Hymenolepiasis



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Epidemiology of Hymenolepis spp.

 

In humans, infections with Hymenolepis nana are much more common than infections with Hymenolepis diminuta. H. nana is the most common cause of all cestode infections and is encountered worldwide. In temperate areas, its incidence is higher in children and institutionalized groups. H. diminuta is less frequent, but has been reported from various areas of the world. parasitization rate ranging between .0001 and 5.5%.

 

United States:

Infections were previously common in the southeastern United States, and have been described in crowded environments and individuals confined to institutions. The CDC received reports of only 48 cases of H. diminuta in the US since 1965.

 

Worldwide:

Isolated cases of H. diminuta from Spain, Russia, and Eastern Europe have been recently published.

But, a relatively high prevalence of H. nana has been reported in surveys conducted in Europe and Latin America.