Portuguese

Todd Mack

portrait: Isaac Bleaman
Contact: 

toddmack@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
By Appointment
Curriculum Vitae: 
 
Bio: 

Todd began his career with a BA in Spanish from Brigham Young University (Magna Cum Laude 2005) and immediately followed with an MA in Spanish Peninsular Literature (2007), also from BYU. The title of his Master's thesis is The Postmodern Spanish Hero’s Journey: Compassion and Postmodernism in Contemporary Spain. His dissertation, entitled Open Wounds: Reading Contemporary Novels of War, Repression, and Memory in Four Rural Spanish Communities, focuses on the the intersection of memory, literature, and place through a study of the reception of several contemporary novels of memory in the communities they describe. In his free time he enjoys spending time with his three children and his wife, Betty. He is also an avid runner. 

Teaching Experience: 
 
Todd taught first and second year Spanish courses (two classes per semester) at Brigham Young University from 2005-2007. In 2008 he taught both first and second year Spanish courses at Stanford University and in 2009-10 he taught Catalan language and culture at Stanford University. In Winter 2011 designed and taught a class entitled Film Noir and the Contemporary Iberian Novel, also at Stanford.
 
 
 
Education: 

2007- : Stanford University. PhD student in Iberian Literatures and Cultures. Dissertation: Open Wounds: Reading Contemporary Novels of War, Repression, and Memory in Four Rural Spanish Communities. Adviser: Joan Ramon Resina. Degree expected: June, 2012.

2007: Brigham Young University. MA in Spanish. Thesis: The Postmodern Spanish Hero’s Journey: Compassion and Postmodernism in Contemporary Spain. Adviser: Gregory Stallings.

2005: Brigham Young University. BA in Spanish. Magna cum laude.

Language(s): 
Catalan
Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish

Mark L. Bajus

portrait: Mark Bajus
Contact: 

mbajus@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

 

Mark L. Bajus holds a B.A. in Spanish from Concordia University, Nebraska and an M.A. in Hispanic Literatures from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His  research focuses on modern Iberian literature with an emphasis on poetry and theater.

 

Publications:

Barletta, Vincent, Mark Bajus, and Cici Malik, eds. and trans. Dreams of Waking: An Anthology of Early Modern Iberian Lyric Poetry. Chicago: U of Chicago P, In Press.

“Cuentos no tan tontos: La crítica económica en los Cuentos tontos para niños listos de Ángela Figuera Aymerich.” Hispania 91.4 (2008): 805-14.

“Gloria Fuertes’s Vietnam War Poems: Revising the Elegiac Tradition.” In Her Words: Critical Studies on Gloria Fuertes. Ed. Margaret Persin. Lewisburg, PA: Bucknell UP, 2011.

Language(s): 
Catalan
Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish

Jorge Ruffinelli

portrait: Sylke Tempel
Contact: 

Pigott Hall 221
650 725 0112
ruffin@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Thursdays by Appointment

Professor Jorge Ruffinelli (Uruguay), a disciple of Angel Rama at the University of Uruguay, followed him as Director of the literary section of the seminal Uruguayan weekly Marcha in 1968. In 1973 he was Adjunct Professor of the Latin American literature program (directed by Noé Jitrik) at the University of Buenos Aires. In 1974 he emigrated to México, where he was appointed Director of the Centro de Investigaciones Lingüístico-Literarias at the Universidad Veracruzana, a position he held for for twelve years. At the Universidad Veracruzana he was also Professor in the school of Letters, and collaborated in all the major cultural journals and newspapers of the Latin American continent. In 1986 he was appointed Full Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Stanford. In Mexico he founded and directed the literary journal Texto crítico for twelve years. A member of various international editorial boards, in the United States he has directed the journal Nuevo texto crítico since 1987.

