Arabic

Readings in Avicenna and al-Jurjani

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
243B
Description: 

Classical Arabic reading course. Instructor approval required. Pre-requisite: minimum two years of Arabic at Stanford or equivalent.

Instructor: 
Alexander Key
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
4
Day/Time: 
TBA

Author Visit: Sonalla Ibrahim

Date: 
Monday, 6 May 2013 - 5:30pm - 7:30pm
Location: 
Stanford Humanities Center, Board Room
Speaker: 
Sonalla Ibrahim
Language: 
Arabic

Author Visit: Sonallah Ibrahim
Sonallah Ibrahim "one of Egypt's most formally interesting and politically
uncompromising writers" will be giving a public talk in conversation with
Professor Noha Radwan (Arabic & Comp Lit, UC Davis) and Professor Alexander
Key (Arabic & Comp Lit, Stanford) in the Humanities Center Boardoom from
5:30-7:30pm on Monday 6 May 2013. His most recently translated book, "That
Smell" "was a breathtakingly subversive answer to the problem of the

Alexander Key

portrait: Sylke Tempel
Contact: 

Building 240, Room 109
akey@stanford.edu

OFFICE HOURS: 
book an appointment

Focal Group(s): 
Philosophy and Literature
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics
Curriculum Vitae: 

Alexander Key's interests range across the literary and intellectual history of the Arabic and Persian-speaking worlds from the seventh century, together with Western political thought and philosophy. He received his Ph.D. in Arabic and Islamic Studies from Harvard University's Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations in May 2012.

He is currently working on two books. One is a study of the Arabic philosophy of language, with a focus on the critical eleventh century. Its three chapters ("Arabic", "Philosophy", and "Language") will make the argument that Arabic-speaking intellectual culture was particularly productive when it came to thinking about language, and that the resulting theories constitute a valuable contribution to our conversations about the philosophy of language. The second book is a philological study of the tenth/eleventh century litterateur and polymath Ragib al-Isfahani, which will include the first ever edition of Ragib's poetics. 

Alexander is a founding editor of New Middle Eastern Studies (http://www.brismes.ac.uk/nmes/), where he has edited articles on femininity in 1920s Lebanon, women Muslim leaders in Central Asia, Iran's nuclear program, Salafi conceptions of citizenship, and Art in the Arab Spring.

 
 
Education: 

Ph.D. in Arabic and Islamic Studies, Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University, May 2012.

M.A. in Arabic and International Relations, University of St. Andrews, June 2001.

Language(s): 
Arabic

Classical Arabic Poetry: An Introduction

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
149A/346
Description: 

The primary litmus test of proficiency in the Arabic language is, and has always been, a command of classical Arabic poetry. Study and memorize the great lines of Arabic poetry with a manual that has stood the pedagogical test of time from the eleventh century until today. Questions of literary merit, poetic technique, metaphor, and divine and human linguistic innovation are all raised by the text that we will read together. Readings in Arabic, assignments and discussion in English. Prerequisite: two years of Arabic at Stanford, or equivalent.

Instructor: 
Alexander Key
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
TTh 3:15p-5:05p

The Meaning of Arabic Literature: a seminar investigation into the nebulous concept of adab

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
141A
Description: 

An investigation into the concept of literature in mediaeval Arabic. Was there a mediaeval Arabic way of thinking? We look to develop a translation for the word "adab," a concept that dominated mediaeval Arabic intellectual culture, and is related in some ways to what we mean today when we use the word literature. Our core text is a literary anthology from the 900s in Iraq and we try, together, to work out what literature meant for the author and his contemporaries. Readings, assignments, and class discussion all in English.

Instructor: 
Alexander Key
Term: 
Aut
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
MW 2:15p - 3:45p
Poster: 
course poster

Philosophies, Literatures, and Alternatives

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
151A/351A
Description: 

Aristotelian poetics and mediaeval Arabic literary theory. Nietzsche's irony and Philosophies and literatures, together and apart, dominate the last two millennia of human thought. How might they best be read? Are philosophy and literature two different ways of thinking, or are they just two separate institutional histories? This course starts with familiar Greeks, moves onto unfamiliar Arabs, confronts old Europe, and ends with contemporary Americans arguing.

