Romanticism

Matthew Walker

portrait: DLCL Admin
Contact: 

Sweet Hall, 2nd Floor, 222A
mwalker7@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
By Appointment (On Sabbatical Fall 2012 Quarter)

Matthew Walker received his Ph.D. in Slavic Languages & Literatures (with a minor in Critical Theory) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2010. Before coming to Stanford, Matthew taught for two years at the University of Pennsylvania as a visiting lecturer in Russian language, literature and culture, and he has also taught in the Russian School at Middlebury College. His main research interests are nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian literature and the history of aesthetics and literary criticism in Russia and Europe.  

Education: 

Ph.D., Slavic Languages & Literatures, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2010
B.A., Russian & English Literatures, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1996

Christopher Donaldson

portrait: Christopher Donaldson
Contact: 

c.donaldson@lancaster.ac.uk

Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics

Now Literary Research Associate, Spatial Humanities Project, Lancaster University.

 

RESEARCH & TEACHING INTERESTS

Eighteenth- & Nineteenth-Century British Literature and Culture, esp. Romantic Poetry, Fiction, and Drama; History of the Book, esp. 1700-1900; Literature and Place; Literary History & Philology; Classical Literature, esp. Greek Tragedy



DISSERTATION

The Local Poet in the Romantic Tradition (Completed, Aug. 2012)

Many poems evoke a sense of place; few poems, however, forge a lasting connection between a poet and a particular locale. In The Local Poet in the Romantic Tradition, I chart the evolution of this latter type of poetry and document its influence on readerly tastes in Britain over the last two hundred and fifty years. Parting ways with previous studies, I take the view that local poetry is defined less by its invocation of specifically named locations, or even by a proclivity for amassing topographical detail, than by the cultivation of a special kind of poetic ethos. Drawing on the works of William Wordsworth as well as a range of pre- and post-Romantic poets, I examine different instantiations of this ethos and outline the contours of the tradition of local poetry in Britain from its origins in the eighteenth century to its rise to prominence in the Victorian era. 

Committee: Roland Greene (advisor), Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, Blakey Vermeule 



PUBLICATIONS

Articles

“Evoking the Local: Wordsworth, Martineau, and Early Victorian Fiction," Review of English Studies (forthcoming 2013).

"Another Smart Letter," Notes and Queries, lix (2012)
, 338-40.

“A Missing Smart Letter Located,” Notes and Queries, lviii (2011), 504-5

“Wordsworth’s ‘To the Rev. Dr. W__.’,” Notes and Queries, lviii (2011), 542-6.




Encyclopedia Entries

“Discordia Concors,” “Expression,” and “Spontaneity,” The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics

4th edition, eds. Roland Greene and Stephen Cushman (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012)

“The Sonnet” and “Thomas Warton,” The Blackwell Encyclopaedia of British Literature, 1660-1789,
eds. Gary Day and Jack Lynch (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, forthcoming June 2013).
 

Reviews

"Idleness, Contemplation and the Aesthetic, 1750-1830, by Richard Adelman," Notes and Queries, 60 (2013) doi: 10.1093/notesj/gjs212.

"Literature 1780-1830: Romantic Poetry," The Year’s Work in English Studies 92 (forthcoming 2013).



TEACHING EXPERIENCE

INSTRUCTOR

DEPT OF COMP LIT, STANFORD UNIV, WINTER, 2011 
COURSE TITLE: On the Road: 20th-Century Travel Literature (COMPLIT 139)

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM FOR GIFTED YOUTH (EPGY), S & S INSTITUTE, KR, SUMMER, 2010 
COURSE TITLE: Elements of Analysis, Elements of Style (STANFORD, EPGY)

PROGRAM IN WRITING & RHETORIC (PWR), STANFORD UNIV, WINTER & SPRING, 2008
COURSE TITLE: Rhetorical Conversations in Poetry & the Visual Arts (PWR 1-31/37)

TEACHING ASSITANT

DEPTS OF COMP LIT AND FRENCH & ITALIAN, STANFORD UNIV, WINTER, 2009
COURSE TITLE: Literature as Performance (COMPLIT 122 & FRENGEN 122)
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht

