Nabokov

Matthew Walker

portrait: DLCL Admin
Contact: 

Sweet Hall, 2nd Floor, 222A
mwalker7@stanford.edu

Office Hours: 
By Appointment (On Sabbatical Fall 2012 Quarter)

Matthew Walker received his Ph.D. in Slavic Languages & Literatures (with a minor in Critical Theory) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2010. Before coming to Stanford, Matthew taught for two years at the University of Pennsylvania as a visiting lecturer in Russian language, literature and culture, and he has also taught in the Russian School at Middlebury College. His main research interests are nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian literature and the history of aesthetics and literary criticism in Russia and Europe.  

Education: 

Ph.D., Slavic Languages & Literatures, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2010
B.A., Russian & English Literatures, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1996

Luke Parker

portrait: Luke Parker
Contact: 

lparker1@stanford.edu

Focal Group(s): 
Digital Humanities
Focal Group(s): 
Workshop in Poetics
Curriculum Vitae: 

 

Dissertation:

“Literature at the Junction: Russian Émigré Writers in Interwar Berlin and Paris.” 

A study of Russian writers in the context of 1920s and ‘30s Europe, examining the interaction between émigré and Western literary production. The Russophone literary career of Vladimir Nabokov from 1922 to 1939 is used as a focal point, toward which the contemporary writings of Vladislav Khodasevich, Ivan Bunin, and other Paris-based writers converge. Their fiction and criticism is set against the backdrop of a native reaction to the postwar climate, treating in particular the changes in psyche and city reflected upon in the work of Sigmund Freud, Walter Benjamin, and Siegfried Kracauer.


Conference papers:

"Nabokov in Weimar: Culture Criticism and Nabokov's Early Russian Novels"
AATSEEL (American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages) Annual Conference
Chicago, January 9-12 2014

"Emigration, Backwardness, and the Search for a New Present: Russian and American Writers in Interwar Europe"
ACLA (American Comparative Literature Association) Annual Meeting 
Collapse/Catastrophe/Change
Brown University, March 29 - April 1 2012

"At the Front: War and Avant-Garde in British and Russian Post-WWI Poetry"
Stanford Graduate Conference in Comparative Literature
Agency and its Limits: Action, Paralysis, Lethargy, Arrest
Stanford University, April 15-16 2011

"The Unconscious Text: Pale Fire via Freud, pace Nabokov,
2010 Stanford Graduate Program in Humanities Symposium
Order, Disruption, and Representation of Legitimacy
Stanford University, May 14 2010

"An Analysis of Pale Fire as Verse Text"
2010 California Slavic Colloquium
New Takes on Old Texts
University of Southern California, April 17 2010


Teaching:

 

Guest Lecturer, SLAVIC 156, Nabokov in the Transnational Context, Fall 2013-14

Teaching Assistant, SLAVGEN 148, Dissent and Disenchantment: Russian Literature and Culture Since the Death of Stalin, Spring 2011-12

Teaching Assistant, SLAVGEN 190, Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina and the Social Thought of Its Time, Winter 2011-12

Instructor, SLAVLANG 1/2/3, First Year Russian, Fall/Winter/Spring 2010-11


Languages:

Russian (Advanced High)
French (Advanced)
German (Intermediate)
Polish (Novice)

Education: 

2008: B.A. Modern Languages (Russian & French). Oxford University (Christ Church College). 


2007: Acting Program. St.Petersburg State Academy of Theater Art. St.Petersburg, Russia.

Language(s): 
Russian

Monika Greenleaf

portrait:
Contact: 

Building 240, Room 105
Phone: 650 725 5933
monika.greenleaf@gmail.com

Office Hours: 
Thursday 2:30-4:30
Focal Group(s): 
Performance
Education: 

Ph.D., Yale University

M.A., Yale University

B.A., M.A., Oxford University

B.A., Stanford University

Language(s): 
Russian
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