Instructor: 
Alexander Key
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
TTh 11:00a-12:30p

The Arab Spring in Arabic Literature

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
146A/347
Description: 

An examination of the events of 2011 in the Middle East through literature. We will read short stories, poetry, graphic novels, and blogs in order to try and work out whether the revolution could have been predicted, and how it took place. Prerequisite: two years of Arabic at Stanford, or equivalent.

Instructor: 
Alexander Key
Term: 
Spr
Academic Year: 
2012-13
Units: 
3-5
Day/Time: 
MW 2:15p-4:05p

Reflection on the Other: The Jew in Arabic Literature, the Arab in Hebrew Literature

Subject Code: 
COMPLIT
Course Number: 
145
Crosslisted as: 
JEWISHST 106
Crosslisted as: 
AMELANG 126
Description: 

 

How literary works outside the realm of western culture struggle with questions such as identity, minority, and the issue of the other. How the Arab is viewed in Hebrew literature and how the Jew is viewed in Arabic literature. Historical, political, and sociological forces that have contributed to the shaping of the writer's views. Arab and Jewish (Israeli) culture. UG Reqs: GER:DBHum, GER:ECGlobalCom
Instructor: 
Vered Karti Shemtov
Term: 
Win
Academic Year: 
2013-14
Units: 
4
Day/Time: 
MW 3:15 PM - 4:45 PM

Guinevere Allen

portrait: Nicholas  Jenkins
Contact: 

guinevere.allen@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Curriculum Vitae: 

Guinevere completed her Bachelor of Arts in Spanish Literature at the University of California, Berkeley in 2010. She was the recipient of the Cervantes Prize for Literary Excellence, the John Walsh Award for Academic Excellence, and the Una Fellowship of History for Ph.D. research in the area of medieval Iberian studies. She is currently a Ph.D. student at Stanford University in the Department of Iberian and Latin American Cultures. Her recent invited lectures at Stanford have covered the topics of the medieval Iberian lyric of the kharja and cantigas d’amigo and the court lyric of las Cantigas de Santa Maria during the reign of Alfonso X. Her publications include: Alfonso X and the Jews: An Edition of and Commentary on Siete Partidas 7.24 “De los judios” and La metáfora semítica en los cantares de Salomón. Her current research focus is on developing a theory of hermeneutics that accounts for prosody in the dialogic metrics of medieval song book codices and early modern baroque aesthetics.

Education: 

B.A. University of California Berkeley 2010

Una Fellowship of History, Research Fellow, University of California Berkeley 2011

Ph.D. Candidate, Stanford University 2011 - 

Language(s): 
Arabic
Language(s): 
Catalan
Language(s): 
Spanish

Ramzi Salti

portrait: Ramzi Salti
Contact: 

Ramzi Salti, Ph.D.

Lecturer in Arabic Program; Author; Radio Show Host
ACTFL Oral & Written Proficiency Tester of Arabic
Stanford Langauge Center
Building 240-212
Stanford, CA 94305
 
RSalti@Stanford.edu
(650)725-1560 (office)
 
Published Author and Host of 'Arabology' radio program on KZSU Stanford 90.1 FM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Office Hours: 
MTWTh from 12:15-1pm and by appt

Ramzi M. Salti was born in 1966 in Lebanon. French educated in Beirut, he completed his high school education in Jordan where he graduated by earning his British G.C.E. (General Certificate of Education) and Tawjihi degrees. In 1983, he moved to the United States where he earned his B.A. in French and English (1988) from Santa Clara University. He went to earn his M.A. (1991) and Ph.D. (1997) in Comparative Literature (Arabic, French, English) at the University of California at Riverside.