TEACHING ASSITANT, DEPTS OF COMP LIT AND ENGLISH, STANFORD UNIV,  AUTUMN, 2008
COURSE TITLE: Poetry, Poems, Worlds (COMPLIT 121 & ENGLISH 110/010)
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Roland Greene

TEACHING ASSITANT, DEPT OF ENGLISH, STANFORD UNIV, SPRING, 2007 
COURSE TITLE: Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Donne, and their Contemporaries (ENGLISH 109 & 09)
INSTRUCTOR: Professor Martin Evans

TEACHING ASSITANT, DEPARTMENT OF COMP LIT, PENN STATE UNIV, SPRING, 2001
COURSE TITLE: Arthurian Legends (COMPLIT 107)
INSTRUCTOR: Adam Miyashiro

Adrian Daub

portrait: Adrian Daub
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 212
Phone: 650 723 9079
Fax: 650 725 8421
daub@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Curriculum Vitae: 

My research focuses on the long nineteenth century, in particular the intersection of literature, music and philosophy. My first book, "Zwillingshafte Gebärden": Zur kulturellen Wahrnehmung des vierhändigen Klavierspiels im neunzehnten Jahrhundert  (Königshausen & Neumann, 2009), traces four-hand piano playing as both a cultural practice and a motif in literature, art and philosophy. My second book Uncivil Unions - The Metaphysics of Marriage in German Idealism and Romanticism  (University of Chicago Press, 2012), explored German philosophical theories of marriage from Kant to Nietzsche. My most recent book, Tristan's Shadow - Sexuality and the Total Work of Art (University of Chicago Press, 2013), deals with eroticism in German opera after Wagner. My current book project will trace the fate of the dynasty in the age of the nuclear family. In addition, I have published articles on topics such as fin-de-siècle German opera, the films of Hans-Jürgen Syberberg, literature and scandal, the cultural use of ballads in the nineteenth century, and writers like Novalis, Stefan George, Walter Benjamin, Theodor Adorno and W.G. Sebald.

Education: 

2008 Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania
2004 M.A. University of Pennsylvania
2003 B.A. Swarthmore College

Language(s): 
German

Carolyn Springer

portrait: Beverly Allen
Contact: 

135 Pigott Hall
650 723 1531
springer@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Renaissances

Professor Carolyn Springer came to Stanford in 1985 after receiving a Ph.D. in Italian language and literature from Yale University. She has received fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities / American Academy in Rome, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Harvard Center for Italian Renaissance Studies / Villa I Tatti, the Ford Foundation, and the Fulbright Foundation. Her research has focused primarily on Renaissance and nineteenth-century literature and cultural history. She has published articles and reviews in Annali d’italianistica, Boundary 2: A Journal of Postmodern Literature, Canadian Journal of Italian Studies, Forum Italicum, GRADIVA: International Journal of Literature, The International Journal of the Humanities, Italian Quarterly, The Italianist, Italica (Journal of the American Association of Italian Studies), Modern Language Studies, NEMLA Italian Studies, Quaderni d’italianistica, Renaissance Quarterly, Sixteenth Century Journal, Stanford Italian Review, Versus: Quaderni di studi semiotici, Woman’s Art Journal, The Wordsworth Circle, and Yale Italian Studies.  Professor Springer’s books include The Marble Wilderness: Ruins and Representation in Italian Romanticism, 1775-1850 (Cambridge University Press, 1987; reprinted in paperback, 2010); Immagini del Novecento italiano (Macmillan, coeditors Pietro Frassica and Giovanni Pacchiano); and History and Memory in European Romanticism (special issue of Stanford Literature Review).  Her latest book, Armour and Masculinity in the Italian Renaissance, appeared in 2010 with University of Toronto Press.

Education: 

Ph.D., Italian Language and Literature, with Distinction

Yale University

M.A., Italian Language and Literature

Yale University

B.A., magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa
College of Letters,
Wesleyan University

Language(s): 
Italian

Monika Greenleaf

portrait:
Contact: 

Building 240, Room 105
Phone: 650 725 5933
monika.greenleaf@gmail.com

Office Hours: 
Thursday 2:30-4:30
Focal Group(s): 
Performance
Education: 

Ph.D., Yale University

M.A., Yale University

B.A., M.A., Oxford University

B.A., Stanford University

Language(s): 
Russian
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