He has published twenty books of literary and cultural criticism and more than five hundred articles, critical notes and reviews in journals throughout the world. A recognized authority on Onetti, García Márquez, Juan Rulfo, and Latin American literary history, during the nineties his critical work has centered on Latin American cinema. In 1993 he filmed a documentary on Augusto Monterroso for which he interviewed major Mexican writers and critics. He is completing the first Encyclopedia of Latin American Cinema, for which he has written around two thousand articles on feature films from and about Latin America. His current work also includes a book of interpretation and survey of the most recent Spanish American prose published by writers born after 1968, a project that analyzes the work, marketing, and reception of over more than fifty authors (Ana Solari, Milagros Socorro, Karla Suarez, Mayra Santos, David Toscana, Rodrigo Fresan, Juan Forn, Martin Kohan, Jorge Vopli, among others). His teaching centers on the intersection of the interests above and cultural politics.

Professional Activities

At Stanford University, he has been Department Chair (1990-91, 1997), and Director of the Center of Latin American Studies (1994, 1997-1998), as well as a member of numerous university and interdepartmental committees. Throughout the years he has been a Jury Member in several international literary prizes and film Festivals: Marcha (Uruguay); Casa de las Américas (La Habana, Cuba); Premio Internacional Juan Rulfo (Guadalajara, Mexico); Festival Internacional del Nuevo Cine Latinoamericano (La Habana, Cuba); Festival Internacional de San Sebastian-Donostia (Pais Vasco, Espana), Festival Internacional de Trieste (Italia).

Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish

Joan Ramon Resina

portrait: Beverly Allen
Contact: 

Pigott Hall 224
650 723 3800
jrresina@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
M/W 12:35 - 1:35 PM

Professor Resina specializes in modern European literatures and cultures with an emphasis on the Spanish and Catalan traditions. He is Director of the Catalan Observatory at Stanford and serves as Director of the Iberian Studies Program, housed in the Freeman Spogli Institute.

Professor Resina is most recently the author of Del Hispanismo a los Estudios Ibéricos. Una propuesta federativa para el ámbito cultural. Madrid: Biblioteca Nueva, 2009. In this book he lays out the rationale for the overcoming of Hispanic Studies by a new discipline of Iberian Studies by contending that the field's response to the crisis of the Humanities should not lie either in the retrenchment into the national philological traditions or in a vague cultural studies deprived of evaluative principles and oblivious of cultural history. Another recent publication is Barcelona's Vocation of Modernity: Rise and Decline of an Urban Image (Stanford UP, 2008). This book traces the development of Barcelona's modern image through texts that foreground key social and historical issues. It begins with Barcelona's "coming of age" in the 1888 Universal Exposition and focuses on the first major narrative work of modern Catalan literature, La febre d'or. Positing an inextricable link between literature and modernity, Resina establishes a literary framework for the evolution of the image of Barcelona's modernity through the 1980s, when the consciousness of modernity took on an ironic circularity. The book ends with a highly critical view on the post-Olympic period, arguing that in the early 21st century municipal politics has exhausted the so-called Barcelona model and the city has entered an era that is largely inconsistent with the forces that shaped its modern identity. 

He has also published extensively in specialized journals, such as PMLA, MLN, New Literary History, and Modern Language Quarterly, and has contributed to a large number critical volumes. He has held teaching positions at Cornell University, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and Northwestern University and received awards such as the Alexander von Humboldt and the Fullbright fellowship.

Education: 

1986: Ph.D., U.C. Berkeley, Comparative Literature
1984: Ph.D., University of Barcelona, English Philology

Language(s): 
Catalan
Language(s): 
Portuguese
Language(s): 
Spanish

Marília Librandi-Rocha

portrait: Marília Librandi-Rocha
Contact: 

Pigott Hall 218
650 725 9850
mariliar@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
On sabbatical, AY 2013-14
Focal Group(s): 
Performance
Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature

Marília Librandi-Rocha teaches Brazilian and Latin American Literature and Cultures at Stanford.  

Her first book, Maranhão-Manhattan. Ensaios de Literatura Brasileira (2009) examines the defense of fiction in the works of Sousândrade, Murilo Mendes, Paulo Leminski, and João Guimarães Rosa, in contrast to historical narratives and in dialogue with literary critics, philosophers and anthropologists.

