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Events

France-Stanford Colloquium on Greek & Latin Hymnic Poetry: Religion, literature, society: Greek and Roman hymic traditions and the performance of community

Sponsored by the Stanford Department of Classics and the France-Stanford Center for Interdisciplinary Studies

April 25 - 26, 2014, 9:00am -  6:00pm

Building 110, Room 112

Daniela Dueck (Bar Ilan Univ.): Analphabetic geography

 Co-sponsored by the Classics Department and the Program in History and Philosophy of Science.

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Building 110, Room 112

Talk begins at 5:15 PM, with light refreshments served at 5:00 PM.

SCIT presents Plautus’ Casina ‘A funny thing happened on the way to Nob Hill’ May 1st-3rd, 8pm, Toyon Hall

SCIT presents Plautus’ Casina
‘A funny thing happened on the way to Nob Hill’

Graciela Zecchin de Fasano: (Univ. La Plata): Homer's Fictions: Troublesome Narratives in Odyssey

 Friday, May 9, 2014

Building 110, Room 112

Talk begins at 5:15 PM, with light refreshments served at 5:00 PM.

Nathan Sidoli (Waseda University, Japan): Methods in Ancient Mathematical Geography

Co-Sponsored by the Classics Department and the Program in History and Philosophy of Science.

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Building 110, Room 112

Talk begins at 5:15 PM, with light refreshments served at 5:00 PM.

Prof. Christopher Krebs : An Idea of History, a History of an Idea: Polybius, Asellio, and Caesar.

Tuesday, May 20
Lunch will be provided at 1:00 PM and the talk will begin promptly at 1:15 PM.

Classics Commencement Ceremony and Reception 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday, June 14th, 2014
Hors d'ouevres and drinks at noon; diploma ceremony begins at 12:30pm
Location: The Centennial Fountain outside Green Library

Conference: "Texts and Monuments in Augustan Rome" in Rome, Italy - June 30-July 3, 2014

The aim of this summer’s international conference is to enlighten the relationship between texts and monuments in the Augustan city, giving particular (though not exclusive) attention to the Forum Romanum, an important city center often overlooked in scholarship on Augustan Rome. Investigating the relationship between the written Rome and the built Rome is nothing new; the last two decades have already seen important works by Ann Vasaly (1993), Catharine Edwards (1996), A.J. Boyle (2003), and Tara Welch (2005).