Dr. Salti has been a full-time Lecturer in Arabic at Stanford University since 1998. He also authors his own blog 'Arabology: Cultural Productions from/about the Arab World' at http://author32.blogspot.com and hosts a weekly radio program titled 'Arabology' airing on KZSU Stanford 90.1 FM. Previous podcasts are available at www.radio4all.net/index.php/series/Arabology.

Dr. Salti's collection of short stories, titled The Native Informant & Other Stories: Six Tales of Defiance from the Arab World was published in 1994 and received much acclaim in such periodicals as "World Literature Today," "The Digest of Middle East Studies," "Tat Tarbut," and "The LA Village View". It was also critically analyzed by Dr. Chris Wise in Ethnicity and the American Short Story (Ed. Julie Brown) in 1997 and spotlighted in a chapter in Wail S. Hassan's Immigrant Narratives: Orientalism and Cultural Translation in Arab American and Arab British Literature (Oxford University Press, 2011).

 


The Native Informant & Other Stories is a collection of six short stories dealing with "unmentionable" aspects of Arab life in parts of the Arab world and in the West. Inspired by such modern writers as Alifa Rifaat, Nawal al-Sa'dawi, and Youssef Idris--authors who have, despite immeasurable odds, managed to emphasize subjects ranging from feminism to homosexuality in their works--these short stories attempt to further engage various social and political issues that remain, for the most part, largely ignored or silenced in modern Arabic literature.

Most of the stories in The Native Informant operate on a dual level by addressing not only issues related to women, homosexuals, and victims of violence in southwest Asia, but also by examining the seemingly conflicting relationship between notions of Arabness, Islam, and the West. The collection thus aims at highlighting the plight of the marginalized groups in Arab countries by broaching various issues on the social spectrum, ranging from religious intolerance, to the subjugation of women, to homophobia, to domestic violence, to Western and Eastern concepts of terrorism and neo/post coloniality, to the ethnic experience of being an Arab in the United States at a time when the media seems to be promulgating the negative stereotype of the Arab.

The author has published numerous essays and articles in such journals as "The International Fiction Review," "The Journal of Arabic Literature" and "Notes on Contemporary Literature;" he has also been a regular reviewer of Arabic literature for "World Literature Today" since the early nineties. His Doctoral thesis, which surveys the (mis)representations of marginalized sexualities in Arabic Literature, has also been published in segments in several journals.

Dr. Salti has taught a wide array of courses in Arabic Language and Literature at such institutions as Santa Clara University and U.C. Riverside and has worked, since 1997, as a full time Lecturer in Arabic at Stanford University where he has organized and participated in numerous symposia, events and talks that center on Arab-American literature, Postcolonial theory, Arabic Pop Culture, and the use of technology in language acquisition courses. He is also a fully Certified ACTFL Certified Oral and Written Proficiency Tester of Arabic by the American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL).

Salti has also amassed several prestigious awards during his years at Stanford, including the Stanford Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching (2004-5), the Association of Students of Stanford University's Honorable Mention for the Teacher of the Year Award (2009) and the Knight Favorite Professor Award by the John S. Knight Fellowships Program for Professional Journalists, Class of 2005, 2009, and 2013.

In addition to his academic writings, Salti has also worked as an Entertainment writer for various magazines and has published dozens of articles about the music and film industry in such periodicals as "The Los Angeles Times," "The West Hollywood Weekly," "4-Front Magazine;" he has also published several in depth articles about Olivia Newton-John, including a lengthy, critically acclaimed biography and complete discography of Newton-John in "DISCoveries" magazine (1995); he has also interviewed several celebrities including Debbie Harry, Marlee Matlin, Mashrou' Leila, Tania Kassis, Tania Saleh and many others. 

Salti currently resides in the San Francisco Bay area where he devotes his time to writing, blogging, radio broadcasting and teaching at Stanford University.


 
(Source and Publications:  https://www.amazon.com/author/ramzisalti)
Language(s): 
Arabic
Language(s): 
English
Language(s): 
French
Document(s): 
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