She is currently working in her next book-length project, Writing by Ear. Brazilian Modern Fiction and the Poetics of Listening: Machado de Assis, Ramos, Rosa and Lispector. Going beyond the oral/writing divide, the book re-describes fictional texts in relation to the sense of hearing, and point to the dominant issue of listening in Modern Brazilian prose as a contribution to the theory of the novel and the actual debates on cultural studies, cosmopolitanism and World/Planetary literature.

Her other project-in-progress, Margins of Literature, concerns the relationship between literature and ethnography, from Tristes Tropiques to the Guarani Kaiowá letter, and the actual poetics of co-translation in South America, given continuity to the relationship between literary theory and Amerindian perspectivism addressed in her first book, and to the issue of listening in writings and its relation to land and human rights.

Librandi-Rocha edited and introduced the book Poemas-Vida(2008), and co-edited three recent special issues - “Literatura e Juizo de Valor”(2011), “Literatura e Viagem” (2010), and “História do Livro e da Leitura” (2009) -  of Floema, a journal of Literary Theory and History edited in Brazil.

Her recent articles have appeared in Culture, Theory & Critique, Critical Studies in Improvisation, EllipsisMantis, and are forthcoming in Luso-Brazilian Review, Estudos de Literatura Brasileira Contemporânea, and Letteratura D’América. A dossier on “Theories of the Contemporary in South America,” co-edited with Héctor Hoyos, is forthcoming at Revista de Estudios Hispánicos.

She serves as book review editor of ellipsis, journal of the American Portuguese Studies Association(Apsa).

For a selection of writings, please click on the following link: http://stanford.academia.edu/Mar%C3%ADliaLibrandiRocha

Education: 

2003: PhD, Universidade de São Paulo, Literary Theory and Comparative Literature

Language(s): 
Portuguese

Vincent Barletta

portrait: Vincent Barletta
Contact: 

Pigott Hall 225
650 723 4921
vbarletta@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
On sabbatical, AY 2013-14

Vincent Barletta is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature and Iberian and Latin American Cultures, as well as a Research Associate at Stanford's Europe Center in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. During the 2013-14 academic year, he will be on sabbatical as a full-time faculty fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center. His research and teaching interests focus on Portuguese and Lusophone literature within a comparative framework; humanistic theories of rhythm and closeness; and pastoral literature from Ancient Greece to the present.

His current book project, Rhythm: Toward a Poetics of Patience, examines theories of rhythm from pre-Socratic Greece to the late twentieth century, focusing on the work of, for example, Aeschylus, Maurice Blanchot, Luís de Camões, Emmanuel Levinas, Henri Meschonnic, and Fernando Pessoa. His most recent book is Dreams of Waking: An Anthology of Iberian Lyric Poetry, 1400-1700 (U of Chicago P, 2013), co-edited and translated with Mark L. Bajus and Cici Malik. Before this, he authored Death in Babylon: Alexander the Great and Iberian Empire in the Muslim Orient (U of Chicago P, 2010). He is also the author of Covert Gestures: Crypto-Islamic Literature as Cultural Practice in Early Modern Spain (U of Minnesota P, 2005; Spanish ed., Zaragoza: Instituto de Estudios Islámicos y del Oriente Próximo, 2005) and editor/translator of Granadan Morisco Francisco Núñez Muley's A Memorandum for the President of the Royal Audiencia and Chancery Court of the City and Kingdom of Granada (U of Chicago P, 2007). He is currently guest-editing a special issue of ellipsis devoted to the Luso-Brazilian baroque and a special issue of the Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies devoted to the theme of "closeness" and medieval Iberian literature. In recent years, he has also published research on writers such as João de Barros,  Luís de Camões, Emmanuel Levinas, Ramon Llull, Fernão de Oliveira, Fernão Mendes Pinto, and António Vieira.

Before joining the Stanford faculty in 2007, Vincent Barletta taught at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He received his PhD in Hispanic Languages and Literatures at UCLA, after which he carried out two years of post-doctoral study within UCLA's Department of Anthropology/Center for Language, Interaction, and Culture.

Education: 

1999-2001: Post-doctoral study, UCLA, Linguistic Anthropology

1998: Ph.D., UCLA, Hispanic Languages and Literatures

1989: BA with honors, Saint Mary's College of CA, English

Language(s): 
Portuguese
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