Realism

Matthew Walker

portrait: DLCL Admin
Contact: 

Sweet Hall, 2nd Floor, 222A
mwalker7@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
By Appointment (On Sabbatical Fall 2012 Quarter)

Matthew Walker received his Ph.D. in Slavic Languages & Literatures (with a minor in Critical Theory) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2010. Before coming to Stanford, Matthew taught for two years at the University of Pennsylvania as a visiting lecturer in Russian language, literature and culture, and he has also taught in the Russian School at Middlebury College. His main research interests are nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian literature and the history of aesthetics and literary criticism in Russia and Europe.  

Education: 

Ph.D., Slavic Languages & Literatures, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2010
B.A., Russian & English Literatures, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1996

Jami-Lin L. Williams

Office Hours: 
by appointment
Education: 

B.A. in English and Spanish, Wellesley College, magna cum laude 2011. Honors Thesis in Spanish: Espacio. Conflicto. Identidad.: Cuatro itinerarios por la Barcelona de posguerra.

Language(s): 
Catalan
Language(s): 
Spanish

Gabriella Safran

portrait:
Contact: 

Building 260, Room 109
Phone: 650 723 4414
gsafran@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
Thursdays 10-12
Focal Group(s): 
Humanities Education
Focal Group(s): 
Performance
Curriculum Vitae: 

 

Gabriella Safran has written on Russian, Polish, Yiddish, and French literatures and cultures.  Her most recent book, Wandering Soul:  The Dybbuk's Creator, S. An-sky (Harvard, 2010), is a biography of an early-twentieth-century Russian-Yiddish writer who was also an ethnographer, a revolutionary, and a wartime relief worker. 

Safran teaches and writes on Russian literature, Yiddish literature, folklore, and folkloristics.  She is now working on two projects:  a monograph investigating nineteenth-century short Russian and Yiddish fiction in the context of the history of listening, and an article looking at the interaction of the Russian and Jewish rhetorical traditions among early-twentieth-century revolutionaries.  

As the chair of the DLCL, Safran is increasingly interested in the reorganization of humanities departments and the implications of that for teaching, learning, and scholarship.

Education: 

Ph.D., Slavic Languages and Literatures, Princeton University, 1998.
B.A., magna cum laude, with honors in Soviet and East European Studies, Yale University, 1990.

 

Language(s): 
Hebrew
Language(s): 
Russian
Language(s): 
Yiddish
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