montgomery.    Recruiting Stars ­ Stanford has recruited 22 high school football stars, and the women’s volleyball team has signed three outstanding high school seniors for next fall.

Features
Stanford Takes on U.S. News Rankings


A clash of values is testing the wills of scholars and publishers. On one side is President Gerhard Casper and a national corps of student activists. On the other is the editorial staff of U.S. News and World Report, which publishes its “America’s Best Colleges” issue every fall.  By Elaine Ray

Learning Curve


The fourth in an ongoing series highlighting some of Stanford’s mode thought-provoking courses.

Class of 2000


Fifth in a series: Keeping tabs on five freshmen from the last class of the Millennium.  By Marisa Cigarroa

Woman


The very science that enables sex testing is demonstrating that simple definitions are no longer biologically sound. An individual’s genes, chromosomes, anatomy and psychosocial sex characteristics may not always agree, and researchers are having trouble stuffing human biology into two distinct boxes labeled “male” and “female.”  By Sally Lehrman

Speaking of Sex


What accounts for both the variations and the universalities in sex-linked differences? This is one of the central paradoxes of gender.  By Deborah Rhode

Billy Tipton: Self-Made Man


Biographer Diane Middlebrook found herself face to face with questions about sex identity when she began researching the life of jazz musician Billy Tipton.  By Sally Lehrman

A History of the Breast


In her book tour across the United States this winter, Marilyn Yalom, a senior scholar at the Institute for Research on Women and Gender at Stanford, encountered the breast in all its vibrancy as a symbol of female identity today.  By Sally Lehrman

The Trillion-Dollar Man


Every month “comparison shoppers” across the country check prices of thousands of products and services for the nation’s Consumer Price Index. It is a vast and impressive effort, but one that Stanford economist Michael Boskin believes is flawed.  By Kathleen O’Toole

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